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PROLOGUE 

This is a yearbook . . . 

quite like many other books of its typi 
And yet . . . somehow different. 



quite similar to the thousands which 
have preceded it, and to the unpredict- 
able many (or few) which may follow 
it . . . 

And yet . . . somehow different. 
This is a portrait . . . 

of many colleges, and yet one col- 
lege . . . 

And therefore . . . somehow different. 



Where are the foundations for labelling the obviously simi- 
lar as different or distinct? 

More specifically, how can the assertion be justified that a 
yearbook, a year, a college is really unique when, in fact, a 
negligible amount of observation and comparison produces 
likenesses which though often fabricated, are often factual 
and, on occasion, painfully true? 

Perhaps the most obvious answer is to be discovered within 
a group to whom any claim of uniqueness becomes readily 
apparent, readily defensible, namely the seniors. This is under- 
standable. For graduation year obviously marks a period of 
time as singular. So too, a college reveals its distinctiveness in 
countless minor ways over a four year span, — ways so subtle, 
so elusive of description that they are bound up in a mental 
complex which runs the gamut from freshmen awe to senior 
loyalty. 

But what of the question of yearbooks? They seem to be 
justified in existence merely by the annual birth of new seniors. 
If this be the case, this book has approximately one thousand 
reasons for being, and is rightly directed toward them to do 
with what they will. 

Basically a yearbook is a portrait of something impressive, 
and indeed memorable. A memory-book, if you wish. How- 
ever, this is not always so; for college annuals serve many 
functions: as a toy, quite durable; but like all playthings — at 
first carefully fondled and examined for flaws, then soon 
thrown aside and forgotten to be later rediscovered for new 
enjoyment; or perhaps, as decorations, as shelf-filler, or as a 
door-stop. However, its true purposes should not be over- 
looked. They dominate every thought and act of an editor as 
he strives to convey true meaning through a yearbook: 

Let this book portray the distinctiveness its owner feels 

exists in this college; 
Let this book be a source of pride when shown to others, 
not for any cleverness it may contain, but for the in- 
tangible it attempts to capture; 
Let it be a picture-book for yet unborn children; and per- 
haps, because of it, for future seniors and alumni; 
Above all, let it be a mental goad, prodding the mind to 
remember often the pleasantries, friendships, and yes, 
anxieties of days long past, but worth recalling. 
This is an attempt to accomplish these purposes through 
people, places, and events. It mingles the noteworthy with the 
incidental, the athletic with the social, the crowded with the 
lonely, the spiritual with the material. This is an amalgam of 




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THE STUDENT LIFE... 





Cultural Organizations 

Academic Societies . 

Athletic Teams . . 




Language . . . 
Science . . . 
Business . . . 
Nursing . . . 





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THE ACADEMICS 





Vital principle throughout 





THE CLAS 




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THE SENIORS 



Achievement . . . 

Exhaustion . . . 

Milestone . . 

Challenge 




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A DEDICATION 





Unquestionably the role of the lay faculty in Catholic 
college life has reached a position of preeminence and 
esteem. No more manifest evidence of this fact can be found 
than here at Boston College where the lay faculty fill over 
half of the teaching positions in the University. Indeed the 
relationship of lay teachers to the Catholic collegiate educa- 
tional system has progressed from one of temporary necessity 
to one of permanent dependence. 

Here at Boston College we are privileged to have on our 
faculty two men who have served well this University, their 
Church, and their profession, first in recognizing the in- 
estimably valuable assistance they could lend to Catholic 
higher education; secondly in selflessly offering their life's 
work to meet the challenge confronting Boston College, and 
thirdly, by being the exemplars, par excellence, both of those 
who inaugurated the lay-teacher program, and to the count- 
less number of their colleagues who have followed their 
footsteps. 

Mr. Harold Fagan is numbered among the Boston College 
graduates of 1919 — in the days when Boston College was 
synonymous with one building, Gasson Hall. His were the 
days of fellow classmates such as Ryder, Brickley, Furthey; 
of fellow teammates Douglas, Dullea, Shortell; of a 1919 
34-6 rout of Holy Cross. His were the years of men who 
are renowned for their devotion to Boston College. 

After graduation, Professor Fagan both taught Chemistry 
here at the College, and at the same time was graduate- 
studying at M.I.T. where he became a Master of Science in 
Chemistry in 1920. Since then — for forty-one years — he 
has given himself and his talents to thousands of Pre-Medical 
and Chemistry majors who, for their later successes, are 
immeasurably in his debt. 

Mr. Harold Zager was not an undergraduate alumnus of 
Boston College. In 1922 he was graduated a Bachelor of 
Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and 
during that year began his teaching career at Boston College, 
later to receive one of the first Master of Science degrees 
granted by this College. He was well known and beloved 
about the University, but especially in the College of Busi- 
ness Administration where he served as an Associate Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics. Requiescat in pace. 

Yes, theirs were the years of men devoted to Boston 
College. It is the hope of the class of I960 that this dedica- 
tion will, in some measure, indicate our gratitude to them 
both, for portraying with their lives the greatness of the past 
for us, the graduates of I960. 



Harold A. Zager, Associate Professor of Mathematics 




Harold H. Fagan, Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Tireless effort, unwavering loyalty, 

selfless sacrifice . 




Dean of the lay faculty, Professor Fagan relates his many years of classroom experi- 
ence which never fail to enlighten and delight his colleagues during faculty-lounge 
conversations. 



The lab, the experiments, the lectures, the students . . . these have been, and are 
his life. 



BENEATH THE TOWER . . . 










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CONTENTS 

CAMPUS 

TWENTY NINE 

STUDENT LIFE 

ORGANIZATIONS . . . FORTY ONE 
SPORTS . . . ONE HUNDRED AND FIVE 

ACADEMICS 

ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY FIVE 

AN INTANGIBLE 

THREE HUNDRED AND TWENTY THREE 





AMPUS 




SHADOW 



30 




Truly is it said that the eyes are the windows of the soul. 
And yet on occasion the mind fails to advert to what is pre- 
sented visually to it, sometimes because preoccupation with 
other matters distorts the mental image; but more often because 
commonplace elements of a scene are so taken for granted that, 
even though vaguely perceived, they escape being noticed. 

Primarily the latter result is effected by the presence of a 
very real barrier between sight and mind — the barrier of 
familiarity. 

This is not difficult to understand, especially in regard to 
something so elementary, so obvious, so commonplace, so 
familiar as shadows. 

Shadows are as numerous and as varied as the subjects which 
give them birth. At the Heights, our towers dominate the skies; 
but who has noticed their long graceful shadows stretching 
across our pathways and lawns? Perhaps no one. 

No, — some notice, they are freshmen. 

The shadows of buildings like all other aspects of a new and 
strange place, at first evoke fear which, in time subsides to an 
indescribable "inner something" no less than awe. Yes, fresh- 
men note well these portentous shadows; and far from avoiding 
their foreboding grasp, eventually seek and welcome them as 
refuge. In a shadow's essence of darkness, of seeming nothing- 
ness, there is merciful anonymity. In them one may avoid the 
terrifying, infamiliar jargon and indifferent glances of those 
who themselves, but a year or two earlier, wondered and 
watched. In them one may slip from the rushing mainstream of 
apparently aimless direction to rest, to decide which is Fulton 
and which Devlin. In short one may observe, and yet remain 
unobserved. 

Do you recall, senior, your first friend, ever silent, wondrously 
comforting, mercifully shielding — the shadows of Boston 
College? 








32 





Gasson Hall . . . The Rotunda 



Bapst Library . . . Ford Tower 



Lyons Hall 




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Fulton Hall 



Gasson Hall Tower from College Road 




35 






The Eagle 










TAe Dorms . . . St. Joseph's (upper left), Gonzaga, Kostka, 
O'Connell (center), Xavier, Loyola, Clover (foreground). 



Gasson Hall flanked by Devlin Hall 





Loyola Hall 





Gasson Hall Tower from St. Mary's Hall 



Resident Students' Chapel . . . Gonzaga 



St. Mary's Hall . . . Faculty Residence 




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Alumni Hall 



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The Cloister ...St. Mary's Hall 



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Bapst Tower at Night 





THE STUDENT LIFE 




LIGHT 



42 




There are elements other than stately shadows about our 
campus which so vividly and yet so unobtrusively fashion the 
complete picture that is Boston College. But like every true 
portrait, the individual elements brushed on any canvas to 
represent reality are so interdependent that, should they not 
naturally complement one another in detail, the total effect 
will belie even the most conscientious efforts to the contrary. 

Shadows are begotten by light — electric light, candlelight, 
and most of all, by sunlight which sharply defines their periph- 
eries and which, though always present, never penetrates them. 

Our timid freshman changes as he passively observes his 
"new world" revolve chaotically and the unwieldly shadows shift 
ever so imperceptibly about him. He must move himself to 
remain within their shielding grasp, to continue his furtive ob- 
servations, to learn his place in this world called "college life." 

And he does learn; the holy aura typically associated with 
strange surroundings, impersonal faces, and a new way of life, 
lifts — dispelled by welcome light. 

But strange to say, the revealing light beyond the bounds of 
his dark world, the sunlight in which all "the initiated" walk, 
to his exclusion, is not the medium whereby he sees. No, his is 
the light of perception, of adaptation, of understanding. His is 
the light whose source must, of necessity, arise from within, the 
gradual dawning of an awareness that no matter how friendly 
the shadows may be, he must walk in self -created light if he is 
to live the life of Boston College. 

The change completed — he is a sophomore. 




43 




44 




Campus ^Wide 
ORGANIZATIONS 



45 




Aquinas Circle 



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The Aquinas Circle, composed of upperclassmen, discusses 
and evaluates current philosophical and moral issues. During 
the past year particular philosophical views of education 
were discussed and their solutions of current educational 
problems evaluated. Also in view of the considerable space 
in newspapers and periodicals that has been devoted to the 
"population explosion" and in most cases the anti-Scholastic 
solutions that have been offered, considerable time was 
devoted to the morality of these solutions in the light of 
Scholastic philosophy. 

Under the guidance of Fr. Reilly this organization has 
been received with great favor by large segments of the 
student body and has done much to help the student to 
appreciate not only the Scholastic system but many of the 
world's other philosophies. 

The Circle has no officers or dues; and meetings, held 
weekly, are of a discussive nature. Through this type of 
meeting the Aquinas Circle supplements the instruction 
received in the classroom and aids the student in applying 
philosophical principles and theories to concrete situations. 

Analyzing the philosophical aspects of the "population explosion" 
are Aquinas Circle members, -(left to right) Dom Perriello, Bob 
Greene, Joe Lukas, Gene Calabro, Bob Doyle, Dick Wallace, Fr. 
Reilly, Moderator; Bob Morrissey, Walter Mahoney, Jack Matthews, 
Steve Concannon. 



Boston College Band 



Trombonists vie for the spotlight a la the famous "76" of Music Man. 





Mr. Peter Siragusa strives for a pia- 
nissimo from the enthusiastic pep 
band between periods of another 
hockey victory at McHugh. 



The lone trumpeter practices for the 
traditional "FIGHT" cheer to be 
heard in the B.C. stands on Saturday. 




Possibly the best known extra-curricular activity on our 
campus is the Boston College "Eagles" Band. Under the enthu- 
siastic leadership of Mr. Peter Siragusa, the band's director for 
the past four years, membership has nearly doubled to the 
present figure of seventy men. This is a most versatile group 
as its numerous activities indicate. During the fall, it is an 
integral part of football festivities and has performed its half- 
time shows to an estimated audience of thirty million people. 
This figure is probaly conservative because of the wide tele- 
vision coverage afforded two games from Alumni Stadium. 

At formal R.O.T.C. functions the band represents the Cadet 
Corps, and on several occasions, has been cited for its excellence 



in competition among participating universities of the First 
Army area. As a pep band, it has entertained many hockey and 
basketball fans between periods. In fact, shortly after mid-year 
exams, when the band did not appear at one of the hockey 
games because of another commitment, many asked if its 
members were among those scholastically deficient. Of course, 
the major event during the Band-year is its annual participa- 
tion in New York's St. Patrick's Day Parade by personal invita- 
tion of His Eminence, Francis Cardinal Spellman, a clear 
indication of the esteem with which the University and its 
Band are held. Students, alumni and friends concur that the 
present Boston College Band is the finest in recent years. 




Beneath the towers, and before a 
pleased crowd, the Eagles' March- 
ing Band renders a salute to the 
Naval Academy during half-time. 



47 



Debating Society 




Dr. John Mahoney instructs the B.C. De- 
baters in the famous tradition of Demos- 
thenes' "On the Crown," (first row) Kevin 
Byrne, Vice President; John McNealy, Pres- 
ident; Francis Scaduto, John Sullivan, 
(second row) John Connolly, Jim Bolger, 
Frank Mahoney, Phil Landrigan, (third 
row) John O'Connell, William Collins, Paul 
McNamara. 



In its second year of operation under the new policy of 
opening membership to students in all undergraduate schools, 
the Boston College Debating Society, under the direction of 
Dr. John Mahoney, Moderator, enjoyed another fruitful and 
successful season. 

Among its activities were participation in the National Jesuit 
Tournament in Chicago, the Cherry Blossom Tournament in 
Washington, and numerous tournaments throughout New 




England, many of which were sponsored by the Greater Boston 
Forensic Association. 

A variety of debates and talks were presented before various 
religious, civic, and social organizations; weekly meetings 
featured discussions of various topics of current interest and 
concern. The season reached its culmination with the annual 
Prize Debate. 

Dramatics Society 



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Theatrical trunk and billboard accentuate the 
thespian air of Student Activity Building Room 
108. At home in such surroundings are Dramatic 
Society personnel, (left to right) Larry Gleason, 
Brenda Crowley, Secretary; James O'Hearn, Presi- 
dent; Hans Hermans, Treasurer; Jack McNealy, 
Caroline Duffy, Vice President. 



As in past years, one of the most popular and best known 
organizations on campus, is the Dramatic Society. Room 108 
of the ancient and honorable Student Activities Building, 
known to members as the "Lounge," is the headquarters of this 
campus-wide group. Here fledgling actors and actresses, stage- 
hands and technicians, seniors and freshman, gather for re- 
hearsals and the latest theater talk. 

An innovation this year was the presentation of three major 
productions instead of the usual two, as well as the move off 
campus to a downtown stage. 

The show of the year was Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part I, 
which was presented in the late fall in Campion Hall. This 
historical comedy of an errant Prince and his aged father 
featured Jim O'Hearn as King Henry, Larry Gleason as Prince 
Hal, and Tom Luddy as the renegade Hotspur. But Kevin 
Byrne, playing the portly and rascally Falstaff, came close to 
stealing the show. 

The second undertaking of the season was the farcical 
comedy Harvey, which was viewed by large audiences at the 
Little Opera House. This whimsical tale of an eccentric old 
man and his equally eccentric rabbit saw leading roles played 
by Peter Dee, Flora McLaughlin, and Maureen O'Brien, as well 
as one large white rabbit. 

In addition to both productions, the members of the Society 
took part in a number of other activities, including workshop 
productions and the One Act Play Contest. Many lent their 
talents to presentations of various other schools and organiza- 
tions in Greater Boston. 

The Society this year was directed by Rev. John J. McCarthy, 
S.J., Moderator, and Rev. Joseph Larkin, S.J., Director. 








Script girl, prop-man, extra, and prin- 
cipals combine to stage the season's 
opener — Henry IV. 



4^ 






Campus Council 



In the student government arrangement at Boston College, 
the constitutional experts often have recourse to the phrases 
"horizontal" and "vertical" in describing the various levels of 
the student government whose jurisdictions often overlap and 
whose duties are never quite adequately denned. From this 
intricate and delicate geometrically linear setup, a fairly hetero- 
geneous group of individuals is selected and its main effect on 
the exterior constitutional charts-and-graphs concept of the 
government has been to more or less upset its entire delicate 
symmetry. But the Campus Council on the practical level has 
actually contributed much to University life in the pursuit of 
its lofty aims of fostering and promoting the spiritual, cultural, 
and academic welfare of the entire student body. 

The early history of the establishment and inauguration of 
the Campus Council is remarkably similar to that of the 
establishing of the American Constitution in 1789. Like the 
nebulous and archaic Articles of Confederation of post-Revo- 
lutionary days, the old twenty-four member Campus-wide 
50 Council was so cumbersome and deliberative that it never got 



Student Administrators seek counsel and advice from the 
University's chief executive, Father Rector. The group in- 
cludes (left to right) Bernard Plansky, Edmund Madden, 
James Tonra, Alexander Urbanowicz, Margaret Lynch, and 
John Keane. 



any work done. In attempting to create a more effective cen- 
tralized government body, the initiators of the present Campus 
Council came face to face with the same difficulties that plagued 
Jefferson, Adams, Madison, and Washington. While the Found- 
ing Fathers required sixteen weeks laboring in that hot 
Philadelphia summer to reconcile the divergent interests of 
Federalist and Nationalist, it was two years before the B.C. 
governmental pioneers were able to produce a system of gov- 
ernment that seemed satisfactory to all concerned, the end 
result being that the six council members were appointed by 
the individual student senates, thus representing, in actuality 
not the students directly, but the senates. The nine-point pro- 
gram finally hammered out by the council included attempts 
to subsidize the education of more foreign students, the estab- 
lishment of annual outstanding faculty member and alumnus 
awards, and the long-awaited inauguration of a series of 
"mixers" that were conducted on Friday nights in the hockey 
rink. 




Humanities 

The Humanities is the undergraduate liberal arts 
journal of Boston College. Published semi-annually, 
it is devoted to original essays of research and criti- 
cism in history and the historical studies of art, litera- 
ture, philosophy, and music. Established three years 
ago, the magazine has doubled its size and now 
includes lengthy critical book reviews as a part of its 
overall format. The Humanities attempts to combine 
the best features of the scholarly periodicals and 
magazines like Atlantic or Harper's. 

The subjects treated in the past have ranged from 
comparisons between Shakespeare and Ben Johnson, 
Demosthenes and Edmund Burke, F. Scott Fitzgerald 
and Thomas Wolfe. The careers of famous men in 
history have been traced: St. Thomas a Becket, 
Machiavelli, Calvin Coolidge, General de Gaulle. 
Major cultural evolutions have been analyzed: from 
education under Naziism and the extension of Roman 
citizenship throughout Europe to the coming of the 
Boston Irish. 



Martin F. Nolan, Humanities editor, interests John Gallivan with a 
discovered while browsing through the Greek Dictionary. 



ltty passage )ust 



Stylus 



This year's Stylus, has maintained a tradition of 
competent undergraduate literary achievement. As in 
past years the magazine featured a wide range of 
excellent material and an oftentimes novel and attrac- 
tive layout and design; and moreover has conscien- 
tiously attempted to present both artwork and poetry 
which did not look just as well upside down as any 
other way. 

In general, the poetry picture was noticeably en- 
larged for budding Byrons and the return of less 
drastic forms of meter and rhyme. Two of its poems 
received honorable mention in the Atlantic Monthly 
contest; and one or two others were printed in literary 
magazines off campus to the amazement of a payola- 
conscious student body. To give even further con- 
firmation to suspicious minds one short story placed 
fourth in that division of the Atlantic Monthly contest. 

The brand of not-so-subtle satire termed the inimi- 
table "Stylus type," had its day or we should say, its 
pages, hidden in so occult and so unnoticeable a spot 
as page one, where "organization, administration, and 
the rights of the individual," (Stylus editor's quote) 
were parodied in an organizational chart peculiar to 
business corporations, hierarchical fraternal lodges, 
and other such bureaucratic regimes — all this to the 
amazement of A&S faculty and students who appar- 
ently, but mistakenly, thought that the boys from 
Gasson's dungeons were innocent, in their own the- 
oretical liberal-arts way, to the native practices and 
"practicalities" customarily associated with the build- 
ing across the quadrangle. 

The self-styled anarchists, bearded and all, pictured 
about this page are undoubtedly a symbol of some- 
thing or other (perhaps of a group looking for a side 
in which to be a thorn). 



The "bearded ones" from lower Gasson emerge from their literary lair to shake the 
University's foundations with something more than words. 





The massive organ of Boston's Symphony Hall serves as an appropriate backdrop for the voices - 
eighty-five strong — from the Heights. 




Maestro Peloquin here reflects the 
intensity of purpose to be found 
at the core of the Glee Club in 
their highly successful renaissance 
of our Catholic musical heritage. 



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"Rank on rank, the hosts of heaven ...,'' 
sing the tenor section as' the autumn dark- 
ness from without descends upon the fourth 
floor of Lyons Hall. 




Boston College Glee Club 

As in past years the Glee Club, eighty male voices strong, with 
an extensive eastern spring tour, continues to enhance the reputa- 
tion of Boston College, and to reacquaint concert audiences with 
the beauty and power synonymous with our Catholic musical 
heritage. 

Under the expert tutelage of Maestro C. Alexander Peloguin, 
the Club has attained new heights of renown and critical acclaim. 
Inexhaustible patience and energy characterize both Mr. Peloquin 
and Fr. Richard Costello, moderator, in their efforts to make this 
musical group a fitting representative of Boston College through- 
out the concert season. 

Late afternoon rehearsals, late suppers, and a love of good music 
characterize this choral fraternity whose gathering place high in 
Lyons Hall is the sounding board for music ranging from Lotti to 
Rodgers and Hammerstein. 

The I960 concert tour had the voices from the Heights singing 
in such places as Hartford, Connecticut; Washington, D. C; New 
York, New Rochelle, and Long Island, plus numerous local con- 
certs culminating in the annual Home Concert for alumni and 
friends at Jordan Hall. 




Service . . . Sacrifice . . . The Gold Key Society. 



Gold Key Society 

The Gold Key Society consists of a group of Boston College 
men dedicated to the service of the University, the students, and 
any and all persons or groups visiting the University whether for 
athletic, cultural, social, or scholastic purposes; and with the 
express goal of fostering a greater love and spirit for Boston 
College. 

The Society's program for the year commenced with the annual 
victory dance at the Sheraton Plaza following the Navy football 
game. Other highlights of the year included the Boston University 
and the Holy Cross rallies which consisted of floats, parades and 
pep talks by various members of the faculty and football team. 
The manpower of the Gold Key was used extensively to serve 
the needs of the Athletic Association in ushering at all of the home 
football games. Many members volunteered to assist in the organi- 
zation and ushering at seminars, lectures, meeting visiting athletic 
teams, and special events which are fairly numerous. The annual 
Gold Key Banquet was held in late November and twelve seniors 
were awarded their keys for outstanding service to the Society. 



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Gold Key members obligingly pose for Sub Turri. (First rote) Dave Wring, Rick Pierce, George Dunne, Joe Steinkrauss, (second row) 
Mike Mazva, Bob Hart, Kevin Folan, Dick Zilinski, (third row) Joe Walker, John Burke, John McAuliffe, Kevin O'Neil, Steve Coyne, 
(fourth row) Jim Norton, Steve Witkun, Bernard Plansky, Jim Reilly, Al Hyland (fifth rotv) John McNamara, James Tonda, Matt 
Connolly, Jack Kilkelly. 




54 







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SERVICE W SACRIFICE 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



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After the smoke from "the Cross" rally cleared away, the Key paused for 
a breather to formulate new plans and new ways to serve the College, 
(left to right) Joe Steinkrauss, Albert Hyland, Treasurer; John Kilkelly, 
Vice President; Richard Pierce, Jim Reilly, President; Jim Tonra, John 
McNamara, Secretary. 



"Collegium Bostoniense vincet Collegium Sanctae Crucis . . . per omnia 
saecula saeculorum!" 

— Fr. Connor, 1959 A.D. — 



The Gold Key Society has endeavored this year as in every other 
year to serve Boston College to the best of its ability through the 
personal sacrifice of its members. 

The Society draws its membership from the male population of 
the University. Each member is required to serve a term of 
apprenticeship as a test and measure of his capacity for service 
and sacrifice. 




Unveiled is the missile which Cru- 
saders felt on the next day . . . 
placing our traditional rivals in orbit. 



SS 




Clicking typewriters . 
worried conferences . 
patient rewriting . . . 
angry phones . . . 
angrier letters . . . 
The Heights. 




®i?F ifnrjljts 



l College, published weekly on 
ear, with the exception of the 
and the exam periods, by and 
ity. Address all correspondence 
ities Building, Boston College, 
i as second class matter at the 
m price $3 per year, $1.50 for 
urnished on request. 
Member of Associated Collegiate Press. Intercollegiate Press 



Student newspaper of Bostc 
-iday during the academic J 
aster and Christmas holidays 
r the students of the Univer 

The Heights, Student Acti 
nestnut Hill 67, Mass. Entert 
sston Post Office. Subscripti 
rvicemen. Advertising rates 



and Catholic College Press Association 
therwise 
for Adv 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Bob Hart, '60 
FEATURES EDITOR 

ithony Thomas Arlotto, ' 

SPORTS EDITORS 

Tim Savage, '60 
Phil Langan, '60 



'60 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Christopher C. Morton, '6 
NEWS EDITORS 
John Gallivan, '61 

Ed Hurley, '61 

COPY EDITORS 

J. Roddy Cannon, '61 

R. Michael Murray, '61 



BUSINESS MANAGER— Anthony L. Anderson, 
.ough, Paul !■ 
ceHanley, CI 



'61 



ck Sv 



stopher 
Marcia 



Doyle 



Editorials . . . decisions . 
. . . "Hello — yes, Brooks.' 
Chief. 



erudite letters . . 
. . The Heights. Br 



more angry phones 
in Moran, Editor-in- 



Asst. Editors: Gene DeVita, Ed McDoi 
News Staff: John T. Cummings, Beatr 
Lee, Richard Dionne, 
O'Neill, Claudia Demer 
Robinson, Greg Burke, Mary Ann 
Mary Ann True, Ed Duffy, Willi; 
Mary Kay Morrin, Bob Carbone. 
Features Staff: Brenda Crowley, Jack McNealy, James Waters, 

Martin Nolan, Tim Guiney. 
Sports Staff: ■ Robert Tarpey, Jerry Farrell, Joe Gergen, Pat 
Hurley, Joe Scalley, Terry Ryan, Tom Sheehan. 
Business Staff: Walter Henneberry, Tom Regan, Edward Kara- 
zin. Paul Slamin, Ed Dolan, Tom Farrell. Vera 
Lynne Willetts, Elaine Fiaschetti, Ned Meara, 
William Kingsbury, Steve McKenna. 
Typists: Annette Catania, Pat Dalton, Laraine Geswell, Marga- 
ret Curley, Karen McGorty, Alice Farrell, Mary Busa- 
lacchi, Sue Cataldo, Peggy McLaughlin, Helen Steele, 
Diane Glennon Carol Keleher, Lois Krodel, Ellen' 
Lally. 
MODERATORS: Rev. William J. Leonard, S.J., Mr. Leo James 
Fahey, S.J. 



56 



The Heights 



The Heights, published by, for, and about, the students of 
the University, for over forty years has presented, clarified, 
and occasionally analyzed the news of the campus. This is its 
primary function and, for this reason, is required reading for 
all who desire to determine the pulse of University activity. 

For the editors the job has always been a difficult one. The 
second-floor lights of the S. A. B. burn far into the night as 
they struggle to meet their deadlines. To the unitiated and 
sometimes to the editors themselves, it seems impossible that 
the University weekly could be published in such surround- 
ings; and yet despite the confusion, it appears on the stands 
every Friday. 

Publication involves the collection, writing, typing, and 
proofing of every significant news and sports story on 
campus; and then wrapping it into a neat and sometimes 
imaginative layout. 

The editors alone have the responsibility of determining 
the editorial policy of the paper. The Heights editorial 
objective is to explain, elaborate upon, and, on occasion, 
criticize events of immediate importance to the University 
at large. Such a policy has met with limited success; the new 
library lighting system, a gift of the students to Pope John, 
was first suggested through the Heights editorial page. 

Perhaps it would be difficult to measure the achievement 
of a University newspaper; but should it consist of present- 
ing the news, of offering a sounding board for student 
opinion, and of presenting thought provoking editorials, 
then in the final analysis, the Heights has been a success. 




Joviality . . . relaxation . . . gay abandon . . . Maa-til 



The Heights. 



Encouragement . . . instruction . . . cigarette smoke . . . comfort 
The Heights. 



T 



Proofreading . . . copy fitting . . . news breaking . . . reporting . . . more decisions 
. . . The Heights. 





Sub Turri 



Amidst the hum of university extra-curricular life, there exist 
organizations whose efforts effect a result that is perhaps more 
tangible than that of others engaged in post-class activity. The most 
obvious among this class are the student publications. A strange, 
indescribable sense of accomplishment and self-satisfaction pecul- 
iar to editorial staffs accompany a weekly, monthly, or quarterly 
publication — the product of, the culmination of, and reward for, 
conscientious effort and, at times, incredible perseverance. 

Such is the case for the staff of the Sub Turri, the yearbook of 
Boston College. In many respects, and in contrast to publishings 
of other campus organizations, the Sub Turri is notably unique. 
For the yearbook appears but once; and in the main, interests only 
a comparatively small segment of the student population, namely 
the seniors. Understandably, it focuses upon, and is directed 
toward them. 

In addition, Sub Turri differs from all other publications in its 
staff and the demands which they must meet if success is to be 
theirs. Built along a loose hierarchical structure, each editor is 
responsible for the layout, artwork, copy and pictures of his par- 
ticular section. Each is a master at demanding, requesting, begging 
and cajoling, responsible only to the grand master of all these arts, 
the Editor-in-Chief, a self-styled, critical wazir of prose, photogra- 
phy, art, cafeteria meals and sundry other fields of equal impor- 
tance. 

Theirs is a job which begins in August, continues through the 
snows, and along with spring, brings a promise of merciful release 
by early March. In the meantime, the "office," blanketed by smoke, 
and resounding to incessant typewriters, is the scene of hurried 
conferences, hushed conversations, endless editorial decisions, and 
the incredibly animated gyrations of the staff as deadlines advance 
relentlessly. 




58 




In a more relaxed and informal pose than is their wont are the staff 
of the 1960 Sub Turri (above) Gerry Hayes, Paul Cunningham, 
Charlie Brophy, Senior Section Editors; Mario DiBelardino, John 
Thompson, Staff; Mary Donovan, Associate Editor; Bill O'Connor, 
Managing Editor; Pat Hall, Section Collector; Walter O'Leary, Adver- 
tising Manager; Paul Campanella, Editor-in-Chief; Bill Perron, Business 
Manager; Bill Kelly, Assistant Business Manager; Chris Morton, 
Academic Section Editor. 



59 




Photography Editor and chief cameraman, Jack Mullen adjusts lenses before scam- 
pering about the campus on another "rush" assignment. 



Frequent staff meetings are an indispensable means of establishing policy, checking 
progress and insuring coordination as the varied steps of production go forward. 
Bill Perron, Paul Campanella, Bill Kelly, Bill O'Connor, Chris Morton, Bob Doyle, 
Faculty Editor; Carol Ford, Associate Editor; Gerry Hayes, Charlie Brophy, 
Bob Keating. 



The current status of his Activities Section together with its 
innumerable difficulties are related to Fr. Devine, Sub Turri 
Moderator, by Bob Keating. 






Activities Editor Bob Keating together with Donna Mason, James 
Cunniff and Mario DiBelardino of the staff toil over the "blueprints" 
drawn up for Bob's section. 



Staff typists Alice Duffy, Susie Magee and Frank Duffy snatch a quick 
breath of air while the dust settles and the smoke clears in the office. 



From this apparently aimless melee is born that "something" 
which is intangible, call it lasting friendship begotten of mutual 
accomplishment, call it satisfaction or even pride. From this 
singular loyalty to class and school is born that "something" which 
is tangible, lasting, — a book portraying Boston College, a book to 
which each staff member can point, and say proudly "This is a 
part of me." — the I960 Sub Turri. 




The Senior Section rapidly takes shape despite the tedious process of 
checking names, pictures, activity lists, graduation lists, college lists, 
and lists for the lists. Charlie Brophy, Gerry Hayes, Walter O'Leary, 
Paul Campanella, Paul Cunningham. 



Some "take five" while others take up 
the momentary slack during frequent 
Friday night bouts with typewriters, lay- 
outs, and other things. 




M 





WILLIAM J. PERRON, JR., Business Manager 



PAUL D. CAMPANELLA, Editor-in-Chief 



WILLIAM O'CONNOR, Managing Editor 




1960 SubTurri 



BOSTON COLLEGE ■ CHESTNUT HILL 67, MASS. 




Dear fellow classmate, 

The year 1960, for the seniors of Boston College, truly marks a 
milestone of success and achievement. In keeping with this year of 
memorable Import, the staff of your yearbook has attempted to present 
to you a unique and distinguished book which. In some measure, strives 
to capture a way of life you have now lived for four years . 

Admittedly, within these pages there are many departures from the 
customary Boston College yearbook format. These changes, we felt, 
were necessary to portray accurately and attractively this campus, and 
all that occurs dally within Its bounds. In no case were such changes 
effected for their own sake; nor were any conscious steps taken to 
violate the hallowed realm of tradition. But simply by conceiving our 
life over the past four years in terms of day-to-day occurences and 
scenes, we have naturally achieved an intended effect of informality, 
of a college pulsating with life, the renewed life of incoming freshmen, 
the mature life of departing seniors . 

To say that such an undertaking, and this, the concrete result of 
incalculable effort , is the product of any one man would be as foolhardy 
as it is unfair. For, though directed toward the seniors, Sub Turri 1960 
is not presented by the class, but by a small portion of this class. To 
these untiring staff members whose capacity for work and sacrifice knew 
no limits, we are indebted beyond measure. To their unwavering and 
selfless loyalty, this Sub Turrl is a tribute. 



Sincerely yours , 







General Interest, Regional 

Organizations 



63 




/ 



i 




Boston College's Senior brothers of the nation-wide fraternity, Alpha 
Kappa Psi, pose in a circle about the co-joined coats-of-arms of the College 
and the fraternity. Officers: (First Row) Paul Cunningham, Treasurer; 
John Joyce, Vice President; Thomas Colligan, President; Nicholas Mas- 
tronardi, Secretary. (Second Row) Robert Patterson, Donald McLellan, 



Walter O'Leary, Joseph Fennelly, Bill Perron, Thomas Gallagher, and 
Wilfred Raymond. (Third Row) John Burke, Bill Donovan, Charles 
Seymour, James Sullivan, John Tracy, and Paul Campanella. (Fourth 
Row) Chris Morton, and Thomas Monahan. 



Alpha Kappa Psi 

The professional business brotherhood of Delta Eta Chapter of 
Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity here at Boston College, together with 
its professional associates in the business world, are dedicated to 
promoting academic courses and research in the field of commerce, 
accounting and finance; and to furthering its members' knowledge, 
while still students, of present business conditions, ethics, and 
policies, — the latter especially in regard to job opportunities 
upon graduation. 

A fraternity in every sense of the word. Delta Eta Chapter has 
a Constitution and Statutory Code, and its own by-laws to which it 
must conform for continued membership and recognition as an 
organ and affiliate of its national parent-organization. 

Prospective brothers are easily recognizable during the six weeks 
of trying pledgeship with their pledge-pin, bright ribbons, furtive 
glances, and cautious meanderings about the campus. 

However, after the formal initiation, the close-knit brotherhood 
settles down to accomplishing the avowed aim of the group. Bi- 
monthly professional meetings at which speakers from various 
facets of industry are presented, and at which the ritualistic func- 
tions so vital to fraternity life are performed, are indicative of 
the active part in campus affairs this organization plays. 

The Fraternity is organically structured and departmentalized 
so that each unit performs its separate function for the overall 
efficiency and betterment of the whole. Such a system consistently 
finds this chapter among the leaders in the efficiency ratings pub- 
lished annually by the Alpha Kappa Psi National Fraternity Office. 

Then, of course, there are the traditional fraternity parties . . . 



Rushees get acquainted with Brothers Kelley and Fitzpatrick (second and 
fourth from left) and the traditions, the high ideals, and the obligations 
entailed with admission to brotherhood. 





Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 

Conscious of the strong attachments of the Irish students to 
traditions, Father Martin P. Harney, S.J., an outstanding scholar 
and historian, founded the Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society in 
1952, with the purpose of preserving and encouraging Gaelic 
culture. The society, (named after the famous archbishop and 
martyr ) , directs its efforts to an increased understanding on the 
part of the students of the social, economic, and religious con- 
ditions of Modern Ireland. Prominent lecturers often appear to 
discuss the various aspects of Irish history and how the latter 
contributed to the development of Western Civilization. 

Sprightly dancing groups study and perform the intricate 
steps so often associated with their lively forebears. A student 
poll would indicate its most popular activity to be the Ceilidhes 
presented three times a year and to which the students of the 
University are invited. Instructions in the fun and foibles of 
Emerald Isle step-dancing are part of the evening's fun. B.O.P. 
has achieved such popularity that it draws its membership 
from students of both Irish and non-Irish heritage. 



Irish faces and Irish eyes smile as Vice President Marie Plunkett enter- 
tains her fellow B.O.P. officers (from left to right) Francis X. Garrepy, 
President; Eileen Tobin, Secretary; Grail O'Connor, Corresponding 
Secretary; and Michael O'Connor, Sergeant-at-Arms. 




"And then, of course, there's Northern Ireland . . ." explains Fr. 
Harney to his circled Gaelic culturalists of the Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society. 



This is the stuff of which a Ceilidhe is made. 




65 




Cadet Officers' Club 

Aimed chiefly at promoting a higher esprit de corps among the 
advanced students of the R.O.T.C, the Cadet Officers' Club was 
established in 1957 by Lt. Colonel Cibotti and Lt. Colonel John 
Leahy. Admittance to the organization is governed by a thorough 
examination of the character and military bearing of the individual 
Cadet. The overall purpose of the Club is to supplement the 
instruction that the future officers receive in the classroom, and to 
convey an extensive picture of what military service entails. 

In addition, the Club also co-sponsors the Corps' basketball 
team, conducts open house during special events at the training 
center, and furnishes aides to assist at the receptions extended to 
visiting dignitaries. Once a year, the Cadets organize and run a 
picnic and field day for the children at the Nazareth Home in 
Jamaica Plain under the direction of Lt. Colonel Merigold. 



Duty, Honor, Country, and Esprit, intangible qualities found in today's Army 
officer, are nurtured for later fruition by this the Cadet Officers' Club. (From 
left to right) Gerald Buckley, Lt. Col. Merigold, Gerald Ferrera, Thomas 
Monahan, President; John Franco, John Carr, James Hayes, Robert Doyle, Jerry 
Spendley, William Melia, James Daly, Robert Winston, Ed Sulesky, and Joseph 
Nadeau. 



Camera Club 



Designed to develop among the students a gteater appreciation 
and undemanding of the field of photography, the Camera Club, 
early in the year, established a well equipped laboratory and 
dark-room in the S. A. B. Here discussion on the varied Techniques 
of photo-reproduction are held bi-monthly in an effort to improve 
its members' agility with camera and photographic equipment. 
The intricacies of developing, printing, and enlarging are demon- 
strated by the veteran club members and occasional guest lecturers. 
Some of the more demanding aspects of photo-science are treated 
through the use of motion pictures. Leading the praise of the 
club's achievements are the many campus publications who both 
use the modern facilities of the dark room and often employ the 
talents of its members in widening the photographic coverage of 
special campus news and sporting events. 




Perfection in the many facets of photo-ptinting technique requite 
long hours in the darkroom. 



Film Society 



It has been said that the only significant art form to emerge 
from twentieth-century American society is that of the motion- 
picture film. In keeping with the long tradition of the University 
and its basis in Western thought, the cinema as presented by the 
Boston College Film Society, has been judged solely on its artistic 
merit and not in the manner of production, however novel, when 
compared with the more established forms of art. Bearing this in 
mind, the Film Society, founded two years ago by Professor 
Sumberg and a small group of students, has successfully endeav- 
ored to bring to the campus the finest in modern film achievement, 
both foreign and domestic. From the earliest pioneering films 
such as Bkth of a Nation, to the Shakespearean productions of 
Hamlet, Julius Caesar, and Henry V, and imports such as Rasho- 
Mon and Rififi, to the modern American successes such as Death 
of A Salesman, The Caine Mutiny, and All the King's Men, the 
Film Society has, in its thrice-nightly Friday showings, consider- 
ably improved the cultural climate. 




Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," typifies the great strides with 
which the Film Society has advanced since its inauguration a few 
seasons ago. (Left to right) Clint Hyer, Francesco Scaduto, Treasurer; 
Mario A. DiBelardino, Director of Publicity; Jack Hurley, Bill Friary, 
President; Dr. Lewis Sumberg, Moderator; Francis Garrepy, and John 
Sheehan, Vice President. 



The Bellarmine Speaking Club was founded at the Evening 
College by the present moderator, Prof. Russell in 1958. The main 
function of the club is not to produce orators but to develop in 
the student an ability to effectively express his ideas whether for 
business, civic, or merely conversational purposes. 

The Club provides opportunities for students, especially those 
interested in administrative positions, to become accustomed to 
speaking before small groups. 

The format of the meetings varies from week to week. At times 



prepared talks are given, at times, the talks are extemporaneous. 
Experience in both modes of speaking, enables the student to gain 
facility in meeting, and coping with a variety of situations. The 
topics range from current events to a discussion of quotable 
quotes. After each member has had an opportunity to speak, the 
floor is opened to an anlysis of, and questions on, the subject 
matter. At the same time, an evaluation of the speaker's technique 
is given in which both strong and weak points are noted. 




Bellarmine Speakers' 
Club 



Evening College students foreseeing the 
need to develop self confidence and to in- 
crease their articulateness in public speaking 
find time during busy schedules to partici- 
pate in the Bellarmine Speakers' Club. 



67 




J * I 



^ 



The growth of the Toastmaster's Circle on our Chestnut Hill 
campus slackened this past year in contrast to its large membership 
a year ago. It still remains, however, one of the more popular 
clubs on the campus, due mainly to the club's practice of allowing 
each member to give a brief talk each week. This served to 
provide the members with more experience in professional atti- 
tudes as well as speaking, and also injected occasional humor and 
personal interest into meetings. A man's ability to convey his ideas 
clearly and persuasively to other men is considered by many to 
be the prime asset of a successful businessman. 

The Toastmaster's Circle, ever aware of this connection between 
success and articularity, strives to make its members aware of this 
relationship, and accordingly, through a process of mutual con- 
structive criticism, directs its efforts toward molding a more 
accomplished speaking ability. 



Maine Club 



The fact that we live in a motor age can often change American 
attitudes towards many things. Take the many glories of the state 
of Maine for an example. At the time of the Revolutionary War, 
Maine, which was then merely a part of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, was admired and respected throughout the colonies as a 
hotbed of anti-British activity. Patriotic glasses were raised in 
toasts to the citizens of Maine at nearly all the meetings of the 
Sons of Liberty. But the industrialization and commercialization 
of two centuries has caused the once-noble image of Maine to be 
spread throughout the North American continent on the license- 
plates of its automobiles as merely a "Vacationland." The members 
of the B. C. Maine Club are proud to report that, after four years 
of hard work, they have overturned this sad condition and are 
able to say confidently that the state of Maine is "a great place to 
live but you wouldn't want to visit there." 



The members of Toastmasters pause and relax before returning to one of 
its many meetings designed to improve its members' speaking techniques. 



Toastmasters , Circle 




"Down Maine Way" provides a ready topic for reminiscing among our 
students away from their home state. (Left to right) Don O'Gendron, 
Rosanna Dawson, Tom Flynn, Kevin O'Neill, Charles Goddard, and Real 
O'Roy. 



The Choral Speakers, an organiza- 
tion unique on campus, pose for 
the Sub Turri camera around Miss 
Mary Kinnane, their exacting di- 
rector who instructs in voice disci- 
pline and unity. 




Campion Choral Speakers 



Unlike the organizations which concern themselves with par- 
ticular academic pursuits, or operate in a sphere of interest for 
the general student body, some groups exist principally because of 
the enthusiasm of a single individual for a particular activity. 
Such is the group known as the Campion Choral Speakers under 
the direction of Moderator Miss Mary Kinnane — a group whose 
interests lie in the age-old, and almost forgotten art of reading 
in chorus. 




The Speakers consist of a select number of male education- 
students who seek to develop their speaking ability, a prerequisite 
for effective teaching; and enjoy the pleasing interplay of speaking 
voices blending together and functioning as one. The scope of the 
Speakers' presentations includes both ancient classical dramas 
expressly written for such presentations, and modern works which 
can be easily adapted to choral patterns. 



W.I.P.R. 

Under the competent direction and guidance of 
Moderator Rev. John Fitzgerald, S.J., new WIPE, 
club members were quite successful in qualifying and 
passing examinations for novice radio-operators. The 
latter then "go on the air" with the crystal-controlled 
novice rig set up at the station. Usually, within the 
year, a general license follows. At the weekly meetings, 
the Club, in addition to treating various business 
questions, customarily holds classes on code and radio 
theory. 

Members of W1PR who belong to the ROTC, have 
a chance to use the equipment of the MARS ( Military 
Affiliated Radio System ) network set up at the station. 
The purpose of MARS is to handle military messages 
in any emergency. 

This year the members of the Club were engaged in 
a project to erect a twenty-ten meter interlaced, ro- 
tating beam-antenna which will permit more distant 
contacts, especially with foreign lands. This addition 
to operating facilities, the Club feels, will encourage 
an increase in membership during future years. 



Excellent equipment, an enthusiastic membership, and a 
familiar C.Q. sum up the elements necessary for a successful 
"ham" station, W.l.P.R. with Bob Greene at the mike. 



69 



Delta Sigma Pi 

Delta Kappa Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 
draws its membership from all majors in the College 
of Business Administration, and from Economics 
majors in the College of Arts and Sciences. Founded 
at New York University in 1907, this business fra- 
ternity established a chapter on the Boston College- 
campus in May of 1957; and has as its organizational 
aims, the fostering of the study of business in uni- 
versities; the encouragement of scholarship, social ac- 
tivity, and the association of students for mutual 
advancement by research and practice; the promotion 
of a closer affiliation between the commercial world 
and students of commerce; and the furthering of a 
high standard of commercial ethics and culture, and 
the civic and commercial welfare of the community. 

Prospective members are given an extensive inter- 
view by a panel of brothers just prior to the time of 
pledge period. On the basis of these interviews, the 
most qualified men are selected for a trial period of 
usually four weeks duration. During this period of 
time, the pledges are given ample opportunity to 
demonstrate their sincerity, and willingness to assume 
the many responsibilities incumbent upon official 
membership. 

After formal initiation ceremonies, which this year 
took place in December, the entire organization, 
through its frequent meetings and extensive program 
of activities, sets about fulfilling a positive program 
whereby both its name and that of Boston College 
may be enhanced through the accomplishment of its 
far reaching aims. 




The executives of Delta Sigma Pi hammer out the evening's agenda during an 
informal pre-meeting conference 




Liberte . . . Fraternite . . . Egalite 
. . . but mostly Fraternite . . . 
Delta Sigma Pi. Peter Johnson, 
President; John MacNamara, Rick 
Pierce, Ed Sulesky, Dick Zilinski, 
Kevin O'Neil, Andy Esposito, Jim 
Norton, Lou Shaw, Bill Sullivan, 
Jim Reilly, Joe Walker, Mike 
Brown, Jim Tonra, Jack Mullen, 
Joe Carty, Secretary; Matt 
Connolly. 



70 



Public Speaking 
Club 

The Public Speaking Club aims at developing 
logical, clear, and persuasive thinking combined with 
proper speaking techniques, and consists of a small 
group of students interested in cultivating a pro- 
fessional speaking ability. 

At weekly meetings, various topics of current inter- 
est are singled out, usually by the president, and 
members selected to present extemporaneously before 
the gathering their views on the subject for approxi- 
mately three or four minutes. After all have partici- 
pated, a critique follows in which delivery and content 
are closely examined and analyzed. In this way, each 
member gains a constructive insight not only into his 
style and its good or bad features, but also into the 
manner in which his views on a particular subject 
compare with those of his fellow-members. 




Frank Vacca's forceful peroration indeed accomplishes its aim, that of an eloquent 
summation — as the facial expressions of his fellow-speakers readily testify. 




The elegance of the staircase in O'Connell Hall is far sur- 
passed by our sophisticated contingent, shown above with 
moderator, Fr. Lawlor, from the Empire State. 



Grouped in such a way so that an imaginative onlooker could conceivably discern 
the outline of their home-state are New York Clubbers: (foreground) Mike 
Brown, Jim Fagan, Tony Cashman (Vice President), Mary Brown (Secretary), 
Jerry Aneskewich (President), Tom Farrell (Treasurer), Pat Booth, Pete 
Morgan, Gerry Hamel, Lou Verde, Barry Mitchell, Nick Mastronardi, Bill Kings- 
bury, Angelo Gagliano, Ned Meara, Bob Adams, Bill Flynn, Tom DellaPenna. 



New York Club 




Regional clubs were first established to spread trte name and 
fame of Boston College to those areas from which students travel 
to the Heights. The large number of students from New York, 
and New Jersey areas is indicative of the University's recent 
growth. The present membership of the New York Club totals 
about 150 students and with the addition of dormitory space for 
an additional one thousand, this number is expected to double 
within the next academic year. 

The Club gives the incoming freshman an opportunity to adapt 



himself to the new surroundings and academic life. The social 
aspect of the Club is of prime concern. Meetings are held twice 
monthly at which time the student is made better acquainted with 
the present activities of the homeland and "fellow countrymen." 
Two banquets a year are held at the Little Hofbrau. During 
Christmas time each year the New York Club's alumni and under- 
graduates gather at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City 
for a festive night of making new acquaintances and meeting 
old friends. 



71 




The relative merits of B.C. and U. Conn, seem just about decided (in favor of 
the Heights, of course), as our cameraman opportunely captured a moment of 
happy smiles and pleasant conversation. 



Connecticut Club 

To most non-residents the sovereign state of Con- 
necticut is the great open space on either side of the 
Merritt Parkway. To the Massachusetts motorist seek- 
ing pleasure or business on the island of Manhattan, 
this area of southern New England is a land of vigor- 
ous traffic enforcement, concrete proof of which fact 
is offered by omnipresent warning billboards that bear 
the message of the inviolability of the law with a 
"this means you" attitude. Such motorists are con- 
stantly on guard for the appearance of motorcycled 
gendarmes who lurk in the darker recesses of the 
pleasantly landscaped highways. But citizens of the 
Nutmeg state know that this is not a fully accurate 
picture of life in their homeland. In order to correct 
what they considered some of the more egregious 
misconceptions, a few of Connecticut's native sons 
and daughters banded together a few years ago and 
with gradually intensifying propaganda activity, suc- 
cessfully managed to dispel this image from the 
collective collegiate imagination. 



What their state lacks in physical area, these men of the 
Rhode Island Club, supply in spirit and loyalty, those price- 
less intangibles so necessary for true sons of a state . . . and 
of a college. 



Rhode Island Club 

With the increasing number of students from other 
parts of the country — and for that matter the world — 
campus organizations and clubs have been formed by 
these students. During the academic year 1958-59 in 
order to foster the interests of the University in Rhode 
Island and to provide a social-academic medium for 
the ever increasing number of students from this 
state and its surrounding areas, the Rhode Island Club 
was formed. During its brief history of only two 
academic years, the club's membership has doubled. 
This is a tribute to the spirit of the members and is 
evidence of well planned activities. 

Throughout the year, the club sponsors various 
social functions including a reception at Christmas, 
a club dance during the second semester and an annual 
outing during the summer. Beginning with the aca- 
demic year I960, the club will undertake a summer 
program to acquaint the incoming freshmen from 
Rhode Island with the upperclassmen. The purpose of 
this program is to welcome, as well as orientate, the 
freshmen to many rewarding friendships at Boston 
College. 




72 





Lewis Drill Team 



The Boston College Color Guard: Al Edmunds, Jim 
Daly, Tom Cummings, Pete Roughan, Commander. 



Thrice First Army, XIII Corps 
drill team champs . . . cadences 
. . . Brasso . . . occasional push-up 
discipline . . . the Boston College 
Lewis R.O.T.C. Drill Team. 



Rod and Gun Club 



In every military organization since the beginning of time, 
there have been a small number who are always in some way set 
apart. They themselves feel that they are an "elite." However, 
such a name, if it is to have meaning, must not be self-imposed, 
but bestowed as just tribute for outstanding accomplishment. 

The Boston College R.O.T.C. has its special group, the Lewis 
Drill Team, an elite organization in every sense of the word. For 
its members, who now number close to a hundred, are a devoted 
corps of men. Countless weekly practices instill the precision and 
"esprit" so necessary for a successful competitive team. 

And successful they have been, winning the XIII Army Corps 
drill championship for the past five years. 

The team also represents the R.O.T.C. at many parades includ- 
ing the festive New York St. Patrick's Parade; participates in 
competitions, and, in general does much honor to the College and 
the Army in keeping with the highest standards of the man whose 
name they proudly bear. 



The annual Turkey and Ham-Shoots sponsored by the campus 
outdoorsmen are well known about the University. But these are 
only of minor significance to the members of the club. One of the 
primary aims of the Rod and Gun club is the teaching of safe 
hunting procedures, the care of firearms, and the observance of 
hunting and fishing laws. Teaching its members by means of films 
on such subjects as duck hunting and bass fishing, the club pro- 
vides opportunities for putting this knowledge to practical use by 
sponsoring skeet-shoots and deep sea fishing trips. Its rifle team, 
composed of the ten best marksmen, competes against similar 
teams from nearby colleges and universities. 



Rod and Gun Club: (Front) Jack 
Miller, President, Ed Lovett, Vice 
President, Bill Hyland. (Rear) Sam 
Panella, Treasurer, Bruce Driscoll, 
Secretary; and Joe Perachi. 




The Towers 

An awareness of the importance of campus publica- 
tions has brought to undergraduate periodicals of the 
University a high degree of competency in reporting 
campus events, news stories, and in many cases, articles 
of considerable literary worth. This is due in great 
measure, to the complex and diverse elements within 
the University itself which have forced publications to 
cater to the interest of various groups. With the move- 
ment to the Heights of the Evening College this past 
fall came the change in the name of its official under- 
graduate publication from the B.C. Eye to The Towers. 
Under the guidance of the Student Council and its 
moderator Mr. George F. Grab, The Towers not only 
carries information concerning current activities but 
has encouraged writing throughout the Evening Col- 
lege by frequently publishing worthwhile literary 
works. Experience in fields of writing, editing, and 
publishing, are helpful but not necessary prerequisites 
for membership on The Towers staff which has con- 
stantly worked to present to the Evening College 
student a complete picture of the University through 
competent reporting of all events of interest. 




The staff of the Evening College publication, The Towers, strike an informal pose 
before the important business of an editorial meeting gets under way. Walter Foley, 
Nancy Helurt, Joseph Bergen, Edward Landers, Lauretta Sweeney, Don Harney, Alec 
Mahr, George Zengo. 



Western Massachusetts Club 



One of the most fabled chain of resorts in the eastern seaboard 
is the "borscht circuit," a series of inns and lodges sprinkled 
throughout the Catskill Mountain area. Since Washington Irving 
was the founder of the unofficial Catskill chamber of commerce, 
an enterprising group of B.C. men founded the Western Mass. 



Club in order to find a similar literary giant who could spread 
attractions of Berkshireland. Unfortunately their plans went awry 
at the 1959 outing commemorating the famous Shays (not to be 
confused with the ill-fated whiskey) Rebellion. 




Western Massachusetts Club: John 
Houlihan, Jim Fagan, Phil Reardon, 
Joe Topor, Vin Kane, Dave Wring, 
Jack Lynch, Anthony Cashman. 



74 




Women's Recreation Association : 
Grail O'Connor, Frances MacCauley, 
Elaine Hurley, Peggy Kuhn, Ruth 
Baumel, Georgia Singer, Jane Shea, 
President; Pauline LeBlanc, Secretary; 
Margaret Leigh, and Terry Malloy. 



Women's Recreation Association 



The Women's Recreation Association is the only "all women" 
club on Campus. Organized to foster integrated athletic and social 
activity, it strives to balance the academic pursuits of the students 
in the School of Education. The scheduling of diversified events 
appeal to a wide segment of the co-eds. Among the sports offered 
are basketball, volleyball, badminton, archery, and golf. Under the 
combined sponsorship of the R.O.T.C. and the W.R.A. an avid 
interest in a rifle team and in individual marksmanship has arisen. 



World Relations League 

The World Relations League features the informal 
panel discussion as its format. By encouraging research 
and new knowledge acquired through their own efforts 
rather than through lectures, the members develop a 
more active interest in, and a more complete under- 
standing of world affairs. For its topics of discussion, 
the League scans news stories and editorial columns of 
the daily newspapers, and utilizes the controversial 
subjects ranging from local politics to international 
affairs in informative panel discussions. For a change of 
pace, the League occasionally sponsors lectures by 
authorities on current world affairs. These lectures 
assist the members considerably in analyzing national 
and international difficulties, and future economic plans. 



The World Relations League seems amicable enough here as 
Frank Vacca, President, announces the topic that will be 
under consideration at the next meeting; however, discussions 
understandably become heated as the League goes about 
solving the world's problems. 



Socially, the girls plan an annual ski trip, dances, bowling 
nights, and parties. Again this past year a cheerleading group was 
initiated by this organization for the Holy Cross rally; and, to say 
the least, was enthusiastically received by the male segment of 
the student body. In view of the concerted efforts of its members, 
the W.R.A. considered the 1959-60 athletic-academic year a 
successful one. 




7S 




Chief Campus Democrat, Marty Nolan (with pipe), unconsciously (or naturally?) 
displays dictatorial tendencies in a gesture toward Jack Matthews — while great danger 
in the form of questionable textbooks lurks and goes unnoticed. 



Young Democrats' Club 

Since it is common knowledge that most political 
opinions of college graduates have their beginnings in 
undergraduate days, it is not surprising that there are 
extra-curricular activities devoted solely to the art and 
practice of politics. The most intensely partisan of 
these is the Young Democrats Club. Founded three 
years ago, the club's purpose and aims are obvious and 
unashamed: the propagation and inculcation in the 
minds of the student body the principles of the 
Democratic Party. 

Like many other activities, the Young Democrats 
Club includes, as a main part of its program, a series 
of lectures, delivered mainly by elected officials of the 
Massachusetts state government and by municipal 
officials of the city of Boston and other surrounding 
communities. These officials, all Democrats to be sure, 
often make a favorable enough impression on the 
Democrats assembled that they eventually recruit 
sizeable numbers of B.C. men in their bids for re- 
election or election to higher office. In addition to this 
practical experience, a main feature of the Y.D.C. 
program is a series of "open forums" that are often 
highlighted by heated and lively debates with advo- 
cates of the "other" traditional American party. 



Rifle Team regulars watch the "bull" down-range as coach, Sgt. Knicker- 
bocker, squeezes a round off. Bob Greene, Bob Capobianco, Jim Fagan, 
Al Edmunds. 





B.C. Rifle Team 



76 



This was the year of the big "clean-up" for the Boston College 
Rifle Team. It was the year of many firsts, many victories, and, 
unfortunately, those inevitable setbacks. No one will forget the 
triangular rifle match against Providence College and the Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island where B.C. scored its most memorable 
victory and learned the importance of THE "1" point. 

The rifle team had a full year, participating in both the Greater 
Boston Collegiate Rifle League and the New England Collegiate 
Rifle League. The faces of riflemen from the Coast Guard Academy, 
U.R.I. , B.U., M.I.T., Northeastern, Brown, and U. Conn., among 
others, are quite familiar to the Eagles' team. For the first half 
of the school year the club registered a 7-7 record against some 
highly competitive teams. 

There are approximately fifteen members of the skilled rifle 
group under the direction of team Captain Robert Capobianco 
and coach Sgt. Knickerbocker of the R.OT.C. Cadre. 



o 




Academic 
Organizations 



7? 



Accounting Academy 

Acclimating oneself to the professional world is one 
of the more demanding tasks that a student must face 
upon leaving college. An outstanding example of an 
activity where the principles of learning acquired in 
class may be applied in a practical and very real sense 
is the Accounting Academy. Concentrating primarily 
on presenting to its members explanations of the 
various fields in which they may work as accountants, 
the Academy has often sought the assistance of pro- 
fessional accountants to discuss the techniques and 
advantages of each of the accounting systems. This 
process of broadening the student-accountant's out- 
look provides a more stable basis upon which he may 
choose his particular area of concentration. The out- 
standing event of the year was the annual business 
luncheon at which Frank Oatway received the Haskins 
and Sells Foundation Award as the top accounting 
student in the University. 




Accounting Academy officers Joe Fennelly and Frank Oatway flank Fr. 
Joyce (center, head-table) at an obviously enjoyable banquet. 



Chemical Society 




The Boston College Chemical Society, an affiliate 
of the American Chemical Society and a member of 
the Intercollegiate Chemical Society, is an organiza- 
tion whose primary object is to provide an oppor- 
tunity to all students, who are genuinely interested in 
chemistry, to become better acquainted with aspects 
not ordinarily discussed in the classroom. The Society, 
while instilling a professional pride in chemistry, pro- 
vides intellectual stimulation arising from professional 
association, and also valuable experience in presenting 
technical material before interested audiences. 

The Chemical Society's program of activity generally 
includes tours to local chemical concerns, frequent 
lectures, panel discussions, and a number of social 
activities throughout the academic year. 

With a view to the future, the Society plans to 
organize student groups for the expressed purpose of 
undertaking extensive research projects with con- 
centrated faculty direction and supervision. 



Members of the Chemical Society happily breathe the fresh 
air outside their home, Devlin Hall. 



Bellarmine Law and 
Government 

The Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy seeks to bring to the campus the views of 
contemporary authorities in government and 
law. Recognizing the dangers of a passive atti- 
tude toward present governmental administra- 
tion, this organization has as its goal the creation 
of awareness in the student body of national 
problems, and encourages the members to seek 
careers in related fields. The bulk of the Bellar- 
mine Academy's interests is directed toward both 
the national and the local scene. Meetings this 
year consisted almost entirely of informal talks 
by representatives of public administration, jour- 
nalism, "pressure groups," politics, law, local 
governmental bodies, law enforcement agencies 
and the civil service. Most of the speakers con- 
centrated on the positions and opportunities 
open to college students, answering any ques- 
tions in this regard posed by those present. 




A timely quip and an interesting talk on the current problems of Massachusetts produce 
affable smiles and an enjoyable meeting for the Bellarmine Law and Government Academy. 



Dedicated and articulate scientists gather to produce the college's science journal, 
Cosmos, in the best liberal arts tradition. 



Cosmos 



Founded with the assistance of Rev. William V. E. 
Casey, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
Cosmos is the newest of the University's many publica- 
tions. Replacing former science journals, it was first 
introduced to the student body during the spring of 
1959. Its impact was widely felt because of a greater 
concentration of effort and a free interchange of ideas. 
Comparable with most of the University's journals it is 
strictly a student publication. It grants the interested 
student an opportunity to present his findings in exact- 
ing scientific fields which range from Mathematics 
to Psychology; and attempts to stimulate scientific 
curiosity in the general student-body as well. A sur- 
prisingly large number of articles engage the interest 
of the average reader, and even those with a non- 
scientific background. The publication is especially 
noteworthy for its clear presentation of technical in- 
formation and is to be commended for bravely under- 
taking the task of acquainting the campus-at-large 
with some of the experimentation that is being carried 
on in the dark recesses of Devlin. 




79 




Economics 
Academy 



GNP . . . recession . . . investment 
. . . fiscal policy . . . aggregate de- 
mand . . . the Economics Academy. 



During the first semester, with careful planning, and able direc- 
tion of moderator, Professor Bourneuf, the Economics Academy 
presented an enlightening and informative series of guest lec- 
turers featuring some of the most prominent economists in the 
nation. 

After the opening lecture by Professor Seymour Harris on 
"U.S. Economic Policy since 1952," the Academy presented Everett 
Hagen, Arthur Smithies, Professors Bergson and Deusenberry, 
followed in the second semester by Robert Silow of M.I.T., Paul 



Samuelson of Harvard, Richard Caves of the University of Cali- 
fornia, and Rawson Wood, the final speaker. 

Membership in the Academy now stands unofficially at one 
hundred members, thus constituting one of the largest extra- 
curricular groups on campus. 

The long awaited annual banquet and spirited panel discussion 
closed out the year's activity which gave promise of even greater 
accomplishments in the immediate future. 




English Academy 

The English Academy, now in its second year, does 
not have a long tradition; however, it has rapidly 
established a reputation for excellence. Composed of a 
select group of juniors and seniors recommended by 
both the Moderator, Mr. Leo Hines, and the chairman 
of the English Department, Professor Richard Hughes, 
its object is to present the best in lectures, seminars, 
and readings not only to the students in the field of 
English literature, but also to all interested students 
and their guests. The lectures and seminars given by 
faculty members covered a wide range of subject 
matter, from "The Death Wish in Romantic Poetry" 
to "The Fifteenth Century Chaucerians." from "Bibli- 
cal Symbolism in the Novels of Cooper" to "The 
Poetry of Hart Crane." The Academy, through a grant 
from the Humanities Series, also featured readings by 
four of America's rising young poets: Edwin Honig, 
Paul Petrie, George Starbuck, and William Alfred. 

The English Academy also continued its format of 
active student participation at all the meetings, a 
practice which is one of the Academy's standard pro- 
cedures. In each of the programs, emphasis is placed 
upon the contribution of the individual student who is 
expected to be familiar with the evening's topic, and 
prepared to take part in the informal discussion which 
usually concludes each meeting. 



President Joe Tribble (standing) introduces poet Edwin 
Honig (second from right), to members and friends of the 
Academy as moderator, Mr. Leo Hines, looks on (third from 
right). 



Graduate Nurses' 
English Academy 

Founded to develop a student-appreciation of the 
world's literary achievements, and of the importance 
to technical studies of a broad cultural background, 
the Graduate Nurses' English Academy is unique in 
that it attempts to foster a lasting interest in literary 
works — an interest comparatively foreign to the 
Nursing student's major field of concentration. 

However, this is in no sense a barrier to the student 
who realizes the liberal arts tradition of living a more 
meaningful life and of greater vocational achievement 
through a healthy diversification of interests. 

Under the direction of moderator, Dr. Clara M. 
Siggins, the Academy, during its frequent meetings, 
discusses books and plays not only in the popuar vein, 
but also works of great authors of the classical tradi- 
tion. Probably more important and more interesting 
to its members is the methodic analysis of the values 
and standards by which works of literature are judged. 

Membership in the Academy is based on scholastic 
achievement as well as interest and participation in the 
activities of the club itself. 




Graduate Nurses flash smiles for the Sub Turri cameraman during a less serious moment 
of their English Academy meeting. 




Finance Club 



President Al Bernazani (standing), 
has the floor during a Finance Club 
meeting in C.B.A. library. 



Undoubtedly the largest extra-curricular organization in the 
College of Business Administration, the Finance Club, designed 
primarily for those students who are majoring in Financial Ad- 
ministration, each year plans and executes a practical series of 
lectures and trips for its membership. 

Prominent speakers from the business world, guided tours of 
local financial institutions culminating in an annual safari to Wall 
Street with its brokerage houses, stock exchanges, and countless 



banks, highlight the Club's year of activities. 

On the individual level, personal initiative in the form of 
research and analysis into such fields as the money market and 
stock market is encouraged. 

Frequent meetings, thorough planning, and an enthusiastic 
membership, all combine to indicate that the Finance Club pos- 
sesses the ideal extra-curricular pulse of this or any University. 



SI 




Historical Society: Phil Suarez, Paul Judge, Joe Vidoli, Fr. Mahoney, S.J., Prof. 
O'Connor, Pho Ba Hai, Mike Dorney. 



German Academy 

Today the knowledge of the German language for 
advancement in the field of science is not the sine 
qua non it was two decades ago. Yet, a knowledge of, 
and a facility with, the language is still a definite help 
to the scientist since much of the great scientific 
theories, both classical and current, remain to be 
gleaned from works still in the original German. 

Much can be learned from the German people; from 
their culture; their literature; and their history. Today, 
more than ever, post-war Germany is emerging as an 
area of crisis and of constant challenge to world peace. 
The Academy, in an attempt to stimulate in its 
members a keenness of perception and judgment in 
regard to Germany's problems, and to satisfy the 
German linguist's desire to take part more fully in 
the culture that is the object of his study, presents a 
varied program of lectures, recordings, and discourses 
by noted speakers. 



Historical Society 

The Historical Society derives its membership not 
only from history majors as such, but from those who 
find the study, discussion, and interpretation of his- 
torical events a stimulating intellectual challenge. The 
society features as a main part of its program a series 
of bi-monthly discussions in which original papers are 
prepared by members. These research projects are 
often verbally dissected by the other members; and in 
the ensuing defense and rebuttal the picture can often 
become similar to that of early Church councils where 
papal delegates often found it expedient and necessary 
to escape through side windows after reading the 
papal decree. But such outbursts of intellectual anima- 
tion soon settle down to a dull roar at a few raps of 
the gavel of Professor O'Connor, the society's mod- 
erator. However, the analysis continues, whether it 
concerns the effectiveness of the St. Bartholomew Day 
massacre, the cause of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, 
or the extent of the influence of his court over the 
decisions of King Louis XIV. 




Before dispersing the German Academy pauses outside Campion Hall to arrange 
the next meeting. 



82 



One of the newer publications in the 
University, The Educational Review, 
absorbs the attention of its staff just 
prior to publication. John Thompson, 
Charles Robinson, Anne Kicin (Co- 
editor), Patricia Stankunas (Editor), 
Doris Robinson, Nancy Bonnazzoli, 
Gregg Voci. 



Educational Review 

The official academic publication of the School of Education is 
its Educational Review. This magazine appears annually in order 
to further three aims. First, it fosters a professional attitude of 
the school's future teachers. Secondly, it serves to stimulate original 
student research. Finally, it encourages the students to present 
articles relevant to the field of Education. 

Since its founding four years ago by the Dean of the School of 
Education, Father Donovan, the magazine has continually im- 
proved by the changing or the enlarging of its format. Initially a 
mimeographed booklet, it is now a printed magazine requiring a 
permanent staff. Changes are apparent from a rapid scanning of its 
contents. Within, we find a description of the latest issues, trends, 
and events in the "Eye on Education" section. Also, the "Features 
Department" gives broader treatments to the various specialized 
areas of this field. The last, and in some ways the most impressive 
change, is the expansion of the "Book Alcove" which summarizes 
and reviews the latest books in all areas of Education. An indica- 
tion of the improvements and of the skills of the present staff can 
be found by comparing the publications of other colleges in the 
field with that of Boston College. The results are excellence in 
overall content by virtue of a professional approach to its varied 
and informative articles. 




Le Cercle Fran^ais 



Le Cercle Frangais, perhaps better known as the French Club, 
has set for itself a two- fold goal: that of increasing its members' 
proficiency in both written and spoken French; and that of study- 
ing, explaining, and analyzing the many facets of French culture. 
This latter aim traverses the sterile realm of mere intention 
through the use of films depicting the French way of life, readings 
exemplifying French literary style, an ambitious program of guest 
speakers who delve inro the influence of Modern France upon the 
world at large, and group discussions in which all members 
participate. 

On the less academic side, the Club-year was highlighted by 
three stage presentations, the first, "L' Anglais Tel Qu' on Le 
Parle" starring John Nickross. On the same program Pierre Morin 
appeared in, "La Farce du Couvier," followed later in the year by 
"La Paix Chez Soi" with Geraldyne Amore and John Nickross; 
and "La Poudre Aux Yeux" with Paul Hudon, Jan Hermans, 
William Friary, Edith Cackowski, Mary Hines, and Arthur Milano. 

The Club numbered among its most notable accomplishments a 
lecture on French literature by the late Dr. Albert Camus; and 
concluded its year of activities with a poster exhibit representing 
the various commercial features of "La Belle France." 




The language lab is put to excellent 
use as the members of Le Cercle 
Francais strive for perfection in "la 
langue francaise." 



S 1 . 




The Foreign Trade Club looks on a 
bit skeptically as Pete Johnson gives 
his considered opinion on the state 
of international commerce. Joseph 
Walker, Peter Johnson, President; 
John McAuliffe, Anthony Cashman. 



Foreign Trade Club 



The Foreign Trade Club, after what its members termed as a 
"chronic" late start, proceeded to plan a most promising year, 
under the direction of Moderator, Dr. Albery. 

A slate of such notable speakers as the German General Consul 
and Mr. R. L. Belleveau, Director of Marketing for the Interna- 
tional Division of United Shoe Machinery appeared before inter- 
ested Club members. The "Traders" also conducted their annual 



voyage on the Boston pilot boat to examine port facilities for 
handling foreign freighters laden with U. S. imports. 

During the year steps were also taken by the Foreign Trade 
Club to merge with the World Relations League. However, though 
the merger plans seemed feasible at the outset, minor differences 
and scheduling difficulties made the move virtually impossible. 



Italian Academy 




The Italian Academy presented a variety of inter- 
esting subjects designed to supplement the foreign 
language curriculum, and to promote a deeper appre- 
ciation of the art, culture, language and history of 
Italy. Through a well rounded program, these objec- 
tives were realized. During the first week of every 
month a business and program meeting was held 
under the direction of Dr. Joseph Figurito in order 
to make preparation for the weekly meetings. The 
latter included topics concerning education, art and 
architecture in Italy. One meeting was devoted entirely 
to Italian music and opera. During March the club 
was fortunate to have as a guest the former Italian 
consul to the United States. In preparation for Yule- 
time, Christmas customs, food, clothes, and events of 
Italy were spotlighted and discussed. A Christmas 
party, an annual outing and frequent pizza parties 
supplemented the weekly gatherings. 




Italian Academy Officers: Louis Massaro, Treasurer; Richard 
Grieco, President; Nancy Bonnazzoli, Secretary; Nino Di 
lanni, Vice-President. 



Psychology Club 

The interest of the Psychology Club centers around 
a general dissemination of basic knowledge rather 
than in extensive investigation of any particular area. 
It attempts to bring the modern methods and facts of 
Psychology to the general student body. By instituting 
a series of films and lectures of general student appeal, 
the club capitalized on the ever increasing interest of 
the layman in the field of Sociology, and Psychiatry as 
well as in Psychology. It has thus attracted to its mem- 
bership well over one hundred students representing 
every department of the University. Two particular 
areas of principal concern, juvenile delinquency and 
alcoholism, received close treatment from experts of 
the Youth Service Board and State Alcoholic Com- 
mission during Club lectures. 




New laboratory equipment is always a source of interest and conversation for Psychology 
Club members. Dr. Cautela, Jim Lianos, Tom May, Bill Rohan, John Miller. 




Journal of Business 

The Journal of Business, a student publication of 
the College of Business Administration, is devoted 
principally to questions of business theory and prac- 
tice, and to problems of political economy. With so 
broad an area to be covered, the Journal was somewhat 
hampered in its efforts to fully realize its goals because 
of a lack of senior writers and experienced under- 
classmen. 

Appearing in December, the first issue, it was gen- 
erally conceded, did well with the reservoir of material 
available to it. After the smoke cleared away, the 
second issue, more stylish, energetic, and professional, 
than the first, had as its dominant theme the current 
labor scene with eye-witness reports of labor condi- 
tions, and a lengthy analysis of the contracting 
industry. 

Both Journals represented an aggressive attempt to 
escape term-paper material; and when this publication 
followed its announced aims, it achieved its best 
results. 



A Sub Turri candid captures the staff of the Journal assuming 
their "business-as-usual" positions. (Front row) John Mc- 
Auliffe, Ed Powers, Managing Editor; (second row) Peter 
Johnson, Editor-in-Chief; James Tonra; (third row) Gerry 
Buckley, John Provosoli; (fourth row) Bill Kelly, Co-Editor; 
Bill Perron, Co-Editor. 



85 



r~~> 




Marketing Club members supplement classroom work with practical work and advice 
from Dr. Price, Moderator. (First Row) Walter H. O'Leary, President; Dr. Gerald Price, 
Moderator; Barry Mitchell, Treasurer; (Second Row) Paul Hughes, William Donovan, 
Co-ordinator; William Burns, Brian Gilligan; (Stairs) Daniel Thibault, John Faherty, 
Thomas Callaghan, James Driscoll, Secretary; Leonard Marma, Vice-President; Henry 
McAuliffe. 



Marketing Club 

The Marketing Club is concerned directly and im- 
mediately with the business world. A unique feature of 
this club is to be found in its emphasis on technique 
rather than theory. Concentrating on practical prob- 
lems and on explanations of current markets, together 
with advice on job opportunities in the professional 
business world, the Marketing Club features informal 
discussions of marketing operations in today's complex 
economic world. The purpose of these discussions is 
to supplement the Club members' working knowledge 
of marketing operations in actual practice. 

The high-point for members comes each year at the 
Annual Distribution Conference in downtown Boston 
where, in recognition for his scholastic excellence, the 
student with the highest average in the Marketing 
course is presented an award. 



Russian Academy 



Confronted with an explosive world situation, not a day passes 
that we fail to read of social unrest, national rebellions, brushfire 
wars or sputniks. Russia is undoubtedly our chief concern, 
whether she be our economic competitor, ideological rival, or 
military foe. Whether we like it or not, we must face the reality 
that this competition exists. The student who speaks the Russian 
language fluently and knows the Russian heritage and tradition is 
highly regarded and keenly sought. He is a must in the diplomatic 
corps. Recently courses in Russian were added to the curriculum 



at Boston College. To enable the interested student to develop his 
background in Russian culture and give foundation to the prin- 
ciples he is receiving in academic pursuits, the Russian Academy 
was established. Early this past October, under the direction of 
Mr. Myron Ricci, instructor of the Russian language, officers were 
elected and a Program Committee established. Because of the 
; nitial success this organization has experienced, a bright future 
5 foreseen for its 170 members. 



Prominent speakers such as Prof. 
Dziewanowski supply answers to the 
pertinent queries regarding the many 
facets of the U.S.S.R. 




Mendel Club 

The Mendel Club, named in honor of the author of 
the Mendelian laws of heredity, is the official academy 
for those students majoring in the biological sciences. 
As such, its members are intersted in pre-medical, pre- 
chemistry work or in continuing the biological courses 
to the graduate level in anticipation of a research or 
teaching post. 

Regular weekly meetings are held at which time 
members of the medical, dental, and allied professions 
come to the campus and present to the student prac- 
tical aspects of their chosen field, and attempt to 
impart a tangible awareness of their goal. 





Posing with Fr. Drury, Moderator, within the shadow of Gasson 
tower, the pre-meds consent to leave intetior Devlin Hall, but not 
too far from demanding labs, experiments, and text-books. 



Pre-medical student, Tom McLean, listens attentively to Fr. Drury's advice 
regarding post-graduation plans for medical school. 



Ricci Mathematics Academy 



The Ricci Mathematics Academy is named after a 
renowned Jesuit missionary-mathematician in China 
during the early days of The Society of Jesus. The 
Academy aims to impart a cultural background which 
will enable those interested students to appreciate the 
recent significant developments in the mathematical 
world. Limited in the modes of presentation because 
of the theoretical aspects of math, the lecture system, 
combined with practical demonstrations is almost 
exclusively utilized to present the cultural, historical, 
and philosophical background of this subject. Fr. 
Stanley Bezuszka, S.J., recipient of large grants to aid 
in the revamping of mathematical instruction in our 
elementary and secondary school systems, introduces 
the club members to new instructional approaches and 
how they possibly might be influential in the future. 
The club also attempts to give to the freshman and 
sophomore a fuller appreciation of mathematic sci- 
ence, showing how the individual segments of the 
science harmonize together. In a lighter vein the 
members at times adjourn to the local speakeasy to 
solve the most recently acquired formula over a glass 
of dark and a bag of symmetrical pretzels. 

Ricci Mathematics Academy: Donald Armstrong, Vice Presi- 
dent; Daniel Heafey, June Robinson, Fr. Bezuszka, Modera- 
tor; Eleanor Downey, Janet Coleman, Treasurer; John 
Benedetto, President; Mike Callahan. 




87 




A time and motion study absorbs the attention of S.A.M.'s devotees, with much 
computation and analysis to follow. 



Society For The 

Advancement Of 

Management 

The Society for the Advancement of Management 
is a professional business society dedicated to fostering 
and advancing managerial policies and principles. 
Like many of the clubs from the College of Business 
Administration, a close affiliation is maintained be- 
tween the organization and the major field in which 
the student is concentrating. The student then is able 
to relate the activities of the club to that of the 
curriculum. 

S.A.M. has the advantage of offering post-graduate 
membership thus facilitating an interchange of ideas 
between its 168 members and men who are currently 
engaged in business. Some of the varied activities of 
this organization include business seminars, tours of 
enterprising business corporations, speaker programs, 
discussion of practical top management problems and 
policies, and student analysis of problem areas. S.A.M. 
also publishes The Executive and numerous manage- 
ment newsletters. A nationally recognized society with 
student chapters at most of the leading universities, 
the Boston College chapter has consistently placed 
among the top ten in national ranking. 



St. Mark's Academy 

Just as the college of Business Administration 
claims as its own, fraternities and organizations de- 
signed to promote interest in, and knowledge of, the 
business world, so too the School of Education boasts 
of the St. Mark's Academy, an organization which 
concerns itself not with business "per se," but with 
business education. Considerable effort is directed 
toward the solution of technical problems arising from 
business education. 

During the year, studies are undertaken pertaining 
to the mechanical and visual aides which can be used 
to improve both the content and methodology associ- 
ated with the teaching of business courses in high 
school. Although not as active as its C. B. A. counter- 
parts, St. Mark's Academy, through its business-social 
meeting each month, has effected an imposing and 
envied series of guest lecturers. Functioning almost as 
an extension of the Education curriculum, the Academy 
offers profitable opportunities to its members to 
acquaint themselves with the practical problems in- 
herent in, and the solution necessary to, the successful 
teaching of business subjects. 



Stalwarts of St. Mark's Academy, brave December snows, 
and occasional wintry winds, before repairing to Campion 
and another meeting designed to perfect business-course 
techniques. 





Honor Societies, 
Sodalities, 

Governments 




Honor 
Societies 



•' ^iMwri^ 



¥ 



Ok ■© 




Alpha and Omega 



The most recent addition to the many campus organizations 
founded to give recognition for academic achievement is the 
School of Education's Alpha and Omega Honor Society — a group 
whose purpose it is to honor those future teachers who have best 
fulfilled the motto of Boston College, "Ever to excel." At the 
beginning of each academic year the Society's new members are 
initiated at the official welcoming Installation Dance, where the 
aims and purposes of the group are redefined: the intellectual and 
cultural development of each member. 

In addition to sponsoring frequent receptions for Dean's List 
and Honors Seminar students, Alpha and Omega is well known 
about the campus for its ambitious program of activities among 
which the most noteworthy are academic contests and the yearly 
School of Education Symposium. 

An apt portrayal of the high ideals of this organization is to 
be found in their symbol of membership, a gold key signifying 
truth and learning. 



Alpha and Omega, School of Education Honor Society: (Front) Joan 
Lawrie, Pat Carty, Pat Stankunas, Maureen Keohane, Anna Recupero; 
(rear) Maurice Daly, Louise Boyle, Carol Greene, Charles Robinson, 
Dr. Ferdinand Rousseve, Moderator; Mary Brown, Edith Cackowski. 




Alpha Sigma Nu, National Jesuit Honor Society: Hans Hermans, Dick Bentley, George Litman, 
Joe Tribble, Tony Chen, Fr. MacGillivray, Moderator; Bill Melia, Bob O'Leary, Don Palmer, Bob 
Berry, Brian Moran. 



Alpha Sigma Nu 

Unquestionably, the most exclusive and most respected of all 
the University's honor societies is Alpha Sigma Nu, the National 
Jesuit Honor Fraternity. Each year, less than one percent of the 
entire graduating class is elected for membership in the society. 
The criteria for selection are three: scholarship, loyalty, and 
service. Members are chosen for their proficiency in studies, their 
interest in extra-curricular activities and their steadfast devotion 
to the University itself. Perhaps no more outstanding examples of 
the rigorous Jesuit system of education are to be found within or 
without the University. Invariably Alpha Sigma Nu numbers 
among its members the students who, in addition to their high 
scholastic standing, are most active in the direction of the Uni- 
versity's clubs and publications. Alpha Sigma Nu signifies three 
years of labor reaching fruition; it is a symbol of achievement in 
every respect. 



Bob O'Leary, Vice President, holds the interest of Don Palmer, President; Bill 
Melia, Secretary-Treasurer; and Fr. MacGillivray, Moderator; as he relates his 
Christmas adventures in Merrie England. 





Omicron Chi Epsilon, Economics Honor Society: Don Palmer, Dan Murphy, Bob Berry, Tim Burns, 
Dick Carton, Bob OXeary, Bob Doyle, Coleman Foley, John Walgreen, Bill Melia, (sitting) Prof. 
Bourneuf, Frank Pettee. 

Omicron Chi Epsilon 

Omicron Chi Epsilon bestows distinction upon outstanding stu- 
dents majoring in Economics. Requirements that must be met 
before admission to the society is granted include a cumulative 
B average, with at least a similar average in Economics; and in 
addition, the submission and oral presentation of a paper on 
Economics before the Executive Council. The aims of this society 
coincide with those of Beta Gamma Sigma — to advance the 
education of Business students and to create an atmosphere of 
high ideals and noble purpose in the business world. 

Beta Gamma Sigma 

Beta Gamma Sigma, a national fraternity giving special recogni- 
tion to those who have attained excellence in collegiate business 
schools, is now in its fourth year at Boston College. Election to 
membership, which represents the highest scholastic honor that 
may be won by a student in commerce and business, is based solely 
on academic performance; and, at the end of the junior year, the 
top four percent of the class is initiated into the society. After the 
first semester of senior year an additional six percent are chosen. 

Beta Gamma Sigma, besides rewarding scholarship on the col- 
legiate level, aims at the advancement of education in the art and 
science of business, and to foster integrity in the conduct of 
business administration. 




91 



Beta Gamma Sigma, Business Honor Society: (Seated) Bob Berry, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer; Dick Bentley, President; Bill Melia, Vice President; Mr. 
Glynn, Moderator; Mr. Conway, Registrar; (standing) Tom Rock, Tom 
Sharkey, Francis Oatway, Paul Rigazio, Paul Deady, Dan Campbell, 
Steve Sullivan. 



Sigma Pi Sigma 

Of the many honor societies within the University, 
there are two that are devoted primarily to the recog- 
nition of academic achievement: The Order of the 
Cross and Crown and Sigma Pi Sigma. 

The official honor society of the College of Arts and 
Sciences is the Order of the Cross and Crown com- 
posed of those seniors who have distinguished them- 
selves through selfless participation in University 
activities while maintaining an exemplary record of 
scholastic achievement. The student possessing the 
highest honors, the Knight Commander, is delegated 
to serve as Student Marshal at Commencement along 
with the next four highest members who act as Assist- 
ant Marshals. Cross and Crown membership is one of 
the highest honors the College bestows in recognition 
of achievement and in gratitude for loyalty. 

Sigma Pi Sigma, the national Physics honor society 
may also be numbered as a selective group that ap- 
points to its ranks those physics students who have 
excelled in their field. In order to encourage among its 
members a deeper professional interest, students are 
afforded the opportunity to present technical papers 
of merit, and to hear experts lecture on the relentless 
progress taking place in modern science. 




Sigma Pi Sigma, Physics Honor Society: Tony Chen, Paul Payson, Bob Looney, Walter 
Colantuono, Tom Birmingham, Fred Williams, Tom Flynn, Dr. Frederick White, 
Patrick Collins, Stephen Dean, Bernie Plansky, Don Burke, Al Hyland, (kneeling) John 
Daley, Zygmunt Poczatek. 



Order Of The Cross and Crown 



The Order of the Cross and Crown, Arts and Sciences Honor Society: 
(First row) Fr. Alexander Duncan, S.J., Joseph Tribble, Knight Com- 
mander; George Litman, Stephen Dean, (second row) Brian Moran, 
Marshal; Tom Birmingham, Marshal; Joe Vidoli, Joe Walker, Don Burke, 



Bill Falla, (third row) Mike Dorney, Paul Judge, Bernard Plansky, John 
Benedetto, (fourth row) Bob Doyle, Michael Gormley, Paul Campanella, 
Marshal; Malcolm Collins, (fifth row) Al Hyland, Jim Reilly, Bill Rohan, 
William Friary, Al Healey, John Miller. 




93 



i^MttWteSi* 




Sodalities 



Dr. Dooley receives coat of arms and a check during his Sodality-sponsored visit to the Campus: 
Thomas McLean, Rev. George Drury, S.J., Rev. J. Frank Devine, S.J., Thomas Galvin, Patricia Kenny, 
Stephanie Gregory, Dr. Dooley, Charles Glashausser. 





Fr. Devine, Moderator, exhorts members of the Sodality to fashion their 
spiritual lives after that of Mary Immaculate, their patroness. Michael 
Gormley, Secretary-Treasurer; Thomas Galvin, Prefect; Rev. J. Frank 
Devine, S.J., Moderator; Jack Wichenbaugh, Vice Prefect; Edward Powers, 
Francis X. Garrepy. 



Sodalists' problems, be they spiritual or scholastic, are unburdened to 
Fr. Devine, a ready listener, a valued friend, and reliable advisor, par 



Men's Sodality 



The Sodality of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception is an 
embodiment of the Christian principle that the service of Christ 
is an integral part of one's daily life. Accordingly its activities and 
interests transcend what might be termed "the ordinary student 
life." 

The activities of the Sodality began during the summer when it 
hosted the Boston Congress of the Lay Apostolate. This week-long 
international congress was concerned with the methods of con- 
cretizing the precept "Go, therefore, and teach all men," a goal 
sought throughout the entire year. 

The Sodality has attempted to improve upon the spiritual and 
the intellectual atmosphere of the campus by providing readers 
and servers for the daily Masses, by sponsoring closed-retreats, by 
teaching Christian doctrine to high school students, by raising 
money to pay for the transportation of Boston College graduates 
who will teach in Jamaica, by conducting a Christmas drive to 
provide dinners for needy families in Boston, and by establishing 
a tutorial bureau to help freshmen with their srudies. 

Undoubtedly the highlight of the Sodality year was the sponsor- 
ship of an inspiring talk given by Dr. Thomas Dooley, the tireless 
founder of MEDICO. Through Sodalists' efforts, over $400 was 
presented the doctor to assist him in his hospital work in Laos. 

For those students who join a club to participate more actively 
in campus life a great many organizations are adequate. But the 
Sodality offers its members a complete "way of life" which, with 
effort, acquires depth during college days; and when these are past, 
provides a road to spiritual heights. 





Women's Sodality 

As one of the thousands of groups that arose in 
answer to the promulgation of the official constitution 
of Sodalities, the Boston College Women's Sodality 
forms a vital link in the Archdiocesan chain of col- 
legiate Sodalities. Moderated by Rev. Joseph F. 
Donohue, S.J., the Women Sodalists pursue the three- 
fold goal of personal sanctification, sanctification of 
others, and to a certain extent, defense of the Church. 
In addition to following a daily spiritual program, 
each Sodalist participates actively in the apostolic 
projects of the group. Group activities during the past 
years were: a Christmas collection for the Puerto 
Ricans of Boston, periodic days of recollection, monthly 
work with retarded children, a fall tea for women 
students, a November mixer, an Advent lecture for 
all students, and an annual Mother-Daughter Com- 
munion Breakfast on Sodalist-Reception day. 



Rosary . . . cell meetings . . . Campion Chapel . . . Women's Sodality. 



Christian Doctrine 



Instructors 



In cooperation with the Boston College Sodalities, students in 
the Christian Doctrine Instructor Program aid in shaping and 
developing the lives and minds of grammar school children of the 
Catholic community within the framework of elementary cate- 
chetical studies. 

Each member of the Instructor Group, after assignment to a 
parish within the Archdiocese, travels to his classroom meeting 
composed of young boys and girls whom he will instruct in the 
fundamentals of Faith. Informed sources reveal that oftentimes the 
interests and attention of these youngsters is far removed from the 
subject matter at hand. However, patience, gradual success, and 
ultimately a rewarding sense of achievement are great spurs for 
this group which prefers anonymity rather than the acclaims of 
fellow students. 

For these Instructors we have nothing but highest praise. 



Socialists, such as Gerry Hayes, double as Christian Doctrine 
Instructors devoting many hours of teaching to grammar 
school and high school students. 



96 





Socialists from the dorms receive parting words of advice 
after meeting in Lyons Hall: (second left) Charles Glas- 
hausser, Prefect; (center) Bob Hart, Vice Prefect; (fourth 
left) Anthony Chen, Secretary-Treasurer; Fr. Devine, 
Moderator. 

Resident Students' 



Sodality 



A deeper holiness of life, a more effective instru- 
ment for the lay apostolate — these are goals to which 
all Socialists aspire. These are the aims of participants 
in the Resident-Students' Sodality, a member of the 
newly formed Federation of Archdiocesan Sodalities. 

A daily process of fashioning oneself to the image 
of Christ is required so that He, His ideals, and the 
fullness of His life may be better known through the 
words and works of the Sodalist. This is the challenge 
of the Apostolate, a challenge met on the spiritual, 
academic, and social levels by the Resident-Students' 
Sodality with such projects as daily dialogue-Masses, 
panel discussions for freshmen under the tutelage of 
the A.&S. and C.B.A. guidance offices, First Friday 
Nocturnal Adoration programs, nightly rosaries, and 
participation in Sodality Day at Fairfield University. 

In early March, this Sodality in conjunction with 
organizations from surrounding colleges was instru- 
mental in sponsoring a Newman Club Catholic 
Colleges Forum at the Heights. 




Evening 
College 
Sodality 



Evening College Sodality: (front) 
Virginia O'Connell, Treasurer; Rev. 
Daniel R. Cummiskey, S.J., Director; 
Mary Faith Baker, Prefect; Marilyn 
Fitzgerald, Secretary; (rear) James 
Mclntyre, J. Leland Cawthorne, 
Marion O'Malley, Mary Hogan, Marie 
DuMont, William Riley, M. Virginia 
Hanley, William Looney, Robert 
Byrne, Velia DeCesare, Eugene Mc- 
Laughlin. 



Sodalities were founded in order to give the faithful 
a definite mode of life whereby Christ could be imi- 
tated. In order to give the students of various colleges 
within the University an opportunity to learn and 
follow this prescribed mode, each has established its 
own Sodality. 

Under the direction of Rev. David Cummiskey, the 
Evening College Sodality offers countless opportuni- 
ties for the students' spiritual enrichment by sponsor- 



ing days of recollection, and in conjunction with the 
student Council, an annual Retreat, daily rosaries, 
monthly Communion breakfasts, Holy Hours, and at 
Christmas, in imitation of the charitable Christ, by 
preparing food-baskets for needy families. 

The Sodality's increasing membership is a mani- 
festation of the measure of success this group has 
attained during the past year as it accomplishes the 
blessed work of the lay apostolate. 



97 



Graduate Nurses' 
Sodality 

Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary 
and devoted to the personal sanctification 
of its members, the Graduate Nurses' So- 
dality exists in order that a truly spiritual 
aristocracy may flourish in the Nursing 
profession. Members meet periodically for 
informal talks or general discussion. As 
individuals, the Sodalists are expected to 
perform each day certain duties, which 
include Mass and Communion, the recita- 
tion of the Rosary, and the practice of 
mental prayer. In the care of the sick there 
can be the highest personal fulfillment; in 
being Christ-like, one can lead the sick to 
Him, the great Healer. 




The Graduate Nurses learn how to best apply Sodalist principles to their daily lives in 
the wards of Boston's hospitals. 



Feast Day and Sunday Masses require practice for the Dorm Students' Schola. 



Resident Students' 
Choir 

Since the turn of the century, increased emphasis 
on the part of recent Popes has been placed upon the 
return of our Catholic musical heritage to its proper 
place in the modern Church's Liturgical life. In keep- 
ing with the spirit of this movement, the Catholic 
world has attempted rather successfully to reintroduce 
to the laity the beauties of worship through our 
ancient tradition of Gregorian Chant and other musical 
forms created by masters whom we can claim as our 
own, but who unfortunately have been disassociated 
by the Catholic mind from their places of distinction 
in our musical culture. This concerted effort has taken 
place on every level, in parochial grammar and high 
schools, in parishes, seminaries, and universities. 

Thus it was entirely appropriate that this revival of 
Church music should have its effect on those Univer- 
sity students interested in assisting the movement in 
any way possible. Accordingly, the Resident-Students' 
Choir was formed both for the purpose of singing 
High Masses on Feast Days, Holy Days, and Sundays, 
and also of creating and fostering a lasting interest in 
this work of the Pontiffs. 

The group, though small, has succeeded in bringing 
a beauty and meaning heretofore lacking in the litur- 
gical functions of the resident-students. 





Governments 



Resident Students' 
Council 



Formed to communicate to the College administra- 
tion the desires and suggestions of the more than eight 
hundred students who reside on campus, the Resident- 
Students' Council, as the official ruling body and voice 
of the boarders, attempts to resolve dormitory prob- 
lems, to enact legislation for resident students through 
a reasonably democratic process, and in general to 
make richer the academic and social life of students 
away from home. 

After the fall election of Council members at which 
all dormitories were represented, the year began with 
the formulation of plans for a victory dance after the 



B.C-Marquette football game. Their intent was both 
to provide social diversion for the dorm-students, and 
to realize income for future Council projects. 

In an effort to cope with, and ameliorate the crises 
which arise from a fast-growing resident population, 
the administration-council meetings were frequent and 
decisive on such issues as the cafeteria problem, 
week-end restriction policy, and frequent movie- 
presentations. 

Although in its infancy, the Council promises to 
play an even greater role in the University as the 
expansion program continues to accelerate. 



The official ruling body for resident student affairs, The Dormitory Council talks over the College's 
expanding housing program. Jim Fagan, Dave Barry, Ed Wlodarczyk, Jack Erwin, John Altieri, 
Howard Hecht, Bob Hart. 





A. & S. Student Senate 

The student senate of the College of Arts and 
Sciences is mainly noted for its inauguration last year 
of the annual Maurice J. Tobin International Affairs 
Lecture, named in honor of the late Governor of 
Massachusetts and Secretary of Labor. The first speaker 
of this series was Earl Clement Attlee, former Prime 
Minister of Great Britain, followed in I960 by Lady 
Barbara Ward Jackson, author of "Faith and Freedom" 
and an editor of the London Economist. 

The bulk of the Senators' time is spent in the prac- 
tice of improving student-administration relations. 
Aiding them in this process are the various Section 
Representatives and Alternate Section Representatives. 
In frequently arranged meetings with the deans, prob- 
lems of mutual concern and interest are discussed. 
The A & S student body is, of course, most aware of 
the existence of the Senate at election time when gaily 
colored posters sing the praise of the collegiate 
Claghorns and their separate capacities for vigorous 
defense of the students' rights and privileges. 



Senators from the oldest college withi 
during a bi-monthly meeting. 



the University listen to President Bob O'Leary 



C. B. A. Student Senate 




In an effort to cope with the ever-increasing prob- 
lems which inevitably accompany the rapid physical 
and academic growth of the modern university, the 
role of student government has been expanded rapidly 
to a point where each school of the University has an 
officially elected body of representatives to consider 
and solve the problem of the respective schools. 

The Student Senate of the College of Business 
Administration was established in order to achieve a 
more coordinated system of activity and purpose of 
C. B. A. and to promote greater participation of the 
student body on both a College and University gov- 
ernmental level. 

The purpose of the Student Senate as the highest 
official representatives of the undergraduate student 
body of C. B. A. is to provide a channel by which the 
undergraduates of the College may cooperate with, 
and be of service to, the Administration of the 
University. 

The inception of the Senate form of government 
has been unquestionably successful. In addition to 
alleviating the problems of the cumbersome old style 
government, it has succeeded in clarifying the position 
of the student in the pattern of University life, and is, 
by means of its constructive projects, contributing to 
the continuing growth of the campus. 

C.B.A. Student Senate: (seated) John McDowell, Tom Monahan, 
Bob Kelly, Dick Bentley, Dick Lawless; (rear) Charles Carr, 
Bill Sullivan, Gerry Butterworth, Jim Murray, Tom Hoyon, 
Dick Fitzpatrick, Alex Urbanowicz; (standing, left) Joe Carry, 
President. 



100 




Evening College 
Student Senate 



After initial merger pains, and with the restoration 
of comparatively amicable relations between the 
Intown College and the Evening College governing 
bodies, a concerted effort on the part of both sides 
was begun to function effectively as one unit, the 
Evening College Student Senate. 

Reasonable success accompanied such efforts with 
the result that a Halloween Dance netted sufficient 
income to provide a party for three hundred deserving 
youngsters from Cambridge. The Senate, also success- 
fully campaigned for, and inaugurated, an annual 
Christmas Party at which all could attend for the 
admission price of an appropriate present later to be 
added to food baskets for the needy of the Boston 
Area. 

With the aid of faculty moderators, Father Cum- 
miskey and Mr. Lombard, an active social program 
consisting of a ski-weekend, a spring semi-formal, and 
a graduation outing and dinner-dance was formulated 
and successfully enacted. 



The sixteen officers forming the Student Senate and 
representing the four classes of the School of Educa- 
tion, seemed to have discharged their duties and ful- 
filled their responsibilities adequately over the past 
year under the guidance of Father Donovan, moderator 
of the group. The Senate, like all campus govern- 
mental bodies, attempts nobly to make social plans 
and legislative rulings, and to resolve the profound 
problems of the student body — in this case, of the 
future teachers of America from the lower campus. 

More specifically the Freshmen-Orientation Program 
and the Thanksgiving-Christmas Parties are tangible 
products of the Senate's ponderous, parliamentary pro- 
cedures. Additional accomplishments include the In- 
terclass Skits presented in early March (the senior 
class won, of course) the proceeds of which accrued 
to the Senate and Council for worthy projects such 
as gifts to the College, and a $100 award to an out- 
standing senior male student. 

Striving to keep its members and the student-body 
informed, the Senate sends representatives annually 
to the New England Teachers' Preparation Association 
Program. 



Evening Classes followed by a 9:15 
P.M. meeting cap a heavily scheduled 
day for officers of the Evening Col- 
lege ruling body. 



Christmastime finds the Evening 
College senior class officers placing 
presents under the tree for under- 
privileged children during the an- 
nual Yule-party. 

(Front) Ed Sullivan, President; 
Marilyn Fitzgerald, Secretary; (rear) 
Jim Welsh, Vice President; Bill 
Murphy, Treasurer. 




School of Education Student Senate 

School of Educaton Student Senate: Paul Devlin, Ann Rouse, 
Betty Sheehan, Judy Czarnecki, Beatrice Hanley, Fr. Donovan, 
Brenda Crowley, Maureen Keohane, Jim Russell, Sandra 
Tantorski, Joe Roberts. 




101 



Senior Class Council 

The Senior Class Council is the only official link 
between the various student senates which, in turn, 
are the only official links between the members of the 
senates and the all-powerful Campus Council. At one 
time the officers of the senior class were elected 
directly by all members of the class. But as the election 
machinery became more complicated, with the growth 
and increase in size of the student body, the elections 
were eliminated and each of the four undergraduate 
schools chose their own individual officers. Thus there 
are now sixteen members of the Senior Class Council 
who meet regularly to discuss the problems of the day 
facing the senior class. 

By accident or design, the duties of the Class Coun- 
cil are mainly social. Their meetings consist of selecting 
the time, place and nature of the proms, dinner dances, 
frolics, hops, banquets, concerts, outings, and similar 
events. Although in the race for committee chairman- 
ships, the Class Council has never seen blood flow at 
its meetings, the provocations and circumstances of 
these gatherings have been such that service on it has 
provided invaluable experience for people aiming for 
careers in diplomacy, social work, politics, espionage, 
and matrimony. 



When the School of Education was first erected on the campus 
in 1954, the greatly outnumbered female population of the school 
decided to form organizations devoted solely to, and exclusively 
for, the interests of women students only. One of the first of these 
was the Women's Council, the function of which is to serve as an 
advisory board to the Dean of Women of the School of Education. 
Elected annually from each class, two representatives, one repre- 
senting the elementary majors and the other representing those 
majoring in secondary education, meet every month with the 




Senior Class Council: Joe Carty, Fr. Lawlor, Brenda Crowley, Mike Dorney, Charles 
Daley, Gerry Butterworth, Bob O'Leary, Bill Sullivan, Jim Russell, Maureen Keohane, 
Edith Cackowski, Grace McLaughlin, Bob O'Toole. 



School of Education 

Women's Council 

Dean of Women to discuss the myriad problems facing women 
students in the School of Education. Council members offer sug- 
gestions and policies that attempt solutions of these problems. 
One of the main achievements of the council has been the estab- 
lishment of a Junior-Freshman "sister" program as a part of 
Freshman Orientation Week. Members also serve as officially 
designated hostesses for all official School of Education receptions 
and conferences. 




The Curriculum Library is the scene 
as the Women's Council deliberates 
with Miss Kinnane, Moderator. Anne 
Audet, Anne Flaherty, Alice Mac- 
Donough, Carol Green, Miss Kin- 
nane, Karen Moynihan, Sheila Nu- 
gent, Mary Turbini. 




Nurses and B.C. collegians forsake textbooks and term- 
papers in favor of cha-cha-cha. 

Basic Nurses' 
Student-Faculty 
Organization 

The focal point of all activity for the Basic Nurses 
is the Student-Faculty Organization.. Quite unlike all 
the other student-government bodies with possibly the 
exception of the Graduate Nurses, this organization 
features open meetings three times each year at which 
the entire student body and many faculty members 
are in attendance. 

This governing body is conceivably the most effec- 
tive and best organized group of its type within the 
University due, in great measure, to the comparatively 
small enrollment which lends itself to frequent and 
close contact between students and faculty. 

The Student Council controls extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, regulates student funds; and through the 
Honor Board, enacts disciplinary measures when 
necessary. This same Council has the additional duty 
of planning and running social events, and of pro- 
moting mutually amicable relations between students 
and the administration. The Student-Faculty organiza- 
tion deserves great credit for keeping the nurses highly 
informed and exceedingly successful in all their socio- 
academic endeavors. 




The Sub Turri camera-eye catches nurses before (above) and 
during (left) Student-Faculty meeting with Fr. Gorman 
Rosemary Donovan, Corresponding Secretary; Elena Pelusi, 
Junior Class President; Marcia Fenlon, Treasurer; Fr. Gor- 
man, Moderator; Martha Cadigan, President; Noreen Buckley, 
Vice President; Grace McLaughlin, Senior Class President. 



103 



In keeping with the aims of all student governments 
on campus, the Graduate Nurses' Student-Faculty 
Organization's chief concern and function is the de- 
velopment of the social and cultural interests of the 
students; and the promotion of better understanding 
between faculty and students. Such an organization is 
a vital part of the Graduate Nurses' college career. 

Similar to the Basic Nurses' mode of government, 
this group holds three general meetings each academic 
year which are quite successful despite non-compul- 
sory attendance. These gatherings graphically depict 
the important role of the student in the overall gov- 
ernmental framework, since each has an opportunity 
to voice opinions and suggest motions within, of 
course, the bounds of strict parliamentary procedure. 

Frequent Council meetings with faculty moderator, 
Mrs. Marie Andrews, help formulate and concretize 
plans for proposed dances, teas, socials, and bazaars. 

Unfortunately, because the academic program of 
the Graduate Nurses is of a dispersed nature, an 
organized extra-curricular program is quite difficult. 
However, the Student-Faculty group has been com- 
paratively successful in spanning the gap between 
academic pursuits and the necessary social diversions. 
To this extent the collegiate life of the Graduate 
Nursing School has been significantly enriched. 




The liaison between administration and student is effected by small informal group 
meetings (above) and, of course, the orderly parliamentary gatherings at which faculty 
and students' opinions are more formally aired (below, left). 



Graduate Nurses' Student-Faculty Organization 




Breaking ground for the new Nursing School appropriately named 
Cushing Hall is Richard Cardinal Cushing, benefactor and chief 
ground-breaker of Boston College. 




104 



Football 




1959 





\ 







105 




Navy unveils its big gun and fires a salvo in the form of Joe Bellino, pictured above eluding our Eagles' Don Tosi on a touchdown run. 




1959 FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD 



s.c. 




Opponents 


8 


Navy 


24 


8 


Army 


44 


39 


Villanova 


6 


35 


Dartmouth 


12 


16 


Marquette 





21 


Detroit 


9 


14 


Pittsburgh 


22 


7 


Boston University 


26 


14 


Holy Cross 






106 



Boston College 8 — 

Navy 24 

B.C. opened its 1959-1960 football season against 
the Midshipmen of Navy in the second meeting of 
these two clubs in thtee yeats. The first period was 
touch and go with both elevens displaying flashes of 
powet, but insufficient fot a sustained scoting drive. 

Howevet, the second period saw the Navy unleash 
its guns in the form of a 65 yard run by Dick Pariseau, 
and, five minutes later, a Bellino punt-return good for 
seventy yards and a commanding 12-0 lead. 

In the thitd period Navy gained a still more decisive 
lead over the waveting Eagles by adding twelve mote 
points to their total. Again Pariseau displayed the stuff 
of which Middie backfield men are made — this time 
in the form of a line buck from the four yard stripe for 
a six-pointer through the prostrate Eagle left side. The 
other six of the twelve points was supplied by the 
powerful legs of Joe Bellino who flashed around end 
for a sixteen-yaid romp to paydirt. 

In the final quatter, the Eagles finally took to the 
air via a 33 yard VanCott-to-Dyer scoting pass play. 
The same combination teamed up again on a similar 
pass play for the extra two points. 

It was obvious to the many fans who watched the 
seemingly one-sided contest, that B.C. had lost through 
fumbles and poor pass-reception, lack of coordinated 
pass patterns and downfield blocking. 




Johnny Amabile adds a few cubits to his stature to foil a Navy pass early 
in the first period. 



Middies Sink Eagle Hopefuls in Season-Opener 



The Middie secondary, Pariseau (47) and Maxfield (11) blanket Bill Robinson as he claws in vain for an Amabile pass. 




Boston College 8 — 
Army 44 

Resuming a tough schedule, the Eagles headed up 
the Hudson to meet a foimidable foe, the Black 
Knights of Army. Rated, in preseason polls, as number 
one in the East, Army was favored by over 30 points 
to take their opening game. With such stars as 
Anderson, Caldwell, and Carpenter working legerde- 
main with the pigskin, B.C. feared the worst for its 
heroes. 

Army wasted no time in flexing its muscles. Hardly 
had the gun sounded, when Caldwell threw two suc- 
cessive passes in the eager hands of Bob Anderson for 
a 14-0 lead. B.C. was not to be denied, however. Shifty 
Jim Sullivan took the spinning pigskin for a 65 yard 
punt return. On the next play from scrimmage John 
Amabile faded back and heaved a spiral pass to the 
same Jim Sullivan standing alone in the end zone. 

The Eagles breathed deeply of the upset atmosphere 
about the B.C. stands and leveled another drive at the 
Cadet goal line. However, the 70 yard grind was 
abruptly halted by an untimely fumble on the seven 
yard stripe. 

The Heights-men never recovered, and before the 
first half ended, Army rolled up another seven points. 

In the last thirty minutes, the lack of Eagle depth 
was obvious and cost dearly to the tune of 23 more 
points as Army began to ramble about the field almost 
at will. 




Right halfback Jim Sullivan, after a ten yard advance, prepares to hit the tutf under 
the persuasion of Army guard, Harry Miller. 



A host of Knights from Army's left side converge upon Jim Sullivan as he attempts 
to head upfield. 



i 






Black Knights Dominate 
Joust At The Point 



- : 5*. 




108 




Wildcat Leon Horin pounce 
aerial on the Villanova nine. 



too late as Billy Rob 



Wildcats Tamed 

Boston College 39 — 
Villanova 6 

B.C. posted the first victory of the season against 
Villanova before an enthusiastic Homecoming Day 
capacity crowd. There was never a moment's doubt 
about the outcome of this one. It was the Eagles' turn 
to romp at will. The half-time scoreboard read 30-0. 
Amabile culminated a sustained aerial-attack drive 
with a dive from the one-yard marker. Kirouac then 
displayed his specialty by splitting the uprights. Sopho- 
more quarterback George VanCott then executed a 
masterful fake and walked around the left side into 
the end zone for six more. Kirouac again split the 
uprights just as the first period ended. 

At the beginning of the second quarter, Kirouac 
alertly scooped up a loose ball and bulled his way into 
the end zone for a 20-0 lead. Ross O'Hanley flipped a 
pass to Hogan for two more to make it 22-0. VanCott 
rifled a bullet pass to Ron Dyer for yet another six 
pointer, and cockily repeated his performance for the 
extra two. When the gun sounded for the end of the 
half, the Wildcats limped off the gridiron for a wel- 
come breather. 

Midway in the third period Vin Hogan scooted 
through the tackle slot for nine yards and the final 
B.C. score. With all the regulars catching a well- 
deserved rest, Villanova broke out with a score on a 
pass from Roehe to Bohan who scurried for 20 yards 
down the sideline. The rest of the afternoon saw the 
Eagle reserves thwart drive after drive to the complete 
frustration of the Wildcat eleven. 



Again Robby displays his pass-catching talent six steps from paydirt. 




Frank Robotti, churning around the enemy linemen, hurriedly glances down held 
in search of an opening in Villanova's defense pattern. 



109 



.■>■■■ 




Tom Casey inches over final stripe with a late-arriving Crouthamel as additional baggage. 



Hoop-form is in vogue for the few seconds that Larry Eisenhower tries to 
outleap two Indian defenders. 



Eagles Vanquish Green 



Boston College 35 — 
Dartmouth 12 

Fresh from an effortless win over Villanova, the 
Eagles started in anew; this time the Gteen-men of 
Dartmouth were the victims. 

Early in the first quartet, Tom Casey slanted through 
tackle for the opening six points. Lou Kitouac pro- 
vided the extra point which proved valuable at the 
time, as Dartmouth scored ten minutes later on a 
Bill Gundy-to-Jake Crouthamel pass play. The two- 
point try was smotheted by the charging Eagle line- 
men. 

Leading 7-6 going into the second quarter, B.C. 
began a machine-like drive. Frank Robotti ended the 
power-grind with a one yard rush for a score. Johnny 
Amabile displayed his specialty and found Hogan 
standing alone in enemy paydirt. Needless to say, 
Lou Kitouac booted both P.A.T.'s for a 21-6 lead. 

In the final stanza, Vin Hogan thrilled the fans with 
a peifectly timed shoestring catch in the Green end 
zone, for his second tally of the day. Frank Robotti's 
second one yard plunge upped the total to 35, after 
which the game metcifully ended. 



Frank Robotti makes like a battering ram, breaching Dartmouth's forward 
wall for still another score. 



ttife 






Boston College's first field goal in many moons arcs to its zenith from the toe of Harry Ball before plunging between the uprights. 

Forward Wall Hands Warriors Blank 














Marquette's Silas Woods with a spectacular pass snag, brings forth 
Robinson and B.C. rooters. 



te 



>m Billy 



Boston College 16 — 
Marquette 

Marquette arrived at the Heights sporting the 
second best passing offense in the country. By game 
time, anxious looks and conversations flashed about 
the B.C. stands, and the visitors had the Eagle fans 
more worried than our stalwarts on the field. How- 
ever . . . 

Joe Sikorski, a sophomore end, gave a preview of 
things to come by blocking a Warrior punt on their 
25 yard line. The Eagles, quickly taking advantage of 
the situation, moved 25 yards on their way to winning 
number three. George VanCott culminated the effort 
with a scamper for six yards around the vulnerable 
Marquette right end. 

Toward the close of the first half, Harry Ball lifted 
the ball between the uprights for B.C.'c first field goal 
in ten years and a 9-0 lead. 

The final six came midway through the third period. 
Dick Gill sped downfield, outran his defender, snagged 
an Amabile pass, and slid into the end zone. The 
dependable Kirouac added the extra point and B.C. 
marched off the field with a 16-0 victory. 

Glynn, Casey and O'Hanley played what was per- 
haps their best defensive game of the year by account- 
ing for 50% of the tackles. 

The game marked several "firsts" for the Eagles — 
the first Sunday contest in six years, the first field goal 
within memory, and the first shutout of the season, ill 



Boston College 21 — 
Detroit 9 

The Eagles headed west to the land of the automo- 
bile and wintry Lake Michigan blasts, for what prom- 
ised to be a close contest with the Detroit Titans. The 
Heights-men sensing the importance of an impressive 
win, rose to the occasion by posting their fourth 
straight victory. 

The Titans drew first blood with an opening quarter 
field goal. However, Amabile lofted three quick passes 
netting three scores, the first on a cross-flip to Bill 
Robinson who churned the remaining ten yards to 
paydirt; the succeeding two for thirty-one and thirty 
yards respectively to sophomore Lou Kirouac who 
rurned in his finest performance of the year, not only 
in terms of pass-receptions, but also of three successful 
conversion attempts. 

The determined Titans found themselves outclassed 
before the devastating thirteen-of-nineteen aetial com- 
pletions by Johnny Amabile, the forty-three yard aver- 
age on punt returns of Bill Robinson, and the cus- 
tomary stellar line play of Tosi, Glynn, O'Brien, 
LaRosa and Casey. 




A slippery ball receives both an affectionate and desperate 
hug from Tom Casey during a rather moist contest with Pitt 
at Alumni Stadium. 



Titan(ic) Defeat; 





Vin Hogan romps merrily through the surf during his 
ninety-yard kick-off march through the sea. 



112 



Boston College 14 — 
Pittsburgh 22 




Panthers Squeak By 



The story of the entire afternoon is capsulized above - 
punt-artist, duels Pitt with another return quick-kick. 



■Bill Robinson, 



Bad luck in the form of a steady torrent of rain and 
a miry field combined to foil the Eagles in their 
attempt for victory number five. 

After a stalemated first period, Johnny Amabile 
again displayed his passing talent with a completed 
aerial-bullet pass to Bill Robinson on the goal line. 
"The Toe" Kirouac spun the ball past the uprights for 
a 7-0 shortlived lead. Shortly after, Pitt's Fred Cox 
booted a long field goal to narrow the margin to 4 
points. 

In the third quarter, the same Fred Cox, showing 
his dazzling speed, sped through the B.C. bewildered 
defense for a 63 yard caper and a 9-7 lead. 

The Eagles came back under the speed and power 
of Vin Hogan. Vin took the Pitt kickoff on his own 
ten and galloped down the sidelines for 90 yards and 



l.C. stalwarts persevere to the end only to see Panthers triumph by eight points. 





the most spectacular running play of the 1959 season. 
B.C. now had the lead, 14-9. 

During the disastrous fourth period, the somber 
air about the B.C. stands thickened as Ivan "The 
Terrible" Toncic proceeded to enhance his name by 
combining his "take charge" ability with the running 
power of Cox and Cunningham to produce two touch- 
down drives for 13 points and the game. 



A light workout after a week of grueling 
practice almost, but not quite, brought 
victory on the miserable Pitt weekend. 



113 













Diminutive and elusive Paul Cancro gets halted 



With the workman-like abandon that typified his play for the entire season, 
Ross O'Hanley assumes a chopping position to cut a B.U. tackier down to size. 



Comm. Ave Enemy Hounds Eagles to Death 



Unquestionably, the Terriers had a head for football one disastrous fall Saturday. 

PI I 

m 

1 




114 



Boston College 7 — 
Boston University 26 

It was a highly confident team that entered B.U.'s 
field fot the annual rivalry with our Commonwealth 
Avenue neighbors. Tom Casey started the scoring with 
a slant from the five yatd line, after a fumble by the 
Terriers. This was the opening 20 seconds of play and 
perhaps the only 20 seconds that the B.C. team and 
fans enjoyed in the game. Ftom then on, a determined, 
spirited Tetrier squad dominated the afternoon. 

Two mighty-mites, Paul Cancro and Emo DiNitto 
spelled doom for B.C. Cancro, the outstanding player 
of the day, scooted, bobbed, weaved, tripped, and 
darted over the prostrate Eagles for two B.U. scores, 
the first on a one yard dash around the Eagles' left 
end, the second on a 22 yard pass play engineered by 
quarterback DiNitto. Emo also found captain Gene 
Prebola in the end zone for a second score. 

Sophomore George Bradley, a B.U. standout, prom- 
ised trouble for future B.C. teams. On many occasions, 
after masterly deception of the B.C. defense, he scam- 
pered around end for consistently long gains. 

B.U. fans had cause to be jubilant in view of their 
first victory in twenty-two years. Had not the superb 
defensive play of Ross O'Hanley, Terry Glynn, and 
Bill Byrne contained the fiery Terriers, the defeat 
might well have turned into a greater rout. Next . . . 
Holy Cross. 




Behind key-blocking, Vin Hogan tallies his first of two scores in the mire of Fitton Field. 



Again Eagles Humble Fitton Rivals 

To the chagrin of Cross halfback Allen, the Eagles' impregnable forward wall demon- 
strates how well the '57 lesson was learned. 




Boston College 14 — 
Holy Cross 

( Rain . . . mire . . . Fitton Field. ) 
The first half of the Cross game was a study in 
defensive play as the battle of quick-kicks raged back 
and forth in the mud. The Purple drive advanced, 
sputtered, and was hurled back by the determined 
Eagles' defense who, with the fiasco of '57 rooted in 
their minds, had apparently learned their lesson well. 
This time it was the Anderson troupe's turn to go to 
school. And, in the second half, Hogan and company 
were superlative teachers. 

After slogging for fifty-yards toward the barely 
discernible Crusaders' goal, Hogan topped the drive 
with a five yard slip to paydirt. Kirouac promptly 
converted for a 7-0 lead. 



115 



The panicking Worcester- ites took to the air during 
the final quarter only to set up the second Eagle score 
when Jim Connolly intercepted a wayward aerial, 
eluded the futile dives of three Crusaders, and drove 
to the mid-field stripe. The Heights-men, now veteran 
swimmers, moved the remaining fifty on four quick 
plays for the clincher. Amabile, faced with a third- 
and-four situation on the Purple thirty-three, fired to 
the waiting Hogan, who again waded to the goal for 
the final T.D. of the day. Kirouac supplied point four- 
teen, and an impressive victory. 




.;' ;:-«»p*£ 



Hogan audaciously points out to the enemy his direction of advance. It availed the 
Crusader naught ... to wit, Vin's second T.D. of the game. 



Fumbles . . . Punting Duel . . . Hogan . . .Victory 



Robby's graceful (and solitary) two-step in the Purple end zone is on the 
verge of being nullified by a diligent official for a penalty downfield. 



TV; 







Superb defensive halfback and linebacker, Eagle defender par excellence, 
Ross O'Hanley, grimaces but somehow manages to outreach a half-hearted 
Crusader attempt to complete a last minute aerial. 




116 



'*Jf 



/ 



The 1959 Eagles Football Squad. 



Difficult Schedule . . .Winning Season . . .Well Done! 



Coach Mike Holavak and Tony Abraham closely scrutinize the Eagles' 
progress. 



And so the season ended. Many say that a Glynn, 
an O'Hanley, an Amabile, or Hogan should be singled 
out for jobs well done, but we shall not. Instead we 
commend to you the whole team for its 8:00 P.M. 
practices, late suppers, and countless sprains in the 
highest tradition of this college and its motto. They 
have served us and our name well. 




> **? 




Drive . . . Eagles' leading scorer 
downs against the Crusaders . . 
Vin Hogan. 



. . . spirit . . . two touch- 
O'Melia Trophy Winner, 




Twenty-one pass receptions out of twenty- 
three attempts . . . All New England end 
. . . Don Tosi. 




Senior Eagles: (standing) Bob Kerresey, Vin Hogan, Jim Murphy, Ross 
O'Hanley, Tom Casey, Don Tosi, Jim O'Brien, Jeff Linehan. (Kneeling) 



Frank Keaney, Harry Ball, Tony Abraham, Frank Casey (Captain), Tom 
Keaney, Jeff Sullivan, Frank Moretti, Tony LaRosa. 






'*.•■' / iiniT 



85 7'4 T j}4 




HOCKEY 






1959- 


960 SEASON 




Harvard 


2-4 


B.C. 


6-1 


R.P.I. 


Brown 


1-5 


B.C. 


4-3 


Colby 


R.P.I. 


5-4 


B.C. 


1-5 


Providence 


Princeton 


2-8 


B.C. 


2-5 


Boston U. 


St. Lawrence 


5-5 


B.C. 


12-1 


Brown 


Laval 


4-5 


B.C. 


7-2 


Clarkson 


North Dakota 


5-3 


B.C. 


5-6 


St. Lawrence 


Toronto 


5-4 


B.C. 


5-5 


Northeastern 


Northeastern 


2-6 


B.C. 


6-3 


Army 


Dartmouth 


3-4 


B.C. 


5-0 


Boston U. 


Clarkson 


3-6 


B.C. 


5-4 


Providence 


Yale 


0-7 


B.C. 


4-2 


Boston U. 



:>X's: 




ii^i*^-*^*^*' 



119 




Captain Chris Smith helps equipment manager Ralph DellaRusso tape his ankle before leading the Eagles onto the ice for an afternoon 
practice session. 

Rod O'Connor fights to control the puck along the boards against Harvard as Smith comes in to lend a hand. 





Billy Daley awaits a drive and a possible rebound 
near the Dartmouth cage. 



The Eagles were hard hit by injuries and academic fatalities 
during the '59-'60 season but still managed to land an N.C.A.A. 
Tournament berth. A late-season victory over B.U. and close 
verdicts over Providence and R.P.I, carried the Kelley entourage 
into the envied N.C.A.A. contest. For the record, it was Snook's 
twenty-sixth winning season in twenty-seven years at B.C. 

Junior defenseman, Red Martin, led the scoring parade for the 
second year with forty-three points, along with Bobby Leonard, 
and Bill Daley, who were members of the Twenty-Goal Club. 

In the season-opener, B.C. continued its dominance over Harvard 
with a 4-2 victory. Leonard, Cusack, and Daley had the Eagles in 
a 3-2 lead late in the contest, but it was Chris Smith's thirty foot 
slap-shot that settled matters. 

Game number two took place in the north country called 
R.P.I. -land. The Engineers found a nervous B.C. sextet on the ice, 
and had three goals within five minutes. From there on in, it was 
an up-hill struggle for the Eagles with Leonard and Cusack scoring 
in the final period to tie the contest at 5-5. However, R.P.I, got 
the clincher with two minutes remaining. 

B.C.'s annual trip to Brown proved easier than usual as the 5-1 
score indicates. Two fast goals by Martin and Daley gave the 
Eagles an early and secure lead. Additional scores, one in the 
second period, and two more in the final frame, brought the total 
to five, and to eventual victory. 

A five goal third period, a severe injury to Jim Logue, and 
sophomore Charlie Driscoll's goal-tending were the topics of con- 
versation after the second home game against Princeton. 

Logue sustained a cut artery in his face in the opening period 
and was promptly replaced by Driscoll, who stepped in and 
mastered the Tigers with only one goal for the remainder of the 
game. Daley, Walsh, and Leonard had two goals each in the game; 
Daley and Walsh in the last period, to break open the game and 
give the Eagles an 8-2 win. 

The following night against St. Lawrence, it was B.C. who 
suffered the five goal third period. With Bob Famiglietti and 
Dave Pergola scoring their first goals of the year, B.C. built up a 
5-0 lead with ten minutes left in the game. The Larries then 
roared back to blanket Charlie Driscoll with fifteen shots; five of 
which put on the red light. A five minute overtime failed to 
break the deadlock. 

Three Canadian teams were next on the agenda for B.C. Laval 
of Montreal was the first of the trio and the Eagles came through 
with a 6-5 upset. Early goals by Jason and O'Connor had B.C. 
in front 2-1, but the Frenchmen came back to command a 5-4 lead 
within four minutes of the final buzzer. But Dave Pergola fixed 





Dave Pergola streaks over R.P.I, 
drop-pass. 



blue-line while Famiglietti waits for his 



121 




Chris Smith rifles a shot, but the Dartmouth goalie is equal 
to the challenge. 



Charlie Driscoll smothers a B.U. scoring effort as Charlie McCarthy and Tom Martin 
reinforce their plucky goaltender. 




122 



the tying goal on a power play, to be followed by Bill Daley who 
drove home a twenty-footer to win it at 19:08. Jim Logue 
obviously had regained his form in this, his first game after the 
Princeton injuty. 

Toronto University bolstered by a wall-like defense upended 
B.C. 5-4 before a crowd of close to 4,500. Jack Cusack's early 
goal gave B.C. their only lead in the game. Toronto came back to 
build up a 3-1 lead. Walsh and Martin tied it, only to have 
Toronto get two quick scores within forty seconds during the 
final period and capture the win. A late goal by Daley reduced the 
margin of defeat for the B.C. pucksters. 

The fastest team the Forum observers have seen this year came 
in the uniforms of North Dakota University. The visiting Sioux 
had a 3-0 lead at the end of the first period and appeared headed 
for an easy win. After N.D. had been hit by a rash of roughing 
penalties in the first few moments of the second period, the Eagles 
clicked for two goals after which the Sioux buckled down in the 
last period for a 5-3 win. 

The Clarkson University sextet was next on the scene. For the 
first time in five years B.C. won. With the score tied 3-3, and 
with six minutes left to play Rod O'Connor, Owen Hughes, and 
Bob Leonard found the mark for a 6-3 win. 

The big Green from Dartmouth came close to upsetting B.C.; 
but a Cusack last minute backhander forestalled the disaster even 
though Dartmouth tallied three times to tie the game. Walsh, 
Jason, and Famiglietti were the opening goal scorers for B.C. 

Bill Daley's hat-trick was the highlight of the evening as B.C. 
trounced Northeastern 6-2. The dynamic center scored on two 
early breakaways to put the game literally on ice. 

Pergola and Famiglietti harass Dartmouth's goalie who has just gloved a 
screaming drive. 





Dartmouth goalie goes down to smother a shot by Red Martin as Cusack and 
Leonard jockey for position in case the puck should bounce free. 




Jim Logue leaves his net to squelch a Northeastern rush in the Beanpot Tournament. 



123 



If 







Owen Hughes fights for position while Ron Walsh waits for a centering 
pass in the victorious R.P.I, game at McHugh Forum. 



The U.S. Olympians were lucky to salvage a tie during a one 
period affair at the Garden. Rod O'Connor opened the scoring, 
only to have Olympic star Tom Williams tie the game. Late in 
the period Owen Hughes nipped the corner of the cage for a 
2-1 lead. A last minute peppering of the B.C. net paid off for the 
U.S. as Bob McVey settled the outcome at 2-2. 

Yale provided Jim Logue with his first varsity shutout as the 
Eagles romped 7-0 at New Haven. Smith, Leonard, Famiglietti, 
Jason, Riley, Martin, and Pergola were the big seven who built up 
a solid cushion for Jimmy in the first two periods. 

In the key game of the year at McHugh Forum, B.C. got 
revenge and a high N.C.A.A. ranking with a solid 6-1 victory 
over R.P.I. An early Jack Cusack goal gave B.C. a lead they never 
relinquished. Smith, Daley, Hughes, Martin, and O'Connor also 
registered. Jimmie Logue came up with another excellent per- 
formance in the nets. 

After exams B.C. entertained Colby and were fortunate to wind 
up on the long end of a 4-3 score. Breakaway goals by McCarthy, 
Famiglietti, and Daley broke a 1-1 tie to give B.C. a 4-1 lead 
going into the final period. However, Roy Johnson scored two 
goals for the Mules. Logue's goaltending preserved the win. 

The rapidly improving Providence Friars, fresh from a 7-0 win 
over Harvard unleashed Joe Keough and Co. against the Eagles 
for a 5-1 win at Providence. Owen Hughes managed the lone 
B.C. goal in the surprise game of the year. 



Jack Cusack is foiled by the B.U. goalie on a breakaway bid, all to the 
disappointment of standing B.C. fans. 





Owen Hughes nudges puck through the Princeton goalie's pads for a score. The Eagle pucksters suit up for their daily afternoon practice session. 




A puck from the stick of Bob Leonard just misses the corner of the Princeton cage. 



125 




The senior members of the '59-'60 team pose with Coach Kelley for their last shot. Clark Duncan, Dick Riley, Jack Cusack, Chris Smith, 
Coach Kelley, Bob Leonard, Dave Pergola, Ron Walsh, Bob Rudman. 




In the semi-finals of the Beanpot Tourney, defending cham- 
pion B.C. received their second shock, a 5-2 defeat at the hands 
of the B.U. Terriers. Two goals by Bob Marquis came at key 
spots, one breaking a 1-1 tie and the other increasing a 4-2 lead. 
Cusack and Daley scored for B.C., but all in vain for the Eagles. 

Brown University appeared at McHugh Forum sporting a six 
game winning streak. B.C. quickly burst the balloon with a solid 
12-1 win. Jack Cusack and Ron Walsh scored four apiece for 
B.C. while Dick Hickey and Bob Ponds scored their first goals of 
the year. B.C. managed six goals in the first period. 

In the first leg of the annual New York trip, the Eagles 
humbled Clarkson 7-4 as Bob Leonard scored two goals and Chtis 
Duncan one goal. 

The Larries, after sporting the Eagles a sizeable lead, and after 
trailing 4-0, scored four times in the second period to tie the 
game. Langill then put the New Yorkers in the lead with ten 
minutes left. Bill Daley was awarded a penalty shot, but missed; 
and B.C.'s last chance for victory vanished. 



Owen Hughes and Ron Walsh 
mAUH glove of Dartmouth's goalie. 



atch puck whiz over the outstretched 




After a 5-3 loss to Northeastern, the Eagles, avenging losses 
in football and basketball, dropped Army 6-3 at McHugh Forum. 
Walsh, Smith, Daley, and Leonard scored the key goals as B.C. 
broke the Academy's eight-game winning streak. Driscoll starred 
during the last period as Army pressed in vain for the win. 

Charlie Driscoll again came to the fore, this time with a shutout 
performance as the Eagles upset B.U. 5-0. In a key first period 
Driscoll made 11 saves, 10 of the sensational variety, to completely 
demoralize the Terriers. The first of a brace of goals by Ron Walsh 
increased the total to four after two periods, with Leonard adding 
the fifth goal in the last period. 

In the greatest finish McHugh forum has ever seen, Boston 
College nipped the Providence Friars 5-4 to secure an N.C.A.A. 
Tourney berth. With the Eagles trailing 4-3 and only twenty 
seconds left in the clash, Ron Walsh deflected a Red Martin 
shot by the Providence goalie to tie it at 4-4. Bedlam broke loose 
— i died down — and then erupted again as Owen Hughes got the 
winning goal on a twenty foot backhander with seconds left 
before the final buzzer sounded. 



* 



Charley Driscoll splits, but Bob Marquis' shot has scooted into the cage 
for a Terrier score. 




Driscoll readies stick, glove, and pads to stop a Terrier breakaway. 



127 




Bob Famiglietti pokes the rubber disc by a disgruntled, and sprawling 
Harvard goalie. 




1959-1960 Boston College Hockey Squad. 




128 



1959- 


1960 BASKETBALL SEASON 


Brown 


69-75 


B.C. 


56-71 


Providence 


Army 


83-81 


B.C. 


74-51 


U. Mass. 


Northeastern 


63-65 


B.C. 


93-77 


Georgetown 


Connecticut 


84-67 


B.C. 


75-59 


Colby 


Rhode Island 


85-82 


B.C. 


68-80 


Holy Cross 


Pittsburgh 


76-66 


B.C. 


86-82 


Harvard 


U. Detroit 


94-81 


B.C. 


71-88 


Seton Hall 


Wisconsin 


95-82 


B.C. 


56-59 


Providence 


Pittsburgh 


66-75 


B.C. 


78-82 


Boston U. 


Villanova 


81-67 


B.C. 


87-70 


Brandeis U. 


Boston U. 


81-64 


B.C. 


98-76 


Tufts U. 


Fairfield 


67-78 


B.C. 


78-86 


Holy Cross 






B.C. 


77-70 


Syracuse 



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Jim Hooley shows his outstanding form by outleaping a defender for the rebound. 



BASKETBALL 



129 




Inexperience and lack of height produced the second losing 
season in the eight year B.C. career of Dino Martin. A few more 
inches and a little more coolness under fire could have easily 
reversed the 1 1 won 14 lost record. 

The highlight of the season, Jim Hooley, a sophomore from 
B.C. High, broke the one year scoring record of Dick Skeffington 
(452 points — 1954-'55) and was named on the second All-New 
England team. 

Another exciting sophomore was Billy Donovan from Rockville 
Center, N. Y. He averaged 16.5 points a game, only two less than 
Hooley, with his deadly two-hand semi-jump, semi-set shot. 

In playing the toughest schedule since the war, the Eagles did 
manage upset wins over Pittsburgh, Georgetown, and Syracuse 
and just missed against Army, B.U., Holy Cross and Providence. 

Hooley and Donovan got the Eagles off to a winning start as 
the Eagles whipped Brown 75-69 at Providence. A late surge by 
Army overcame a B.C. lead and the Cadets came out on top 83-81. 

Northeastern's surprise quintet came within a shade of an upset 
but a Donovan set-shot gave B.C. a 65-63 win. The fourth straight 
road-game was played at Connecticut. With the Eagles trailing 
71-63, the Heightsmen tried a full court press which backfired 
as the U. Conns outscored them 10-4 in the final three minutes 
for an 81-67 victory. 

Trailing by ten points with four minutes remaining in the 
game, B.C. came back to take an 82-81 lead over Rhode Island. 
B.C. had the ball, but lost it within these last few seconds for 
four R.I. points and the second straight loss 85-82. 



Bill Foley goes up for a jump shot as Jim Hooley readies for a possible rebound. 



Gerry McKenna drives through 
the middle for an important two- 
pointer against Georgetown. 




130 




Brian Fitzpatrick far out-maneuvers a Friar defender for one of his timely scores. 



Coach of the Eagles' quintet, Dino Martin. 

In the first of two against Pitt, Capt. Jack Schoppmeyer hit for 
twenty-three points; but the Eagles never gained the lead as the 
Panthers triumphed 76-66. A Sunday game at Detroit produced 
the fourth loss despite the efforts of Hooley who had 26 points. 
The twelfth-ranking Titans exploded in the third period and went 
on to a 94-81 win. 

The Wisconsin Badgers continued to make it an unpleasant 
Christmas trip for the Eagles and wound up on the long end of a 
95-82 score. Bill Donovan had 30 points in the losing cause and 
scored on eleven field goals in the final half. 

In a return engagement with Pittsburgh, B.C. managed their 
third win of the year via a 75-66 score. Frank Quinn and Bill 
Foley played a superb defensive game as the Panthers smarted 
under the upset. 

Before a partisan Villanova crowd at Roberts Cenrer, the 
visiting Wildcats remained undefeated with a solid 81-67 victory. 
The Wildcats shattered a 10-10 tie with twelve points and were 
never overtaken after this scoring spurt. 




131 





Hooley and Cochran offer each other 
mutual assistance in hitting for two 
more against our arch-rivals, the Purple 
from Worcester land. 



Roy "Moose" Falvey watches the ball 
about to swish through the hoop after a 
fast break. 



132 



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Hooley watches the Ctusader's shot ate toward the basket while Brian Fitzpatrick 
anticipates leaping for the rebound. 



Boston University gave the Eagles a solid trouncing and never 
lost their lead after two minutes of the first period. Hooley had 
22 points but B.U.'s height and accuracy spelled doom for the 
home quintet. 

Minor fisticuffs and a victory came as the result of the Fairfield 
game. Larry Eisenhauer, Bill Donovan, and Joe Siborski shone in 
both halves as B.C. prevailed 78-67. 

A visit to Providence wound up in a 71-56 loss to the nation's 
tenth-ranking team. B.C. led at the half 35-33 but PC sharp- 
shooters hit for twenty-five points at the start of the second half 
to wrap up the contest. 

The U. Mass. squad received the shock of the season when 
B.C.'s sophomores found the range and handed the Redmen a 
74-51 defeat. Donovan with twenty-four points and Hooley with 
twenty-two led the way as the Eagles dominated by as much as 
thirty points in the final half. 




Jack Schoppmeyer, captain of the 1959-1960 
Boston College Basketball Squad. 






s 




Georgetown's Brian Sheehan who was averaging twenty-four 
points, ran into B.C.'s Bill Foley and was shutout as the Eagles 
won the game 93-77. Jim Hooley tallied thirty points and Foley 
eighteen to decide the issue in favor of the Martinmen. 

The Eagles captured their third straight win at the expense of 
Colby 75-59. The Mules were a challenge for three periods, until 
Schoppmeyer and Donovan gave the Eagles a decisive twenty-one 
point lead that was sufficient for victory. 

In the first game against Holy Cross, Bill Foley hit for thirty- 
three points but to no avail. The Purple rebounding was too 
accurate for the height-less Eagles. 

A late comeback by Harvard failed with the result that the 
86-82 B.C. win was preserved, due to excellent rebounding and 
shooting by Bill Foley. 

Superior second-half rebounding and foul-line shooting by 
Seton Hall cut deeply into a B.C. half-time lead and produced an 
88-71 victory for the New Jersey club. Jim Hooley netted twenty- 
five points in the losing cause. 

The exciting game of the year was against the Providence 
Friars. The contest resulted in a 59-56 loss but the R.I. quintet 
nearly lost its national ranking. After trailing by eight points the 
Eagles went ahead to a 56-55 lead with two minutes remaining. 



Six foot, eleven-inch Jim Hadnot then exploded for four points 
to nip the win for the Friars. 

B.U.'s Ed Powers scored twenty-six points and had fourteen 
rebounds to salvage an 82-78 win for the Terriers in a return 
engagement with the Eagles. Donovan, Schoppmeyer and Hooley 
all hit for sixteen points. 

The Judges of Brandeis were decisively outclassed as B.C. ran 
up an 87-70 win at Waltham. Hooley led the parade of marksmen 
with eighteen points and twelve rebounds. 

Win number ten came very easily at the expense of Tufts 98-76. 
Jack McAuliffe and Roy Falvey supplemented the sharpshooting 
of Donovan, Hooley and Foley. The Eagles were never less than 
twenty-five points in front during the second half. 

The return visit by Holy Cross almost produced an upset. 
Ralph Brandt came through with five points in the final two 
minutes to break up a close 77-73 game and produce an 86-78 
Purple victory. Hooley again led all scorers, but the N.I.T.-bound 
Crusaders had too much height once again. 

Syracuse closed the B.C. season on a happy note as the Eagles 
came up with a 77-70 upset. Hooley broke Sherrington's scoring 
record of 452 points with twenty-six tallies. The Eagles trailed 
only once in the season's windup. 





The Boston College cross-country track team enhanced the 
University's track reputation with a solid 8-2 record with vic- 
tories over Northeastern, Bowdoin, Maine, Tufts and Boston 
University. Injuries hampered our harriers in the New England 
meet; however, cross-country captain Bob O'Leary, was the stand- 
out, winning seventh place out of a highly competitive field of 
150 runners. 

The indoor season met with even greater success. An impressive 
10-1 record was highlighted by a sweeping victory in the Greater 
Boston Championship meet against Tufts, Northeastern, and 
Boston University. Wins in the one and two mile events by 
O'Leary, in the thousand by Duff, in the six hundred by Quinn, 
and in the dash by Falla brought the bacon home to the Heights. 
The championship was clinched by a last minute victorious relay 
performance by Quinn, O'Leary, Collucci and Duff. 



136 



Coach Bill Gilligan completed his ninth and most successful 
season this year due to consistently high-caliber performances by 
an undefeated freshman cross-country squad, by Sam Vincent and 
Walt Shields in the high jump, broad jump, and hurdles; by 
Steve Coyne in high jump and weight events, by two record- 
setters — O'Leary and Quinn in the mile and six hundred re- 
spectively, and by hurdler Jim Keaney and sprinter Bill Falla. 

With an exceptionally talented freshman squad to fill the ranks 
of a depleted varsity, the B.C. track outlook for the years ahead 
looks exceedingly optimistic. 



TRACK 




Captain Ed Quinn displays the form that has won many races an 
prizes for the track squad. 



Boston College Track Team Coach, Bill Gilligan. 






Coach Gilligan and team captain Ed Quinn hold the symbol of track 
supremacy, the Greater Boston Indoor Championship Trophy. 



The Boston College Indoor Track Team: (kneeling) Sam Vincent, 
Jim Keaney, Tom Hagan, Jim Duff; (standing) Bob O'Leary, Bill 
Falla, Ed Quinn, Coach Gilligan, Dick O'Shaugnessy, Walter Shields. 




Veteran trackman, Bill Falla, perfects his starting form in preparation 
for a successful season. 



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138 










Baseball 



A poor year was forecast for the 1959 Boston College baseball 
team; however, season's end found the record at 12 wins, 7 losses, 
and one tie. A 3-6-1 won -loss record appeared at mid-season, 
when the smoke cleared. The Eagles then roared through nine of 
their last ten, missing an N.C.A.A. Tourney bid by a bat-splinter. 

A poor defense ruined the Eagles chances for victory in the 
opener. Gerry Hamel drove in the lone run in the Tufts 8-1 romp. 
George Giersch allowed only four hits; but six walks and five 
infield bobbles eventually led to his downfall. 

The surprise performer of the season, Bob Niemiec, turned in 
the first of his many stellar efforts for the year even though the 
cause was lost in a tight 2-1 duel with the Springfield Indians in 
the latter's home acres. Bob Usseglio, after a Hamel walk, doubled 
to the flag pole in the fourth inning. But two singles, a walk, and 
two errors gave Springfield two runs and the game during rhe 
same inning despite Niemiec's one hit, one walk performance for 
the rest of the way. B.C. batsmen were collared by the Indians' 
Fran Maloney. 

Pro-like hitting from Joe Kelly, Gerry Hamel, and Bob Martin 
evened the season's record at 2-2 as the Eagles dropped Brandeis, 
10-6, and M.I.T., 5-1. Hamel's three hits drove four runs across 
the plate as Jim Curtin got the win against the visiting Judges. 
A four run fifth put the game out of reach of our Waltham 
neighbors. 

Slick infielding and a neat six hitter by Bill Robinson were the 
coup-de-grace in the M.I.T. affair. Standout Dick Tierney belted 
a two run homer that gave Robby an all-important early lead. 

Bob Niemiec came up with his second straight masterpiece 
against the hosting Colby. Both teams had to settle for a scoreless 
tie, since neither side was able to score in the 0-0 encounter at 
frigid Lewiston, Maine. Two walks and three hits were all that 
Bobby allowed. 








'■"■ : I v 



< I ■ 




Beaver Martin rifles a drive into the 
Tufts outfield for two bases during the 
victorious opener. 



Diamond-Men Post Winning Season 



The Friars from Providence made their annual visit three days 
later and received an 11-1 lacing for their efforts. Usseglio with 
two hits and two R.B.I.'s along with a superb performance by 
Joe Kelly, were the deciding factors on the offensive side of the 
ledger. George Giersch provided the defense with a solid seven 
hitter that stymied the visitors for nine rain-filled innings. 

The next quartet of games were the only real low point of the 
season. Boston University, behind the pitching talents of Emo 




DiNitto, and the slugging of Gene Prebola were a little too much 
for the erratic Eagles, who were handcuffed by a total of five 
errors that spelled the B.C. downfall. Stebbins and Tierney had 
the run producing hits. 

Amherst came up with a four run seventh that wiped out a 
4-4 tie and handed the Heights-men their fourth loss of the year. 
B.C. came back with a two run rally in the eighth and a Chuck 
Chevalier home run in the ninth, but were unable to push across 
the tying marker which died on third base. 

A one man team Chet Boulris, put the halters on the locals as 
Harvard came out on the long end of a 6-1 score. Boulris sent five 
runs across the plate, and made two outstanding plays in the field 
to highlight an all-Cambridge afternoon. 

Tufts captured their second in a row from the Eagles who once 
again lacked an offense. The Jumbos carried a 2-0 lead into the 
fifth during which Pete McLaughlin and Bob Martin doubled in 
the tying markers. Tufts scored the winner on two errors in the 
eighth. 

Bill Robinson was the big reason for the season's stretch drive 
by starting B.C. off on a seven-game winning streak with a pair 
of decisions over Providence and Northeastern. Gerry Hamel 
drove in the winning run in the Friar return match with an 
eighth-inning single. 

Robby came on in relief against Northeastern in the seventh, 
and throttled the Huskies with one hit for three innings. Hamel 
and Kelly had two hits apiece, and scored six of the nine runs. 

Suffolk University blew an early 7-4 lead, regained it 10-8, and 
then saw it dissolve as Hamel, McLaughlin and Usseglio drove in 
eighth-inning runs to extend the win streak to three. 



140 



All Harvard eyes look anxiously toward right field 
while Martin capitalizes on the smash and churns 
for the plate. 



After a Brandeis forfeit-victory, Bobby Niemiec reversed his 
4-2 loss to B.U. by topping the Terriers via the same 4-2 score, 
allowing but six hits and three walks as batterymate Dick 
McLaughlin belted another two-run round-tripper. 

St. Peter's of New Jersey committed six errors and their pitching 
staff did little else but fatten up B.C. batting averages. Dick 
Tierney had a four bagger and Bob Martin three R.B.I. 's to pace 
the home attack in a 12-2 win. 

Bob Niemiec scattered four hits and came through with another 
top-notch performance as B.C. romped over Northeastern, 7-1. 
Kelly, Hamel, and Stebbins had two hits apiece and drove in five 
of the seven runs. 

The Holy Cross series which wrapped up the season saw the 
Eagles take two of the three games. 

In the opener, the Crusaders pushed across two runs in the final 
frame to secure a 5-4 decision. Two errors and a wild pitch were 
the reasons for the last inning defeat at Worcester. 

It was B.C.'s turn to pull one out of the fire in the first of a 
brace of home games at Alumni Field. Doubles by Stebbins, 
Hamel, and Martin pushed across two runs in the bottom of the 
ninth for a 3-2 win. Bob Niemiec was again brilliant as he turned 
back the Cross on five hits and four walks. 

The rubber game of the series was another thriller; a solid 
eight hit performance was the backbone of a 5-3 victory. Graham, 
Stebbins, Martin, Hamel, and Usseglio drove in runs as B.C. never 
relinquished the lead. 




Coach Eddie Pellagrin! and equipment manager, Ralph Delia Russo, 
inventory baseball uniforms before setting forth on a winning season. 



1959-1960 Boston College Baseball Squad. 
Ill I "J?W 





GOLF 



Golf team members enthusiastically (and optimistically) pose amidst the now-traditional 
March snows, hoping in the meantime for that patch of green which carries a promise of 
lush fairways and sun baked roughs. (Front) Ted Huff, Kevin Folan, Jim Burke. (Rear) 
Jack McAuliffe, Bob Rudman, Peter Manning, Larry Sanford, Ed Wallwork. 



The Boston College Golf Team, with the 
departure of the '59 seniors, lost four of its 
starting seven members. However, the squad 
this year has been bolstered by three outstand- 
ing sophomores, Larry Sanford, Jim Burke, and 
Peter Manning who succeeded somewhat in 
taking up the slack. 

The returning members of the team Ted 
Huff, Kevin Folan and Capt. Jack McAuliffe 
formed the nucleus of another winning B.C. golf 
squad, helped out to a great extent by "Biffer" 
Kelley and Ed Wallwork. 

The team's schedule this year included the 
Miami Invitational Golf Tourney in Coral 
Gables and the Eastern Intercollegiate Tourney 
at the Pittsburgh Field Club. In addition, matches 
against Harvard, B.U., Williams, Holy Cross, 
Providence and Brandeis were slated for the 
B.C. professionals. 

The home matches were played at the Charles 
River County Club in Newton Centre where 
the '59 team was so successful. Prospects at the 
time of this writing, as a result of much Miami 
"conditioning," point to another victorious 
season. 



The Tarn A.C. battles the Little Knicks in an early spring Softball contest. 



INTRAMURALS 

In keeping with the intention of Boston 
College to develop a graduate both spiritually 
and physically conditioned, a campus-wide ath- 
letic program of intramural sports has long-been 
the source of much interclass rivalry. Intramurals 
serve to channel the pent-up athletic interests of 
the students, and to offer them a well-balanced 
program of recreation. 

Each section traditionally has a team to 
defend all challenges to its athletic honor and 
prowess. Once the gauntlet has been thrown, 
any and usually all from the section rise to the 
occasion and prepare to do battle in the arena 
of football, softball, handball, squash and occa- 
sionally hockey. Ability in any of these sports 
is customarily far surpassed by imaginative ille- 
galities and even more imaginative war-crys and 
team names, e.g. Malloy A.C, Bud Club, Hands 
Off, Cafe T.R., No Kidding, Kant Win. 

Regularly scheduled games insure that all par- 
ticipants have an equal opportunity to land play- 
off berths in the renowned I.M. champion- 
ship competitions. Round afcer round only 
serves to increase tension, tempers, and com- 
petitive spirit, until the victors vanquish all 
comers and emerge with coveted laurels. 





Mmph . . . mutual left hooks and left jabs 
are perfected graphically and practically as 
intramural boxing takes on the aspects of a 
gladiatorial contest. 



Agility on the handball court tunes muscles and perfects coordination for intramural devotees. 



Roberts Center provides facilities and equip- 
ment for workouts on the squash, handball, and 
basketball courts. More energetic souls, prefer- 
ring the strenuous arts of wrestling, judo, and 
weightlifting, find in Roberts many competitors 
ready to challenge their skills in these sports. 

In summary, the I.M. program has a positive 
role to play in the University's efforts to produce 
sound minds in sound bodies, and to date has 
enjoyed commendable success. 




Extensive facilities in Roberts Center 
provide opportunities for all categories 
of conditioning. 



Breaking in their racquets and the latest in 
sportswear, in anticipation of the April- 
vacation safari no doubt, are two Robert- 
sonian enthusiasts. 




A 



The A&S Senior Loungers — (or the Philo- 
sophical Psychologists, or maybe even the 
Wolfpacks? ) well, in any case — some team 
or other displays the aggressive spirit char- 
acteristic of intramural games. 



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ACADEMICS 





In vain will the casual observer seek to discover the true 
life of any college by an examination merely of ivy-colored 
walls, boisterous cafeterias or other such superficial aspects 
of the traditional collegiate scene. 

For although college life is inevitably associated with 
these very apparent surface realities, any attempt to restrict 
it to them alone can result in nothing but a frightening 
concept of charcoal-gray nonsense. 

No, the vital energy of which these things are but shadows, 
lies below the surface and requires keen perception and 
mature analysis if it is to be known in depth at all. 

Along about junior year, our student has graduated from 
the freshmen awe and sophomore preoccupation with extra- 
curricular affairs, Bermuda trips, and meetings under the 
Biltmore clock. His is the discovery of a seeming contra- 
diction, that the life of a college is as different as the indi- 
viduality of his fellow classmates, and yet its nature and 
purpose are one — ■ to seek the heights of truth in the interest 
of a profound knowledge of self and of all about him. 

Translating this realization into action is the only justifi- 
cation for terming him "a scholar," or "student." For only by 
doing so, will he be living a college life in fact, and realizing 
the beginnings of a life in depth. 



146 







DEPTH 



147 



\ 




148 




Students of the A&S Honors Program gather informally in O'Connell Hall to hear Edward A. 
Weeks, Jr. (lower right) , Editor of The Atlantic. 




Honors 
Programs 



Facial expressions seem to betray differences of opinion among the senior members of the School of 
Education Honors Program: Pat Carty, Rosemary Beagan, Maureen Keohane, Mary Brown, and 
Donna MacCharles. 



Panelists Tim Tonra, Jack Burke, Ed Powers, and 
Joel O'Brien query Robert Ciquilette, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Overseas Division of Dewey and Almy 
Company after the year's initial business-forum 
presented by the C.B.A. Honors Program. 





Very Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 
Twenty-second President of Boston College 



150 




Rev. William V. E. Casey, S.J. 
Academic Vice-President 



University Administration 




Rev. Thomas Fleming, S.J. 
Treasurer 



Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 
Secretary of the University 








Rev. Francis C. Mackin, S.J. 

Executive Assistant to the President 



Presidential, 
Business, 

Admissions, 



Rev. John E. Murphy, S.J. 
Business Manager 





Rev. Edmond D. Walsh, S.J. 
Director of Admissions 



Library, Housing Staffs 




Rev. Brendan C. Connolly, S.J. 
Director of Libraries 







3WM 




BHL -<?' 




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I'lMl'll I 111 lillf all ^H BRHB 


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IIUIU 



Rev. Terence L. Connolly, S.J. 
Curator of Special Collections 



Rev. David F. Carroll, S.J. 
Director of Resident Students 





.JBI< 




Rev. Frederick J. Adelmann, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Philosophy 



Father McCarthy explains the principles "prime matter and substantial 
form" to a bewildered senior in front of Fulton Hall. 



Only the individual student can determine the fruitfulness of countless hours with Plato, Aristotle, and Thomas. 



154 






On the steps of Lyons Hall that last syllogism becomes maddenly 
elusive just before the trip to the board of final oral examinations. 

Next, Special Metaphysics, after outlining the four Aristotelian 
causes and their relation to the universe, deals with such problems 
as creation, hylomorphic theory, physical laws and miracles. In 
General and Special Ethics the senior relies on the principles 
derived from the previously mastered philosophy courses to 
consider man as a moral agent in all his human actions, the end 
of man, the norm of morality and the natural law. The concrete, 
practical actions of man give rise to discussion and evaluation 
from an ethical standpoint for the purpose of familiarizing the 
future graduate with methods of solving the day-to-day moral 
crises which confront all men. 



The University libraries house the many volumes of St. Thomas and 
Aristotle that soon become a necessity to the Philosophy major. In the 
quiet of afternoon the student is free to wander through the special 
Philosophy sections to clarify, expand, and apply the principles he has 
recently met in classroom lectures. 



Philosophy 



In order to understand any great mind, it is necessary to under- 
stand the varied historical influences that have contributed to its 
formation. For this reason the Department of Philosophy offers 
the undergraduate student an opportunity to major in this field 
by electing certain historical courses in philosophy to supplement 
the required systematic courses. 

The Philosophy Department is quite unlike many of the other 
undergraduate departments of the University in that it seeks not 
to prepare the student for any particular field; but rather strives to 
impart a deep awareness of the individual's place in this world. 
Philosophy widens the students mental perspective in direct 
contrast to the narrowness which is so often associated with one 
who undertakes early specialization in some isolated field of study. 

In Logic, the student is exposed to the basic principles of the 
Aristotelian system, principles which develop precise and orderly 
habits of thinking. Epistemology considers the problem of human 
knowing and its certitudes, and introduces the student to critical 
problems in the history of Philosophy, and to methods of proof. 
It further evaluates man's sense and intellectual knowledge both 
analytically and historically. The metaphysics of reality based on 
the existential principles of Thomistic philosophy follow in 
General Metaphysics. 



On the main facade of Lyons Hall the inscription "You will come to know 
the truth and the truth will set you free," sums up the aspiring philoso- 
pher's goal in his search for truth. 




9 WJtrtB&i* 



Economics 



Majors in Economics have various objectives in mind. Some are 
interested in becoming professional economists, and intend to 
pursue graduate study. Some aim ultimately at teaching Economics 
or serving as professional consultants with either the government 
or with private business firms. Ohers choose Economics because 
they desire a helpful and practical background before entering 
business. For many it provides invaluable preparation for the 
study of law. 

The Economics Department, which embraces all fields of eco- 
nomic thought, offers to each individual student the type of course 
which will best prepare him for his chosen profession. Economists 
study the whole process through which man makes a living. They 
study the organization of industries; the labor supply and its use; 
the commercial banking and credit structure, government finance, 
both local and national; international trade and how it is financed; 
the national income and wealth, its production and distribution; 
the growth and shifts in population; standards of living; and the 
use and conservation of land and natural resources. These courses 



aim at an understanding of the operation of economic systems, 
which are organized units designed to produce and distribute 
material wealth for a whole community of men. The system may 
be on a national scale, or it may be the individual enterprise; for 
both are organized wholes. Thus it is this orientation of study 
toward knowledge of the operation of an economic community 
as a whole that distinguishes an economist from a business 
specialist. 

The Business Administration student who concentrates in 
Economics is especially concerned over the relationship between 
business and the environment in which it must function. He is 
concerned with problems of fiscal policy and the influence of 
government action upon business. He studies the dynamic factors 
of our economy which bear so much importance for America's 
businessmen. Such factors include business cycles, seasonal changes, 
inflationary and deflationary influences, and the repercussions of 
world financial conditions on the domestic economy. 









Lab instruction serves to elucidate the fine points covered in Statistical Analysis for a group of Economics majors. 
Dr. de Roover pinpoints the Malthusian theory of 
population for a group of his students in History of 
Economic Thought. 





Professor Dunfey reviews two sophomore blue books following what 
seems to be a disastrous mid-year examination. 



157 



History and Government 




Between classes students catch up on the past with informal study sessions 
which may form anywhere on those mild spring days. 



Students choosing History and Government as their field of 
study take two years of a prescribed course in European History, 
a one year prescribed course in American Government, and at 
least one year of American History. In his last two years, the 
student follows a sequence which is selected in order to pursue 
some specific educational or vocational objective. This course- 
sequence prepares the student for the following objectives: law, 
foreign service, government administration, graduate study in 
History of Government, teaching of History and Social Studies, 
business ( where specific business courses are not required ) , and 
journalism in public affairs. 

The historian strives to learn and understand government, to 
understand the life, the wars, and the religion of our ancestors, as 
well as to discover the beauties of their artistic creations and 
literary works. Besides broadening the student's liberal arts back- 
ground, History gives the interested student the opportunity not 
merely to admire the descriptions of others of the past, but also 
to express a growing mastery of certain attractive phases of the 
story of Western civilization. The well disciplined History major 
achieves a balance of judgment; and, with a striving for accuracy 
and wider understanding of human differences, will be prepared 
to enter any profession with a true liberal arts foundation. 





Suspicions confirmed . . . knowing smiles of glee do accompany final exam planning 
in faculty inner sanctums . . . fourth floor, Lyons. 



Paul T. Heffron, Ph.D. 

Chairman, Department of History and Government 



158 



The student who has chosen Government as his major field 
considers the basic concepts of political science. He concerns 
himself with the historical origins and development of American 
national government with special emphasis on various pressure 
groups, political parties, elections, Congress and the President. 
Further, he pursues the study of the organization, functions, and 
legislative philosophy of the U.S. Congress. 




Mr. Redmond J. Allman, Assistant Professor, gathers lecture-material for 
his History course. 





Christopher Dawson (right), professor of Roman 
Catholic Studies at Harvard Divinity School becomes 
the first honorary member ever inducted into the 
Boston College chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu, National 
Jesuit Honor Society. Very Rev. Michael P. Walsh, 
S.J., president of Boston College, presents the award to 
Mr. Dawson as Alpha Sigma Nu president, Don 
Palmer, looks on. 



Father Mahoney traces the course of United States affair 
with our "bearded" neighbors in the Caribbean for hi 
History class. 



159 




Mathematics 



In industry today, countless career opportunities exist for 
the student who has mastered the principles of mathematics 
and can intelligently apply them to a current situation. The 
mathematician is sought for government work, insurance 
and statistical work, computing laboratories, actuarial re- 
search, teaching, and graduate positions. 

The student choosing this curriculum begins his Freshman 
course in Mathematics with a modified introduction to 
Differential and Integral Calculus which is continued in 
sophomore year. These introductory courses emphasize the 
concepts and methods used in modern mathematics. In 
junior and senior year, the student has a choice of a major 
field from the following electives: Theory of Equations, 
Higher Algebra, Differential Equations, Higher Geometry, 
Vector Analysis, Advanced Calculus, Infinite Processes, and 
Statistics. 



Professor Robert J. LeBlanc, introduces his class of freshmen to the 
principles of General College Math. 



Father Bezuszka explains to a group of teachers from the 
Boston area the history of the science during the Boston 
College Mathematics Institute. 





oiyf- uyz ' 



<^/> 



Rev. Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Mathematics 



The problem of balancing equations is basic to the successful mathema- 
tician. 




Here at Boston College, the Mathematics Department, 
under the direction of Fr. Bezuszka, boasts of the Boston 
College Mathematics Institute which is instrumental in 
encouraging teachers already in service to undertake his 
advanced course in modern math. Recently the Institute was 
granted five separate sums from the National Science Foun- 
dation for further development of Modern Mathematics and 
at present the total grant is in the vicinity of $500,000. 

Fr. Bezuszka has been instrumental in founding a unique 
program of mathematical studies: that of teaching a group 
of talented young srudents from high schools in the Boston 
area; and that of showing teachers the most effective way 
to present his new system of mathematics. Included in this 
instruction is a history of the field which endeavors to show 
that the ideas of science, naturally accepted today, were the 
result of hard work, trial and error. 

The program is indeed unique in that the binary system, 
an important concept in modern computation, is introduced 
on as low a level as the third grade. However, most of the 
subject matter is taught in the eighth and high school 
grades, for which there is a carefully planned four year 
course including Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Ana- 
lytical Geometry, and Calculus. 



lol 




Bob Keating's bluebook is the subject under discussion as Professor Hines offers some constructive 
criticism in a post-exam conference in the English office high in the inner recesses of Lyons. 





Professor Edward L. Hirsh plans a course change in the varied curriculum 
which the Department makes available to all those interested in English 
as a field of concentration. 



Richard E. Hughes, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of English 




162 



English 



Primarily an English major is not training himself for any 
specific vocation. Students who formerly majored in English, 
however, are now especially active in the following fields: graduate 
and professional studies; teaching; writing, both creative and 
commercial; editorial work; public relations; advertising; and 
business. 

The student who majors in English is offered a variety of 
courses ranging from fourteenth century literature to modern 
prose, from early drama to creative writing. His understanding 
and, with it, his enjoyment of literature may be developed through 
intensive study of a single author ( Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton ) , 
through the mastery of an entire period (for example, the 
eighteenth century, the Victorian period ) , and through the survey 
of a nation's literary history (American Literature). The imme- 
diate satisfaction in such a study is the knowledge of man's various 
responses to the world, and of human values as they have been 
imaginatively expressed with all the resources of our native 
language. 

On the ground level, so to speak, the fledgling English major 
is taught how to recognize and produce clarity, effectiveness, and 



correctness in diction, and in the construction of sentences and 
paragraphs. This aim is achieved partially through reading and 
analysis of selected essays and short stories, but more especially, 
through the student's own efforts in writing. Through intensive 
contact with poetry, the student strives to stimulate his own 
imagination both in composition of critical papers and in class- 
room discussions. 

In Rhetoric the student attempts to realize in the present day 
a tradition stemming from the Ratio Studiorum. Rhetoric culti- 
vates the ability to grasp and communicate effectively through 
the medium of the varied prose forms of our time. The chief 
means to this end are the precepts of composition and style as 
found in both the prose and poetry classics of our language. The 
mastery of these means, which together shape a basic discipline 
underlying and applicable to all forms of discourse, are furthered 
by a study of texts ranging from Aristotle and Swift, to the 
present. 




A frequently seen student-teacher meeting after class . . . students are 
encouraged to visit their instructors often during the semester to clear up 
questionable subjects and to seek advice. 



The Francis Thompson Plaque occupies a place of honor amidst his 
original manuscripts housed in the Thompson Room of Bapst Library. 





Rev. Richard W. Rousseau, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Theology 



Theology 





In a sense all students at Boston College carry a Theology major. 
For four years each student within the University is instructed in 
the centuries-old liturgy and profound beliefs of his religion. In 
his first year the student studies the ancient Scriptures of his Faith 
and seeks within them the story of Man and God. The Bible's 
place in the Church is discussed from the viewpoint of inspiration 
and inerrancy, and literary form. The literary, historical, and 
theological analyses of the Gospels are examined in relation to 
Chrisr, and in particular to His claim of Divine Sonship. 

The origin of the Church in the Gospels, the Acts of the 
Apostles, and the Pauline Epistles are further studied, thus 
enabling the student to discover the operations and teachings of 
the primitive Church. The Liturgy or inner life of the Mystical 
Body is explained, and the Church's renewal of the dogmatic facts 



of redemptive history are considered in detail. The Mass, its 
meaning, development, and structure, and the Mystical Body of 
Christ complete the first half of the student's instruction in 
Theology. 

After a detailed consideration of Faith and revealed truth, God, 
Unity and Trinity, Divine Providence, and Original Sin, the 
student explores one of the Church's most important dogmas — 
that of Redemption. Through the study of the Redemption the 
student learns of Jesus Christ, God and Man, Priest and Redeemer; 
and Mary, the Mother of God. Sanctifying grace and its part in 
the Redemptive process, as well as actual grace, are then defined 
and explained. 

To complete his formal course in Theology the student is 
presented the sacramental system and the importance of each 
sacrament in the worship of the Church. 



164 





Father Donahue reiterates for an attentive co-ed the symbolism found in 
the early chapters of Genesis. 



A senior theology section discusses with Father 
Shea the principles of Sacramental Theology, a 
course with practical application immediately evi- 
dent after graduation. 





Officers of the Boston College R.O.T.C. Instructor Group discuss the administrative problems which 
occur daily in rhe guidance of the thousand-man Corps of Cadets. 



Department of Military 
Science and Tactics 




Lieuter 
Chairman. 



ant Colonel Philip R. Cibotti, Jr., U.S.A. 
Department of Military Science and Tactics 



The Army R.O.T.C. Unit and the Department of Military 
Science and Tactics offers to all male students within the Univer- 
sity a four-year elective course to enable them to become junior 
officers in the United States Army Reserve. The objective of the 
course of instruction in Military Science is to produce officers who, 
by their education, training, and inherent qualities, are suitable 
for continued development as Reserve Army officers. For those 
students who show exceptional talent along the prescribed lines 
a limited number of commissions are offered in the Regular Army 

In the basic course, R.O.T.C. students attend two hours of class- 
room instruction and one drill each week during the academic year. 
The courses include instruction in school of the soldier, exercise of 
command, organization of the Army, American Military History, 
and individual weapons and marksmanship. Familiarization with 
all types of infantry crew-served weapons in use by the Army, map 
and aerial photograph study, and the role of the Army in the 
National Defense Team are the topics studied by sophomore 
R.O.T.C. cadets. 

The advanced course requires the student to attend four hours 
of classroom instruction and one drill each week. Classroom in- 
struction is devoted primarily to leadership, military teaching 
methods, small unit tactics, communications, and familiarization 
with the organization, function, and mission of the arms and serv- 
ices of the Army. Actual exercise of command by students is 
graded and emphasized during drill periods. Students also attend 
a six-weeks summer camp where they are given an opportunity to 
put into practice many of the principles which they have learned 
in the classroom. Students are then selected for branch assignment 
in the senior academic year. 



166 




Frequent exams keep these senior-course R.O.T.C. students familiar with staff, tactical, 
and administrative aspects of our pentomic Army. 



R.O.T.C. cadets at summer training . . . here cadets 
gain experience in hurriedly crossing an engineer 
assault-bridge at Fort Devens, Mass. 




An N.C.O. instructor points out factors changing the trajectory of a fired round to basic course 
R.O.T.C. students. 



The Drill Team and color guard flank the altar at the annual Military 
Mass which is celebrated by Father Rector. 




Cadets from Boston College blend voices at summer camp, Fort Devens, 
Mass. for the singing of the Alma Mater. John Olszewski, Tom Cummings, 
Paul Campanella, Don Palmer, Joe Nadeau, Ed O'Leary, Gerry Ferrera. 





168 





The magnificence of Gasson tower, the hallmark of the 
University, looms far above the surrounding spires on the 
Heights. From near or far, its stately perfection and grace 
capture the eye's attention; and once beheld, beckons the 
observer to admire once again its singular beauty. For it 
has no equal. 

Fittingly enough, within its shadow, within the walls of 
this University's oldest building upon which this tower rises 
lies the College of Arts and Sciences, the source of our tradi- 
tion since 1863, and, more important, the builder of the 
true and finished man of character. 

An analogy between the tower and such a man need not 
be forced. Indeed, the comparison is more obvious than 
contrived. 

For just as the pinnacles of the tower pierce the heavens 
in their symbolic architectural quest for Truth and the 
Almighty, so too man seeks to exceed the bounds of his 
physical stature by adding these imperceptible but very real 
intellectual and spiritual cubits which mark him as a true 
and finished man of character, a man not of mere words, 
but of deeds. 

This man is the product of a Liberal Arts Education, the 
product of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

It is from the successful formation of such a man that the 
Jesuit tradition of Liberal Arts derives its unique excellence, 
always with the ultimate goal of perfecting natural ability; 
of disciplining the mind to clear, accurate, logical thinking; 
of developing a facility for effective self-expression; and 
most important of all, of implanting, nurturing, and deep- 
ening the knowledge of ethical values and of Catholic 
heritage. 

The student should, be induced to work at his studies and 
develop himself by self-activity rather than by passive 
listening; apart from the mere acquisition of information, 
the natural powers and talents of the students must receive 
training and development. 

— Ratio Studiorum — 



College of Arts 
and Sciences 




169 




Administrative Faculty 




Rev. William V. E. Casey, S.J. 
Dean 



Henry J. McMahon, A.M. 
Assistant Dean 



Weston M. Jenks, Jr., M.Ed. 
Director of Guidance 




Rev. Richard G. Shea, S.J. 
Student Counsellor 



170 



of the College of Arts and Sciences 




Rev. Joseph L. Shea, S.J. 
Dean of Men . 




The Rotunda in Gasson Hall pulses with life as classes break, and students rush to lectures, 
labs and, of course, those inevitable tests. 



f 



Eileen M. Tosney, A.M. 
Registrar 





Extensive and practical laboratory equipment such as the model circulatory system pictured above 
is of inestimable help to pre-meds in supplementing textbook illustrations and diagrams. 



Biology 



Chemistry 



The Biology courses are planned to enable students to obtain 
knowledge of living things, their structure and function. These 
courses may be a part of their general education or a major field 
of concentration requiring thorough preparation for the study of 
medicine, or graduate work in the Biological sciences. In his 
freshman year the student treats of Biology as such, and of its 
subdivisions: protoplasm, cell mitosis and meiosis, vital functions, 
survey of the divisions of the plant kingdom, detailed study of 
representatives from these divisions including the histology of the 
vegetative and reproductive organs of spermatophytes, survey of 
invertebrates, animal tissue, system of organs, and dissection of 
invertebrate specimens. 

Comparative Vertebrate Embryology and Histology which is a 
study of microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of the 
mammalian body, are taken up in connection with Genetics and 
hereditary principles. Microbiology, Comparative Anatomy, and 
Ecology further engage the student in his preparation for his 
chosen profession. 

The study of vital functions in various animals makes up the 
subject matter for Comparative Physiology. Also included in this 
study is the physico-chemical structure of protoplasm, regulation 
of cell contents and activities, membrane permeability, osmosis 
and inhibition. 

For the prospective chemist, the Chemistry Department offers a 
curriculum designed to give an education in Chemistry pervaded 
by a liberal arts atmosphere. In the first three years he covers the 
four fundamental branches of Chemistry: Inorganic, Analytical, 
Organic and Physical. Advanced work is undertaken in senior year 
according to the approved plan of the American Chemical Society. 



A sufficient variety of advanced courses is offered to suit the needs 
of the student who looks forward to graduate study, or the student 
who will go immediately into industry or teaching. Additional 
elective courses in Biology, Physics and Mathematics are also 
available. 

When the student nears the end of his junior year, he is guided 
in the selection of his senior electives. Such subjects as German, 
Mathematics and Physics are necessary complements of the Chem- 
istry courses. The German Department is approved by the Com- 
mittee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. 



Robert F. O'Malley, M.S. 
Chairman, Department of Chemistry 



111 





A keen understanding of fundamental chemical laws, combined with the 
knowledge of complex analytical calculations are essential for Quantitative 
Analysis. 



Long afternoons of experimentation give the student prac- 
tical experience in executing classroom theory. 



173 




Students receive additional practice in comprehension and conversation through the facilities of the Modern Language Lab. 



Classics 



Modern Languages 



Courses in Classics offered to freshman and sophomores are 
designed primarily for cultural formation, or general education. 
Competence in language and appreciation of literature contribute 
important values for this end. 

For the junior and senior, Classics courses are adapted to the 
varying needs of those who elect them, especially with a view to 
preparation for their vocation or life's work. Students preparing 
for a career in law will find the accurate study of texts helpful for 
their personal development in both original and independent 
work. Those contemplating a vocation to the priesthood will find 
it advantageous to concentrate on the ancient languages in antici- 
pation of theological studies. For students who desire proximate 
preparation for teaching the Classics either on the high school or 
the university level, much profit will be derived from the courses 
in which classical scholarship in the light of modern research is 
the primary interest. Still others will find in classical studies helpful 
knowledge of a literary and historical nature for their lives as 



educated men taking their place in the present-day world of 
intricate political and social relations. 

Today a degree in a modern language is automatically, but 
mistakenly, associated with the teaching profession. For in addi- 
tion to teaching, other areas open to Modern Language students 
are diplomatic service, official translators, interpreters, and foreign 
trade. 

Students who take Modern Languages as their field of concen- 
tration have a choice of French, German, or Spanish. The usual 
requirements are completion of a second-year college language 
course, and departmental recommendation. The undergraduate 
courses, both required and elective, are planned to give the student 
an intimate acquaintance with the modern forms of the language 
spoken in the principle foreign countries. Systematic attention is 
paid to pronunciation, reading, syntax, and conversation. Special 
emphasis is laid on the study of the literature and civilization of 
these countries. 



174 



I* 




Rev. Joseph D. Gauthier, S.J 
Chairman, Department of Modern 



MmmJ 






Tony Arlotto finds in the Honors Seminar library a wide selection of the 
great books of all ages and civilizations. 

Rev. Leo P. McCauley, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Classics 





Dr. McCrossen and Chris Morton seemed pleased with the Heights' 
coverage of the new Oriental Literature course offered by the Modern 
Language Department. 



Natural Sciences 



The Department of Physics offers a balanced program of 
classical and modern physics leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science, with a major in Physics. 

The sequence of courses, integrated with the accompanying 
courses in mathematics aim primarily at preparing the gifted 
student for graduate study in physics. At the same time it en- 
deavors to communicate to the student the basic theoretical and 
experimental techniques requisite for employment and advance 
as a professional physicist. While all courses in this curriculum 
are at present prescribed, special arrangements for admission to 
candidacy for this degree may be made for those exceptional stu- 
dents who, in the judgment of the Department, give promise of 
significant contributions to the field of Physics. 

In addition a program leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, with major in Physics, is also offered with a wide selection 
of elective courses available. Admission to this curriculum is con- 
tingent upon the successful completion of six semester hours of 
calculus and eight of general college physics. 

Ranging from an introductory course in General Physics which 
is a thorough introduction to the principles and applications of 
classical mechanics, to the study of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, 
the curriculum is so designed that students may choose electives 
in such fields as electronics, magnetism, optical study, and acoustics. 




Rev. William G. Guindon, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Physics 



The Physics Department offers a special 
course in which problems and measure- 
ments of medical physics are given special 
laboratory treatment. 



176 





Rev. James W. Skehan, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Geology 



In the understanding of Natural Sciences, the student must 
be able to demonstrate and explain the key theories and 
fundamental concepts in Physics and Chemistry that have 
led to the present position of atomic science. 




Samples of major types of rocks and minerals are provided so 
that the student can attain a more profound insight into the 
earth's development through its geological periods. 



Geology 



The newest department within the University is the 
Geology Department, conceived and founded to enable the 
student to obtain a thorough and extensive background for 
whatever area of Earth Science he may choose for concen- 
trated higher studies in senior year or in graduate school. 

In senior year, and, to some extent, in junior year, the 
courses become somewhat specialized. The entire program 
may be divided generally into "hardrock" and "softrock" 
geology. The former lies within the fields of Geophysics, 
Geochemistry, Engineering Geology, Petrology, Structural 
Geology, and Mineralogy. For "hardrock" geology, a solid 
foundation in Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics is abso- 
lutely essential. The latter embraces Glacial Geology, Paleon- 



tology, and Stratigraphy. Both fields demand solid back- 
ground in Biology and Chemistry as prerequisites. 

The Department of Natural Sciences deals with the prin- 
ciples of Physical Science and the basic problems of the 
earth on which we live. The comprehensive introduction to 
the origin and development of the key concepts and funda- 
mental theories in Physics and Chemistry that have led to 
the present position of atomic science is given the student 
over a two semester period. The student is then presented 
with an introductory examination of the geological processes 
at work on the earth, and of the earth's development through 
its geological periods. 



177 




J 



The pre-med quickly learns to familiarize himself with the various organs of the human body as well 
as their intricate functions contributing to the entire human physical structure. 



Pre-Medical 
Pre-Dental 
Pre-Law 

The approved curriculum of the pre-medical students exceeds 
the entrance requirements of medical schools, and meets the 
demands of the Council on Education of the American Medical 
Association. Pre-medical and pre-dental studies are career choices 
rather than fields of concentration. However, students in these 
programs normally elect Biology as their major field of concen- 
tration. 

Each pre-medical student is thoroughly acquainted with Quan- 
titative Analysis in which he studies the fundamental chemical 
laws, the main points of the theory of solutions of electrolytes as 
applied to volumetric analysis, with emphasis on the calculations 
involved in analytical work. In the laboratory, typical volumetric 
procedures are studied and the fundamental points of analytical 
technique are stressed. 

In Physical Chemistry the candidates are given a course in the 
basic principles of this field, a course that will be of unique value 
to the future medical student. It includes the study of gases and 
liquids, solutions of electrolytes and non-electrolytes, oxidation 
and reduction, and the colloidal state. Most students also take 
Biochemistry which requires a detailed analysis of proteins, carbo- 



hydrates, and fats, the normal metabolism of these substances, and 
the composition and function of the body fluids. Laboratory work 
entails the study of certain biologically important substances, and 
the examination of milk, blood, and urine according to modern 
methods of analysis. 

The minimum quantitative requirement for admission to the 
Boston College Law School as a regular student and candidate 
for the degree of Bachelor of Laws is three-fourths the number of 
credits acceptable for a degree at an approved college or university. 
Specific pre-Iegal courses are not prescribed. 

A sound pre-legal education should develop in the future law 
student an adeptness at reasoning clearly, a facility of accurate 
expression, a mature balance of judgment, and an ability to 
appreciate the moral, social and economic problems involved in 
the administration of justice in modern society. For this purpose, 
a rigorous liberal arts program is recommended. Courses may be 
taken profitably in accounting, in the fields of economics and 
sociology, and in American and English constitutional history. In 
the choice of elective courses, however, the selection of professors 
is more important than the selection of courses. It is strongly 
emphasized that pre-legal students elect professors who exact a 
large volume of work and independent thinking from their classes. 
For law study is arduous and critical; it cannot be pursued success- 
fully by mere cramming of information or by memorizing pre- 
digested professional dicta. 



178 



The human bone structure inevitably supplies an interesting topic 
for aspiring doctors; full scale models help give the student a true 
representation of the perfectly proportioned parts of the body. 





The study of gases, liquids and solutions occupy much time of the 
Pre-Dental student as he makes comparisons in the laboratory. 



Not only does the Law student strive for professional competency, 
but also for an awareness of the question of the nature of man and 
society, the origin and purpose of law, and the lawyer's role in 
society. Pictured at right is the Boston College Law School. 




Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Psychology 




Dr. William Pare' looks over a course syllabus prior to planning his 
next exam. 




The reading required for the Psychology major often entails long 
hours of concentration in one of the University's many libraries. 



180 





Dr. Joseph Cautela meets with one of his small seminar groups to 
discuss the modern theories with which the student majoring in 
Psychology must acquaint himself. 




Psychology 

Sociology 



The undergraduate Department of Psychology is designed to 
meet the needs of three classes of students. Firstly, the department 
aids those who desire a sound cultural background in the study of 
the human personality. Secondly, it provides the necessary assist- 
ance for those who wish to acquire a thorough undergraduate 
training in Psychology as a major field in anticipation of pro- 
fessional graduate study. Thirdly, the aim of the department is to 
satisfy those who wish to obtain a basic understanding of human 
behavior as a supplement to some other major field of concen- 
tration. 

Majors in the field must obtain at least eighteen credits in 
Psychology credit hours; and must include courses in General 
Psychology, Experimental Laboratory Psychology and Statistics. 
It is recommended that such majors fulfill their science-require- 
ment elective in Biology or Physics; and that their minor field of 
concentration be in Sociology, Education or Mathematics. 

The student is first exposed to General Psychology, followed by 
an introduction to the field of modern general psychology with 
special treatment of the sense modalities as well as the psychology 
of sensation and sense perception. Instruction in the study of 
modern general psychology requires special reference to problems 
and psychological experimentation on thought and learning 
processes, memory, emotions and will. 

A degree in undergraduate Sociology is designed primarily to 
prepare the student for graduate study either in the teaching field 
of Sociology or in the field of social work. The first course offered 
the student on the undergraduate level is Introductory Sociology 
which embraces and expounds the principles of Sociology as a 
social science. It presents a survey of basic methods and techniques 
of research, fundamental concepts and theories relative to forms 
of social organization, a survey of modes of social interaction 
and of social processes and changes. The purpose of this course is 
to give the student a grasp of the fundamental facts and problems 
of American Society, and to prepare him for a more advanced 
curriculum. 

A special elective is offered in Sociology of the Family, in view 
of the importance of the family to the individual and to society 
as a whole. Another course, Social Problems, focuses attention on 

social expressions of maladjustment with a view toward their 
amelioration or solution. Electives are also offered in Criminology, 
Urban Sociology, Public Opinion and Propaganda, Industrial 
Sociology, the Social Structures in the United States, Social Wel- 
fare, and timely courses dealing with the Communist society. The 
latter is an extensive analysis of the major institutions of the 
Communist ideology, their functions and interrelations. Com- 
munist institutional structure and organizational stratifications are 
further topics for study within the scope of this course. 



John D. Donovan, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of Sociology 



IS! 




College of Business Administration 




Industrial 
College of 



Management Laboratory, 
Business Administration. 



An insight into the place and goals of the College of Business 
Administration within the University can be had if one merely 
considers the name Fulton Hall. For Father Robert Fulton, S.J., 
during the infancy of Boston College, served as the first Dean of 
Studies, and later, as President for two terms. In addition to his 
close association with the College, Father Fulton, between his 
terms as President, was Provincial of the old New York-Maryland 
Province, of which New England was then a part. Thus it is more 
than coincidence that this College of Business Administration 
bears the name of so apt an administrator. 

Intimately bound up in the word "administrator" are the aims of 
this College. For the word connotes a man professionally trained 
both by school and experience, to perceive quickly, to judge 
correctly and to act promptly in matters of the business world. 

However, it would be quite inaccurate to say that the Business- 
College student is a specialist in a particular field, be it Accounting, 
Economics, Industrial Management or Finance even though 
twenty percent of his credits must be earned in just such areas of 
concentration. But rather, the College of Business Administration 
attempts to impart a knowledge of basic business and economic 
subjects, such as Statistics, Business Law, Money and Banking 
and Economic History, — all with the intent of aiding the student 
to appraise his decisions in the light of their total consequences. 

Nor is the tradition stemming from the Ratio Studiorum lost 
to the student of business who, despite possible naive under- 
graduate prejudices and a seeming preoccupation with his "more 
practical" specialties, more often than not finds, upon graduation, 
such required subjects as English, Foreign Language, History, 
Philosophy and other traditional academic subjects to be the most 
valuable contributions to his education, and the chief factors to 
which his future successes can be attributed. 

Just as the other colleges within the University place special 
emphasis on Philosophy and Theology, as the foundations of the 
truly successful man, so too, the College of Business Administra- 
tion, thoroughly aware of its unique obligation to train future 
business executives with moral and spiritual perspective, seeks 
both to return the world of commerce to the standards of Christ, 
and to equip its graduates for spiritual success by means of 
Christian Philosophy and Theology. 





182 



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183 



Administrative Faculty of 




Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 




Christopher J. Flynn, Jr., A.M. 
Acting Associate Dean 



Rev. Francis B. McManus, S.J. 
Dean of Men 



184 




the College of Business Administration 



Rev. George F. Lawlor, S.J. 
Director of Guidance 





Tom Colligan and Professor Glynn, judging from their 
expressions of concern, go over a balance sheet that appar- 
ently doesn't balance. 



Accounting 




Students concentrating in Accounting are provided with a broad 
understanding of the theory and techniques of accounting. The 
comprehensive training in accountancy prepares students for 
executive positions in business or government, such as controller, 
chief accountant, internal auditor, or budget director; and also 
provides intensive training for students who intend to practice as 
Certified Public Accountants. The accounting curriculum meets 
the educational requirements fixed by law and by the American 
Institute of Accountants. 



While the accounting courses have been planned primarily for 
those who intend to enter public practice, they have inestimable 
value for those who seek entrance into any field of business activity. 

In recent years, business organizations have augmented their 
accounting personnel to meet the increased demands of manage- 
ment for accounting information and procedures. Various federal 
and state departments likewise employ a growing number of 
trained accountants. Although the work in these fields is highly 
specialized, a thorough basic training in Accounting is an absolute 
necessity for the many new positions arising out of our increasingly 
complex economy. 



Professor Lee and a senior Accounting major discuss the theory and pro- ^m 
cedure of auditing which might conceivably appear on the mid-year 
examination. 





Arthur L. Glynn, M.B.A. 
Chairman, Department of Accounting 




The Industrial Management major quickly learns the importance of specifications and problems con- 
cerned with design, use and operating data of standard machine-tools in the Management Lab. 



Industrial 
Management 



The objective of the Department of Industrial Management is 
twofold: to provide a working knowledge of the production func- 
tion of business from the point of view of the business man who 
is responsible for the successful management of its organization, 
operation and control; and to impart both an appreciation of the 
problems faced by top-level management and a sound philosophy 
that may be utilized in their solution. 

The program is so constructed as to give, in logical order, the 
various steps covered in the manufacturing process. In his first 
year of concentration in this field, the junior studies the problems 
involved in the procurement of materials and supplies. He is also 
made aware of the technical aspects involved in the operation of 
the personnel department without, however, causing him to lose 
sight of the fact that the term "personnel" is synonymous with 
human beings — a concept that is emphasized throughout the 
program. 

Thus, after the complexities involved in bringing together 
workers, material and equipment have been demonstrated, the 
courses offered in senior year are designed to show how they are 
best coordinated. The functions of motion and time study, pro- 
duction control and cost control are developed; and further stress 
is given to the human problems involved through a study of labor 
relations. 



Justin C. Cronin, M.B.A. 
Chairman, Department of Industrial Management 




Financial 

Management 



Financial Management inculcates in the student a thorough 
understanding of the problems connected with the internal finan- 
cial administration of a business. The subject matter includes 
working capital, sales forecasting, cash budgeting, long and short 
term borrowing techniques and a knowledge of the kinds and 
the sources of funds available in the security markets. 

The Finance student must be thoroughly grounded in account- 
ing and corporation finance, analysis of financial statements, source 
and application of funds, cost control, the use of statistics as a 
managerial tool and the influence of taxes, business law and 
economics on management decisions. 

This field of study also offers the student an opportunity to 
acquaint himself with real estate transactions, insurance proce- 
dures, the principles of investment and banking administration. 



Distribution 
Management 

Distribution Management or Marketing analyzes the problems 
of gathering raw materials from the extractive industries, distrib- 
uting them to manufacturers, redistributing semi-processed goods 
for further manufacturing, and finally, seeing the finished product 
through to its consumer. The curriculum is planned for those who 
intend to enter the field of distribution in any of its broad divisions 
such as analysis, sales-management, merchandising, advertising, 
salesmanship and retailing. 

The channels of distribution and the various facilities, services 
and agencies which might be used, are among the subjects covered. 
The analysis of data, the principles and techniques involved in the 
organization and control of a sales force, the nature and the use of 
advertising and the problems peculiar to retailing are discussed 
and mastered. 




Fr. Joyce addresses the annual Distribution Management Conference in downtown Boston. 




Gerald F. Price, Ph.D. 
Chairman, Department of Distribution Management 




Professor McDonald explains to Diego Cisneros some of the problems 
which are common to both this country and South America in the mar- 
keting of finished goods. 



Rev. John J. L. Collins, S.J. 
Chairman, Department of Financial Administration 




General Business 



With the Dean's permission, students may concentrate in 
General Business. This curriculum is especially useful for those 
who plan to associate themselves with smaller firms where func- 
tions are not highly specialized. Students engaged in such a pro- 
gram may make selections from the course-offerings of the various 
departments upon approval by a faculty director. 

In General Business the student is free to choose courses for 
which he has shown an aptitude and has the further privilege of 
his choice of professors. 




Dr. Albery and Chris Morton look over 
Dr. Albery's Foreign Trade course. 



list of future guest speakers for 



Michael Hurley and Paul Hughes comment upon some of the 
displays found in the Industrial Management Exhibition Room. 





Students often require assistance in locating some of the many volumes 
which are housed in the Business School Library. However Jack Mullen, 
though in a hurry, seems hardly perturbed at the slight delay. 



190 



Evening College of 
Arts, Sciences and Business Administration 




Rev. Charles B. Toomey, S.J. 
Dean 




Administrative Faculty 



I 111 I . ... MU 

1 111 1 inn i us - ,m 




Katherine M. Hastings, A.M. 
Registrar 



191 







Fr. Cummiskey, like most faculty, finds time for informal and informative 
chats. 




Evening College students are well-rewarded with just such a 
look of wonderment captured above during one of their 
many ambitious programs to aid underprivileged children. 
Work to be done? Spirited Evening College students are 
quick to roll up their sleeves to meet the task. 



192 





Fr. Dunn pauses to reflect before answering a student query in the relaxed 
atmosphere of an Evening College student-faculty mixer. 



Evening College 



The co-educational evening division of Boston College offers 
students who work during the day the opportunity to obtain 
college degrees of Associate in Arts, Bachelor of Arts, and 
Bachelor of Science with a major field of concentration in 
Accounting, Economics, Education, English, History and Govern- 
ment, General Business and Social Sciences. The normal time taken 
by a full-time student for the completion of these degrees is three 
years for the Associate in Arts, and six years for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The six year program 
may be reduced to five years by those students who wish to take 
courses in the day summer-school or in the evening summer 
session. 

The idea of any Liberal Arts education is to give a person a 
genuinely thorough educational background underlying his spe- 
cialized field of elective study. American experiments in excessive 
electivism have already made it evident that such a background is 
desirable and necessary if a college graduate is to have the type of 
culture that is needed for an appreciation of the truly important 
things in life; and the trained mind and mature judgments that are 
required for successful advancement in any business or profession. 
Accordingly, the Liberal Arts basic curriculum at the Boston 
College Evening College includes in each program such funda- 
mental subjects as English Composition and Public Speaking, 
World Literature, History and Government, Sociology and Eco- 
nomics, Philosophy and Theology. 



School of Nursing 




Rita P. Kelleher, M.Ed. 
Dean 



Within the shadow of tradition, the new Nursing School arises to 
foster and perpetuate the century-old Heights' spirit. 

Administrative Faculty 




Catherine M. Crosby, A.B. 
Registrar 




Student nurses flash smiles of approval while supervising construction of the Cushing Hall Library. 




it 







c 



,,, 




■-^ 



x 




More important child-care problems than 
where to place that last safety pin face 
the student-nutse despite the disagree- 
ment of our subject on the scales. 



The measure of the successful nurse is a boundless capacity for patience, 
gentleness, and undetstanding. 



194 







w 



A Boston College School of Nursing Graduate Nurse displays that intangible bit of therapy- 
cheerful smile. 



The General Nursing Faculty Instructor, Miss Florence Brickett, and 
Nursing School Nutritionist, Miss Patricia Brewton, hold a nutritional 
conference with a patient. 



College and university programs in Nursing which lead to a 
baccalaureate degree are designed to serve the needs and purposes 
of qualified students who seek adequate preparation for the 
challenge of the Nursing profession. The program in collegiate 
Nursing Education at Boston College includes a balance of general 
and professional courses and leads to a diploma in Nursing with 
a Bachelor of Science degree. When the student nurse graduates, 
she is eligible for state examinations for licensure as a registered 
nurse, prepared to function as a staff nurse in any setting, as a 
leader of nursing teams, and as a head nurse in hospitals. 

Nursing is planned as the major subject and is taught as a 
service profession for the promotion of individual and family 
health. Professional practice supervised by college faculty in 
hospitals and in community health agencies serves as clinical 
laboratory experience as the student develops nursing skills. She 
learns through demonstration, lecture, discussions, field trips and 
clinical practice in the classroom, hospital, community agencies 
and homes. This program includes experience in Medical and 
Surgical Nursing, Maternal and Child Nursing, Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing and Public Health Nursing. 




Administrative Faculty 




of the School of Education 






Rev. Henry P. Wennerberg, S.J. 
Student Counsellor 



Joseph L. Driscoll, D.Ed. 
Director of Student Teaching 



Elizabeth A. Strain, M.Ed. 
Registrar 




197 




Co-eds pause and chat for a few moments before breaking 
for the first class of the day in Campion Hall. 




School of 
Education 



Wise students find that a moment is well spent when difficulties are resolved, 
and encouragement given in a brief conference with an instructor. 



The "family" concept, peculiar to the 
School of Education, is no more amply 
demonstrated, or manifestly confirmed 
than in this novel cafeteria scene. 



198 





After school there is always time for a skating session at the nearby McHugh Forum. 



The Boston College School of Education, which is co-educa- 
tional, was founded to enable qualified young men and women 
to meet the most exacting teaching-certification requirements and 
to acquire a true culture and a sound philosophy of life. The 
Jesuits, who have repeatedly written significant pages in the 
history of education and continue to be the most active educational 
organization in the Catholic .Church, sponsor at Boston College 
a balanced program of teacher preparation that aims at a blend 
of personal culture and teaching competence. Jesuit and lay pro- 
fessors who conduct classes in the School of Education are, for the 
most part, the same teachers who carry on the centuries-old tradi- 
tion of liberal education in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The demand for qualified elementary school teachers has 
amounted to almost a national crisis during the past decade. No 
field of teaching demands more professional preparation or a 
wider range of ability than the elementary school. The exacting 
nature, as well as the important influence of teaching at this level 
has led progressive communities to introduce salary schedules that 
make no distinction between secondary and elementary school 
teaching positions. More men than ever before are entering the 
upper elementary grades as teachers, and are finding the work 
satisfying and the advancement rapid. The elementary school 
teacher is a "generalist," covering a wide variety of subject-matter 
and school activities. Students, interested in the challenging area 
of child development rather than in a particular academic subject, 
will undoubtedly find elementary school teaching a most reward- 
ing experience. 

Teachers on the secondary school level are more than subject- 
matter specialists. It is true, they must be masters of a particular 
field of knowledge. But they must also be able to help youth meet 
the problems of adolescence. Legal and social pressures keep more 
boys and girls in school today than ever before; consequently 
secondary schools must provide for an ever widening range of 
abilities, backgrounds, and interests. High school is the end of 
formal education for the vast majority of Americans; hence the 
responsibility of transmitting our culture and ideals rests largely 
with the high school teacher. 








■ ■■■■ 

1 

1 



I 





The Faculty of 
Boston College 



200 




1* 



Raymond J. Aherne, Ph.D. 
Finance 




Michael Albery, Ph.D. 
Economics 



Captain Cyrus W. Bassett, 
U.S.A., B.S. 

Military Science 



Robert L. Becker, Ph.D. 
Physics 




^%t-Jh 



*1$?f^ 



^^m 




4 



John R. Betts, Ph.D. 
History 




Gary P. Brazier, Ph.D. 
Government 





Paul A. Boulanger, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 



Alice E. Bourneuf, Ph.D. 
Economics 




the FACULTY of 



Patricia M. Brewton, M.Ed. 

Nursing 




Florence T. Brickett, R.N., M.Ed. 
Nursing 



Richard A. Bruno, M.Ed., M.B.A. Francis M. Buckley, D.Ed. 

Accounting Education 



\ 



Phyllis V. Bromwell, R.N., M.Ed. 
Nursing 





202 






Rev. Joseph P. Carew, S.J. 

Theology 



Robert J. Cahill, Ph.D 
Modern Languages 



W. Dean Burnham, A.M. 
Government 



Rev. James Casey, S.J. 
Theology 




Joseph H. Chen, Ph.D. 

Physics 



Captain Claude W. Cooper, 

U.S.A., A.B. 

Military Science 



Rev. Richard D. Costello, S.J. 
History 



BOSTON COLLEGE 




if*-, fy**- ,\ 




Joseph T. Criscenti, Ph.D. 
History 







lit 



Joseph E. Devine, M.B.A 
Marketing 



Raymond A. deRoover, Ph.D. 
Economics 



Rev. Paul A. Curtin, S.J. 
Theology 



Rev. J. Francis Devine, S.J. 

Theology 



Paul Devlin, M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Accounting 




203 




Antonette DiLoreto, D.Ed. 

Education 




Stanley J. Dmohowski, 

M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Accounting 




Rev. Jeremiah J. Donovan, S.J 
Theology 



Rev. Edward T. Douglas, S.J. 
Theology 





Richard E. Downing, M.S. 
Physics 




Rev. Maurice V. Dullea, S.J. M. Kamil Dziewanowski, Ph.D. 

Theology History 




Barbara A. Elbery, M.Ed. 
Education 



Harold H. Fagan, M.S., LL.B. 
Chemistry 



the FACULTY of 




Rev. Ernest B. Foley, S.J. 
Economics 



Joseph Figurito, D.M.L. 
Modern Languages 



Rev. George R. Fuir, S.J. 
Philosophy 



John J. Fitzgerald, Ph.D. 
English 



204 





Rev. Merrill F. Greene, S.J. 
Philosophy 



Owen A. Hanley, A.M. 
Modern Languages 



George F. G. Grob, A.M 
English 



Rev. Martin P. Harney, S.J. 
History 




is 





Vincent A. Harrington, 
M.B.A., LL.B. 
Business Law 



Rev. Robert A. Hewitt, S.J. 
Theology 



Rev. John A. Hinchey, S.J. 
Philosophy 



BOSTON COLLEGE 





Leo J. Hines, A.M. 
English 



Marion J. Jennings, Ph.D. 
Education 



Louis O. Kattsoff, Ph.D. 
Mathematics 



Frederick D. Kellermann, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 



Margaret J. Kenney, M.S. 
Mathematics 



Rev. John H. Kinnier, S.J. 
Physics 




205 



f \ 







Pierre D. Lambert, Ph.D. 

Education 




Rev. Gerard M. Landrey, S.J. 
Chemistry 



Joseph A. Longo, A.M. 
English 



Rev. Arthur MacGillivray, S.J. 
English 




-^S$ #tw 







Rev. Leonard P. Mahoney, S.J. Joseph M. McCafferty, A.M. 

History English 




Timothy E. McCarthy, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 




Vincent A. McCrossen, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 



John F. McCarthy, A.M. 
English 



the FACULTY of 




%^^o^ 




Daniel L. McCue, Jr., A.M. 
English 



Gerald E. McDonald, D.Ed. Margaret A. McGrath, R.N., B.S. 

Education Nursing 



Francis J. McDermott, A.M. 
English 



206 






w 

IMr^v^//;//////^ , 





Rev. John P. McNamara, S.J. 
Theology 



Rev. Paul J. McManus, S.J. 
Modern Languages 



Rev. William C. Mclnnes, S.J. 
Marketing 



Rev. Albert F. McGuinn, S.J. 
Chemistry 




Lt. Col. Frank A. Merigold, 

U.S.A., A.B. 

Military Science 



Paul M. Michaud, Ph.D. 
History 



Theresa Mouid, B.S., R.N. 
Nursing 



BOSTON COLLEGE 






isjsa* 



*M 



Thomas H. O'Connor, Ph.D. 
History 



1H 





Mary R. Petkauskas, R.N., A.M. 
Nursing 



William P. Pare, Ph.D. 

Psychology 



Thomas J. Owens, Ph.D. 

Philosophy 



John J. Power, M.S. 
Physics 



Rev. Leo A. Reilly, S.J. 
Philosophy 




207 



d 



Richard Robbins, Ph.D. 
Sociology 




Rev. Thomas E. Shortell, S.J. 
Philosophy 



Major John J. Rock, U.S.A., Ph.B. 
Military Science 




Ernest A. Siciliano, Ph.D. 
Modern Languages 




Donald B. Sands, Ph.D. 
English 




"»w> f 




Rev. Leo A. Shea, S.J. 
Theology 




Clara M. Siggins, Ph.D. 
English 



Rev. George F. Smith, S.J. 
Modern Languages 



208 




Olga Stone, Mus.M. 
Education 



Frederick E. White, Ph.D. 
Physics 



fli 



Leon Vincent, M.S. 
Biology 



Harold A. Zager, M.S. 
Mathematics 





Maurice K. Walsh, M.Ed. 
Mathematics 



Frederick J. Zappala, M.B.A. 
Accounting 






m - J 




Norman J. Wells, Ph.D. 
Philosophy 




HEIGHT 



210 



From the heights of Boston College one has an unobstructed 
view of the surrounding area which the towers dominate. 

Whether this is by design or chance is of no immediate 
concern to the class of I960. Undoubtedly most would say 
such an arrangement is fortunate. For our towers and buildings 
are quick to catch the eye of passers-by; and are, indeed, 
beautiful to behold. 

Is this pride in our campus because these seniors identify 
themselves with the heights of tower and of building? It 
would seem so. 

Unquestionably this is a valid identity. Fittingly enough, 
recognition is the reward for achievement, for deeds performed 
with patience and perseverance, for heights attained. Gradua- 
tion, diplomas, — these are significant and long-awaited events 
which serve to recognize a singular accomplishment, a suc- 
cessful college career. 

Yes, the senior has reached the zenith of his temporary 
vocation in life; but there await new goals to reach, new honors 
to be won, new challenges to meet and conquer. 

Therefore, at graduation let him identify himself with the 
towers which he now knows so familiarly and which by design 
never cease to strive upwards. Then need he worry? 



,--"* 




F^ 




211 



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212 



College 

of 
Arts and Sciences 



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Senior Class Officers — Robert O'Toole, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Michael Dorney, Secretary; Charles Daley, Treas- 
urer; Bernard Plansky, Senior Representative, Campus 
Council; Robert O'Leary, President. 



213 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 






DAVID FRANCIS ALLEN 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



DONALD J. ARMSTRONG 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



OSCAR C. AUBIN, JR. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

B.S. Economics 



CHARLES JOSEPH BARBANTI 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



MICHAEL J. BARRY 

Ogdensburg, New York 
A.B. Pre-Medical 



JOHN J. BENEDETTO 

Wakefield, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 




THOMAS J. BIRMINGHAM 

Milford, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 



THOMAS P. BLOMSTROM 

Canton, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 




LAWRENCE J. BOUCHER 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



the I960 



JOHN J. BOYLE 

Natick, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 




214 




WILLIAM H. BRADY 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



CHARLES FREDERICK BROPHY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JOHN J. BRENNAN 

Canton, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 

MICHAEL A. BROWN 

Greenwich, Conn. 
B.S. Economics 




SUB TURRI 



RICHARD JOSEPH BURKE 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



EDWARD J. BYINGTON 

Fall River, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 





MiM 




I 




College of 
Arts and Sciences 



KENNETH T. BUCKLEY 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



DONALD J. BURKE 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 




m% Wimm% 

m ■!:: Jini mm m M 



A RTI 1 ( K A. BYRON, JR. 

Lexington, Mass. 

A.B. English 



KENNETH C. CAHILL 

Danvers, Mass. 
B.S. English 





ft mffiBm 



m^%. 



215 




WILLIAM GEORGE CAHILL 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 





ALLEN R. CAIL 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 



EUGENE A. CALABRO 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




dM 



MICHAEL DONALD GEORGE 
CALLAHAN 

Sharon, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



the I960 






L D. CAMPANELLA 


EARLE THOMAS CAMPBELL 


ROBERT R. CAPOBIANCO 


Milton, Mass. 


Auburndale, Mass. 


Somerville, Mass. 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. History 


B.S. Government 



JOHN M. CARR 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. History 



College of 



\ : % 



*£? 



Arts and Sciences 




WILLIAM L. CARNEY 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
A.B. History 



WILLIAM JAMES CARRABIS 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 






216 




RICHARD CARTON 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ANTHONY B. CASHMAN, JR. 

Bayonne, New Jersey 
B.S. Economics 



SUB TURRI 




GEORGE ROBERT CASSELL 

Newton, New Jersey 
B.S. History 



EUGENE J. CATALDO, JR. 

Winchester, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




A. ANTHONY CHEN 

Jamaica, West Indies 
B.S. Physics 



EUGENE STEPHEN CLASBY 

Walthara, Mass. 
A.B. English 



DAVID F. CLOONEY 

Chester, New Hampshire 
A.B. English 




WALTER F. COLANTUONO 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 



ROY ANTHONY COLELLA 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



MALCOLM COLLINS 

East Islip, Long Island, New York 
A.B. English 




College of 



Arts and Sciences 



in 







PATRICK BRENDAN COLLINS 

New Haven, Connecticut 
B.S. Physics 




JOHN GREGORY CONNOR, JR. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



FREDERICK W. COLMAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



EUGENE P. CONNORS 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 




STEPHEN F. CONCANNON 

Portland, Maine 
B.S. History a?id Government 






THOMAS MAXWELL 
CONNELLY, JR. 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



the I960 




J. PETER CONRY 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 



FRANK COPPOLA 

Lawrence, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



MAURICE B. CONWAY 

Roslindale, Mass. 
A.B. History 

JOHN V. CORCORAN, JR. 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. History 




218 




BRrAN THOMAS COUNIHAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. French 



THOMAS P. COX 

West Newton, Mass. 
B.S. English 



SUB TURRI 




MARTIN F. CURLEY, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Mathematics 



EARL J. DALTON 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 





ANDREW FRANCIS 
CURTIN, III 

Medford, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medical 

JAMES C. DALY 

Auburndale, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 




TIMOTHY H. CRONIN 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



CHARLES P. DALEY 

Gloucester, Mass. 
l.S. History and Government 



RONALD P. CURCIO 

West Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 




JOHN C DALEY 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



219 



College of 

Arts and Sciences 




ALPHONSE A. DANGELO 

Southington, Connecticut 
B.S. Modern Languages 



ALBERT F. DAVIS 

Beverly, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 



DONALD JOHN DAY 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 



JOSEPH L. DAY, JR. 

Brighton, Mass. 
A.B. History 






STEPHEN O. DEAN, JR. 

Niagara Falls, New York 
B.S. Physics 



ROBERT LEO DENNEHY 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. English 



the I960 




RICHARD V. DESROSIERS 

Greenville, New Hampshire 
A.B. Latin 




PAUL A. DESAULNIERS 

Lowell, Mass. 
A.B. Modern Language 




CARMEN ANTHONY 
DlMAGGIO 

Westford, Mass. 
A.B. Mathematics 



PETER J. DESIO 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 




220 






MARTIN J. P. DOCKERY 

White Plains, New York 
B.S. Economics 



JOHN T. DOHERTY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 






tfci 



PAUL R. DOHERTY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



THOMAS DOLAN 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



SUB TURRI 



BRIAN R. DOOLEY 

Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



MICHAEL J. DORNEY 

Milford, Connecticut 
B.S. History and Government 





JOHN R. DONELAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Sociology 



DAVID F. DONOHOE 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 




"■**W' :y ! '^^: 




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*mk 



Ikh 



PAUL J. DOWNEY 




'/ 




Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



ROBERT G. DOYLE, JR. 

Methuen, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



221 



College of 

Arts and Sciences 




RICHARD EDWARD DRISCOLL 

Rockland, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



CLARK G. DUNCAN 

Waban, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology 



JOHN R. DUNN, JR. 

Norfolk, Mass. 
B.S. English 



WALTER J. EDYVEAN 

Medford, Mass. 
A.B. English 




GEORGE T. DUNNE 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JAMES LEO EAGAN 

Allston, Mass. 
A.B. English 



JOHN J. EDDY 

Albany, New York 
A.B. History and Government 




JOHN CHARLES ENRIGHT 

Winchester, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology 




JOHN F. ERWIN, JR. 

Convent, New Jersey 
A.B. French 



the I960 



ANDREW MURPHY 
ESPOSITO, JR. 

Hamden, Connecticut 
B.S. Economics 




111 




JOSEPH E. EVERETT 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
A.B. Sociology 



JAMES P. FAGAN 

Carle Place, New York 
B.S. History and Government 



College of 
Arts and Sciences 



VINCENT P. A. FAILLA 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



WILLIAM S. FALLA 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



DAVID RAYMOND FARMER 

Amesbury, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




ROBERT J. FINN 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 





SUB TURRI 



JOSEPH M. FINNEGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 




JAMES F. FITZGERALD, JR. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




WILLIAM F. FITZGERALD 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 




COLEMAN J. FLAHERTY 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology 




223 






THOMAS FRANCIS FLYNN 

South Portland, Maine 
B.S. Physics 



WILLIAM J. FLYNN, JR. 
Rockland, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




COLEMAN J. FOLEY 

Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



GIRARD J. FORTIN 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



the I960 




RALPH RICHARD FOWLER, JR. 

Merrimac, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 



JAMES E. FRANEY 

North Abington, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 




RUSSELL J. FRAZIAN 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
A.B English 





WILLIAM H. FRIARY, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. French 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



ANGELO V. GAGLIANO 

New York, New York 
B.S. Biology 



BRENDAN JAMES GALVIN 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 




224 




THOMAS F. GALVIN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Classics 



HARRY P. GANLEY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. English 



SUB TURRI 




riufc 



CHARLES A. GIORDANO 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Government 



JOHN MICHAEL GORMAN 

Watertown, Mass. 
BS. Physics 



LAURENCE D. GLEASON 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. English 

WILLIAM T. GORMAN 

Medford; Mass. 
B.S. Modern Languages 






FRANCIS X. GARREPY 

Newton Center, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 



JAMES P. GILLIGAN 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Government 




CHARLES W. GODDARD 

South Portland, Maine 
B.S. History and Government 



BRUCE McLEAN GOLDEN 

Everett, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medical 




College of 



Arts and Sciences 



225 




MICHAEL F. GORMLEY 

Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. Physics 






ROBERT FRANCIS GREENE 

Milton, Mass. 
A.B. French 



JOSEPH JOHN GOUTHRO 

Brockton, Mass. 
A.B. English 



THOMAS F. GRIMES, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 



the I960 






h : 



PIERCE J. HALEY 


JEREMIAH F. HALLISEY 




\ m mm 


Newton Centre, Mass. 


Arlington, Mass. 




I * m 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. English 




M JH 






ROBERT RYAN HANNAN 


LAURENCE HARDIGAN 






Glens Falls, New York 


Arlington, Mass. 






B.S. History 


B.S. Economics 
ROBERT FRANCIS XAVIER 






DENNIS M. HARRINGTON 


HART 






North Quincy, Mass. 


Lowell, Mass. 






B.S. Biology 


A.B. Sociology 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 




226 






GEORGE R. HARVEY 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



GERARD JOSEPH HAYES 

Brookline, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 



SUB TURRI 




THOMAS F. HERLIHY 

Cambridge, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medical 



PETER D. HICKEY 

Great Barrington, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



HANS J. HERMANS 

Curasao, N. W. I. 

B.S. Chemistry 



EDWARD R. HUGHES, JR. 

Cumberland, "Rhode Island 
A.B. History 





/v- 





fc iifc 



DANIEL J. HEAFEY, JR. 

South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



ALBERT F. HEALEY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 







m 




JOHN CHARLES HERZOG 

Winchester, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government 



JOHN D. HICKEY 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



in 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 





EDWARD A. HUTCHINSON, III 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medkal 



*k 



RUSSELL HENRY 
HUTCHINSON 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History 



THOMAS A. HUTCHINSON, JR. 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Government 



ALBERT L. HYLAND, JR. 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 





JAMES FRANCIS KEANEY 

South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



MICHAEL JOHN KEARNEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 





PAUL F. JUDGE 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



ROBERT A. KEATING 

Brighton, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 




<s^ *c 








J. VINCENT KANE, JR. 
Westfield, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



the I960 



JOHN P. KEEGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 





228 




EDWARD P. KELLEHER, JR. 

Braintree, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 




1 



JAMES J. KELLEHER 

Hudson, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



MICHAEL JOSEPH KELLEY 

Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government 



B.S. Chemistry 



SUB TURRI 



ROBERT S. LABOUNTY 

Fall River, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology 



RONALD J. LAMB 

W. Medford, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 





THOMAS ALBERT KEOUGH 

Millis, Mass. 
S. History 







tiii* 



CHARLES A. LANE 

Portland, Maine 
A.B. English 



PHILIP KEVIN LANGAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. English 



229 



College of 





Arts and Sciences 



LEONARD PAUL LECLERC 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




JEFFREY A. LINEHAN 

Meriden, Connecticut 

B.S. Economics 



PETER K. LENTINI 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




GEORGE I. LITMAN 

Chelsea, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 




DAVID C. LANGZETTEL 

South Portland, Maine 
B.S. English 



FRANCIS T. LEONARD 

New Rochelle, New York 
B.S. History and Government 





ROBERT E. LOONEY 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 





ANDRE J. LeBLANC 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 

JAMES LIANOS 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 



mm 




the I960 



JOSEPH B. LUKAS, JR. 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




i tk 



230 




RICHARD GUY LUONGO 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 

THOMAS A. MacLEAN 

Lowell, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 





* \ 




JOHN J. LYNCH 

Fitchburg, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



WILLIAM H. MAHER 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



WALTER J. MAHONEY 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JAMES C MALGER 

Cochituate, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




SUB TURRI 



RICHARD D. MALONEY 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




RAYMOND T. MANCINI 

Cranston, khode Island 
B.S. Economics 





FRANCIS P. MANNING 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



JAMES M. MANNING 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry 



231 



jppl^plk 





PETER J. MANNING 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



lit 



JOHN ROBERT MARCACCIO 

Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Biology 



ROBERT G. MARCOTULLIO 

Pelham, New York 
B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH S. MAROUN 

Methuen, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



the I960 






JAMES F. MARTIN, JR. 


LOUIS PAUL MASSARO, JR. 


JOHN LAWRENCE MATTHEWS 


THOMAS J. MAY 


Brighton, Mass. 


Woburn, Mass. 


W. Newton, Mass. 


Brookline, Mass. 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. History and Government 


A.B. Philosophy 


B.S. Psychology 
MONTROSE PALLEN 






MICHAEL S. MAZVA 


McARDLE, IV 






Chicago, Illinois 


Bedford, Mass. 






B.S. English 


B.S. Economics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 





in 




ronald p. McCaffrey 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medkal 



henry w. McCarthy 

Needham, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medkal 



SUB TURRI 




THOMAS J. McCARVILLE 

West Newbury, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



THOMAS GAMES DOMONIC 
McCUE 

East Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. History and Government 





ANDREW KENT McCUSKER 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. English 

FREDERICK W. McGARRAH 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JAMES P. McDEVITT 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 

RICHARD A. McKENNA 
West Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 



JOHN FRANCIS MCDONALD 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 






DON PATRICK McDONOUGH 

Chelsea, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 





College of 



Arts and Sciences 



233 




ALLAN T. McLEAN 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT ARTHUR McKENNEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
A.B. History 



john s. Mclaughlin 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 




JAMES JUDE McMANN 

South Boston, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government 



the I960 






JOHN J. McMANUS 
Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Physics 




FREDERICK V. 
McMENIMEN, JR. 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



JOHN R. McNEALY 

Revere, Mass. 
A.B. Modern Language 

HENRY L. McQUEENEY, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medical 



DANIEL J. McPHEE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government 



KEVIN L. McTEAGUE 

Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



College of 





Arts and Sciences 







234 





WILLIAM F. MICHAUD 

Wakefield, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ANTHONY JOSEPH MILANO 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. History 




SUB TURRI 



JOHN F. MILLER, JR. 

Salem, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 



PHILIP A. MINICHIELLO 

Wakefield, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science 










^^^V^JH B^k 


m mm 


FRANCIS MORETTI 


JOSEPH L. MORGAN 




m 1 


Medford, Mass. 


Maiden, Mass. 




Mil 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Biology 


BRIAN J. MORAN 


MICHAEL FRANCIS MORELLI 






Needham Heights, Mass. 


Maiden, Mass. 






A.B. Economics 


B.S. Economics 






PIERRE J. MORIN 


ROBERT M. MORONEY 






Berlin, New Hampshire 


Dorchester, Mass. 






A.B. History and Government 


A.B. English 








College of 



Arts and Sciences 



235 



College of 




Arts and Sciences 



STEPHEN GERALD 
MORRISON, JR. 

Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. Mathematics 




ROBERT JOSEPH MORRISSEY 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



PHILIP E. MULLANE 

Lowell, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



KEVIN THOMAS MULLEN 

Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Modem Language 





PAUL EDWARD MUNSEY 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History 





RICHARD HARLEY MURCH 

Roslindale, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 



the I960 



RICHARD F. MURPHY 

Newtonville, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT EDWARD MURPHY 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology 




BARRY JOSEPH MURPHY 

Belmont, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 



236 




dktM 



JOSEPH A. MURRAY, JR. 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



JOSEPH E. NADEAU 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 




PAUL LAWRENCE NEARY 

Roslindale, Mass. 
A.B. Pre-Medical 



ROBERT NICHOLS 

Florence, South Carolina 
B.S. Physics 



SUB TURRI 



MICHAEL J. O'CONNOR 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
B.S. English 



ROBERT C. O'LEARY 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 






JOHN DEBAISIEUX NICKROSZ KEVIN FRANCIS O'BRIEN 

Lowell, Mass. Somerville, Mass. 

A.B. Latin and French B.S. Biology 







CHARLES J. O'MALLEY 

West Newton, Mass. 
A.B. English 



FREDERICK M. O'NEILL 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



237 



College of 

Arts and Sciences 








WILLIAM D. O'REILLY 


ROBERT F. O'TOOLE 






Roxbury, Mass. 


Dorchester, Mass. 






BS. Phytics 


BS. Economics 


TIMOTHY FRANCIS PARSONS 


PAUL H. PAYSON 


STANFORD S. PELOSI, JR. 


DOMINIC F. PERRIELLO 


Cambridge, Mass. 


Wollaston, Mass. 


Saugus, Mass. 


Medford, Mass. 


BS. Chemistry 


BS. Physics 


BS. Chemistry 


BS. History 




CHARLES E. PETRIE 

Dedham, Mass. 
BS. Economics 



HAI BA PHO 

Waltham, Mass. 
>S. History and Government 




BERNARD LEO PLANSKY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
BS. Physics 




the I960 



ZYGMUNT W. POCZATEK 

New Bedford, Mass. 
BS. Physics 





238 




F. PAUL QUATROMONI 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Sciences 



JOSEPH V. RAJUNAS 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry 



life 



EDWARD J. QUINN 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. History 

FREDERICK L. RANDALL 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Sciences 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



ROBERT H. REAGAN 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. History 



JAMES A. REILLY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 




SUB TURRI 



SALVATORE T. REINA 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



JOSEPH N. RESHA 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Sciences 





iik fife 



PAUL ALVIN RICCI 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



THOMAS J. RIDDELL 

Manchester, Conn. 
B.S. Sociology 



239 






RICHARD F. RILEY 

Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Sociology 




ROBERT H. RIORDON 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




RAYMOND N. RIOUX 

Falmouth, Mass. 
B.S. 



WILLIAM L. RIVERS 

Salem, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



the I960 




WILLIAM W. ROBERTS 

Clifton, New Jersey 
B.S. Biology 




ROBERT M. ROBICHEAU 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



BURTON ROBINSON 

Newton Centre, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Sciences 




WILLIAM CHARLES ROGERS 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



WILLIAM P. ROHAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology 



JAMES M. ROMERO 
Attleboro, Mass. 

B.S. Biology 




240 






JAMES W. SAVAGE 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. English 



WALTER E. SHAUGHNESSY 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



SUB TURRI 



i7A4* 



LOUIS E. SHAW 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH L. SHEA 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 






LEO BRIAN SHEA 

Melrose, Mass. 
A.B. English 

JOHN FRANCIS SHEEHAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. English 



RALPH A. SHEA 

Brookline, Mass. 
A.B. Sociology 

THOMAS D. STANGA 

Boston, Mass. 
A.B. Psychology 



WALTER H. SHEA 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. History 



PAUL JOSEPH SHEEDY 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 





College of 



Arts and Sciences 



241 




EDWARD F. STANTON, JR. 
Attleboro, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




CORNELIUS FRANCIS 
SULLIVAN, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
A3. Pre-Medical 



ROBERT S. STROKES 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



PHILIP H. SULLIVAN 
Braintree, Mass. 
A3. Economics 




PHILIP M. SUAREZ 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. History 




DANIEL SWEENEY 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



EDWARD F. SULESKY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



the I960 




RICHARD D. SWEENEY 

Whitman, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ANTHONY J. TESTA 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



JOHN J. THEALL 

Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 




242 




EDMUND CORNELIUS 
TOOMEY 

South Boston, Mass. 
\.B. Economics 



SUB TURRI 





JOSEPH L. TRIBBLE 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. English 

ROBERT J. VILLIARD 

Woonsocket, Rhode Island 
A.B. Pre-Medical 



JOHN FRANCIS TWEEDIE 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 

RUDOLPH VON BURG 

Manhasset, New York 
B.S. Biology 








FRANCIS E. TORPEY 

Boston, Mass. 
A.B. Mathematics 



MICHAEL R. TRAMONTE 

Medford, Mass. 
A.B. Sociology 




LOUIS PAUL VERDE 

Eastchester Tuckahoe, New York 
B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH G. M. VIDOLI 
Maumee, Ohio 
A.B. History 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



243 



College of 

Arts and Sciences 




JOHN A. WALGREEN 

Braintree, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH J. WALKER, JR. 

Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan 
B.S. Economics 



PAUL R. WALKER 

Biddeford, Maine 
B.S. English 



RICHARD D. WALLACE 

Milford, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 





JAMES P. WALSH, JR. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 




MICHAEL F. WALSH 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



the I960 




JAMES E. WARD 


MOSES PAUL WARD 


Watertown, Mass. 


Boston, Mass. 


B.S. English 


A.B. Psychology 



DONALD JAMES WATT 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. English 



DAVID A. WHITE 

Rochester, New York 
B.S. Economics 




244 




LOUIS J. WHITE 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



FREDERICK C. WILLIAMS 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Fhysics 



College of 
Arts and Sciences 




ROBERT L. WINSTON 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



EDWARD A. 
WLODARCZYK, JR. 

Chicago, Illinois 
B.S. Economics 



SUB TURRI 





WALTER E. WOLKOWICH 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



DAVID H. WRING 

Three Rivers, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology 



CHARLES MATTHEW WUJCIK 

Waterbury, Connecticut 
B.S. Natural Sciences 



ROBERT P. YOCCO 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 








\ 



RICHARD C. ZILINSKI 

Woodside, New York 
B.S. Economics 




EDWARD J. ZILONIS 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Modern Languages 



245 



School 

of 
Education 



Senior Class Officers — Maureen Keohane, Treas- 
urer; Edith Cackowski, Vice-President; James Russell, 
President; Brenda Crowley, Secretary. 






GERALDYNE M. AMORE 

Marshfield, Mass. 
B.S. French 



the I960 
SUB TURRI 



KATHLEEN M. BAILEY 

Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 



JEAN M. BELVAL 

Norwich, Mass. 

B.S. History 



PATRICIA A. BERRY 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



PAMELA R. BERNARDINI 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 



ROSEMARY BEAGAN 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. English 




MARYANN BERTOLAMI 

Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education 



ELIZABETH M. BOOTH 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



ANDREA BOYADGIS 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 




School of 



Education 



247 



School of 
Education 




LOUISE B. BOYLE 

Salem, Mass. 
IS. Elementary Education 



MARY P. BROWN 

Maiden, Mass. 
BS. English 



MARY-ELLIN BROWNE 

Woodmere, New York 
BS. Elementary Education 




PETER PAUL BUDRYK 

Medford, Mass. 
BS. English 



MARY F. BYRNE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
IS. Elementary Education 



PAUL E. BYRON 

Whitman, Mass. 
BS. History 




EDITH CACKOWSKI 

Stamford, Connecticut 
BS. French 



PATRICIA A. CARTY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
BS. Mathematics 




ROBERT W. CLARKE 

East Weymouth, Mass. 
BS. English 



the I960 



JANET A. COLEMAN 

Maiden, Mass. 
BS. Mathematics 




248 




School of 
Education 



FAITH ANNE CORCORAN 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 

MARY E. CROWLEY 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



BRENDA M. CROWLEY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. English 

MARY M. CYR 

Newtonville, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



DOROTHY DAGOSTINO 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MAURICE JOSEPH DALY 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. English 




SUB TURRI 



MARY ELAINE DEFINA 

Needham, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 



RAMON de ROSAS 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. English 



ROSANNA F. DAWSON 

Portland, Maine 
B.S. Elementary Education 



BETTY ANN DEAN 

Salisburg, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 






±AA 



t 




249 




ELEANOR C. DOWNEY 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



MARGARET A. DOYLE 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



JAMES F. DUFFY 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. History 



the I960 




PRISCILLA A. DURANT 

E. Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 



ELAINE F. DUTILLY 

Natick, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



LORRAINE A. ESTERHILL 

Winchester, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 



PHILIP J. FASANO 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. French 



School of 



Education 



MAUREEN C. FOLEY 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government 



DOLORES A. FRANGIOSO 

Mattapan, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 




250 




CARROLL P. GAGNON 

Brockton, Mass. 
B.S. History 



SUB TURRI 



M. ELLEN GARTLAND 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



CAROL FRANCES GREEN 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JOHN M. HALLORAN 

South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. English 

ANN HILFERTY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. English 



WILLIAM LEONARD 
HAMMOND 

Marblehead, Mass. 
B.S. Social Studies 

MARGARET E. HINCHEY 

Rutland, Vermont 
B.S. Elementary Education 




JOSEPH FRANCIS 
HARRINGTON, JR. 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. History 





PHILIP J. HIGGINS 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



School of 



Education 



251 




MARY HINES 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. English 



PHYLLIS A. JOY 

Watertown, Mass. 
S. History and Government 



PAUL J. HUDON 

Lowell, Mass. 
B.S. History 




PAUL FRANCIS KEAVENEY 
Brookline, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 



the I960 



v » 



EDMUND P. G. KELLEY 


BRENDA M. KELLY 






Portland, Maine 


Winthrop, Mass. 






B.S. History and Government 


B.S. Biology 










MAUREEN ANNE KEOHANE 


MARGARET EILEEN KUHN 






Arlington, Mass. 


Arlington, Mass. 






B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Business Education 






JOAN FRANCES LAWRIE 


PAULINE Y. LeBLANC 






Revere, Mass. 


Arlington, Mass. 






B.S. Business Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 



School of 



Education 







252 




ROBERT J. LEONARD 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



PAUL FREDERICK 
MacARTHUR 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. History 



SUB TURRI 



DONNA VIRGINIA 
MacCHARLES 

Peabody, Mass. 
B.S. English 



MYRNA LOUISE MacFARLANE 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 




MARIA M. MALGER 

Cochituate, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



DONNA E. MASON 

Arlington, Mass. 
.S. Elementary Education 



EDWARD JOSEPH MCCARTHY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History 



HELEN ANN MARIANO 
Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



LYDIA MARY MCCARTHY 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



RUTH E. MCCARTHY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 




School of 



Education 



253 



School of 



Education 




FRANCIS F. McCUNE 

Rockport, Mass. 
B.S. History 



ROSE MARY McDERMOTT 

Randolph, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



GRACE KATHLEEN 
McGILLIVRAY 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



FLORA MARIE MCLAUGHLIN 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 





FREDERICK J. MILTON 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. History 




JEAN T. MOLLOY 

Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education 



the I960 




BRUCE W. MORSE 

Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. History 



KAREN ANN MOYNIHAN 

East Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. Biology 



DAVID A. NICHOLSON 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 





NORTON C. O'BRIEN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History 



I 




254 




M. NANCY O'CONNELL 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



WILLIAM O'CONNOR 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. History 



School of 
Education 



JAMES L. O'HEARN 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. History 



HELEN T. O'MALLEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



SUB TURRI 



ROBERT P. O'REGAN 

Natick, Mass. 
S. History 



EILEEN MARIE O'SULLIVAN 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire 
IS. History 




SR. M. THOMAS PAUL 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



CLAIRE BEDRANTI 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 





ANTHONY NICHOLAS PENNA 

Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. History 




MARIE PLUNKETT 

Boston, Mass. 
I.S. Elementary Education 



255 



School of 
Education 




ANNA J. RECUPERO 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History 



JOYCE REGIONE 

Everett, Mass. 
J.S. Elementary Education 



MARY A. QUINLAN 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 

FREDERICK MEADE 
REYNOLDS 

No. Chelmsford, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



MARY C. QUINN 

South Boston, Mass. 
>S. Elementary Education 

SUSAN RIZZO 

Medford, Mass. 

>.S. Elementary Education 




CHARLES A. ROBINSON 

Dartmouth, Mass. 
B.S. English 



DORIS M. ROBINSON 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics 



the I960 



JAMES W. RUSSELL 

Danvers, Mass. 

B.S. English 




256 




RITA SARRO 

Mansfield, Mass. 
i.S. Elementary Education 

JANE ANNE SHEA 

Arlington, Mass. 

IS. Elementary Education 



School of 
Education 



PATRICIA MARY SASSO 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. English 



BARBARA SILVERMAN 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



DONNA L. SKEHAN 

East Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. Elementary Education 



PATRICIA MARIE 

STANKUNAS 

Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry 




SUB TURRI 



SALLY ANN STEARNS 

Hyannis, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



ROSEMARY SULLIVAN 

Waterbury, Connecticut 
B.S. History 




JOHN P. THOMPSON 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History 




PAUL FRANCIS TIGHE 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. History 



\ 



257 




A 




JOAN A. TUBEROSA 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



GREGG A. VOCI 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
B.S. Business Education 



ALICE C. WADDEN 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MARYFRANCIS G. WHITE 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Classics 



School of 



Education 



the I960 
SUB TURRI 




ROSEMARY WOODS 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry 




"ill 

lllr 



258 





Senior Class Officers — William Sullivan, Vice- 
President; Joseph Carty, President; Gerald Butter- 
worth, Treasurer; Thomas Monahan, Secretary 
(absent) . 



College 

of 
Business Administration 



f 






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College of 

Business 
Administration 




RANDALL J. ASTOLFI 

Beverly, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



CHARLES T. AYLWARD 

Medfield, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ANTHONY J. ABRAHAM 

Fall River, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

HARRISON BALL, JR. 

Beverly, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN DURHAM ARMSTRONG 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



GENNARO A. BARBIERI 

Milford, Connecticut 
B.S. Accounting 





ilfeft*ll 




JAMES G. BARON 

Lynn, Mass. 
IS. Industrial Management 



JOHN F. BARRETT 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




I 




L* 



ROBERT W. BARRETT 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



the I960 



DAVID NOEL BARRY 

Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. Distribution Management 









260 




JOSEPH T. BARRY 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 

JOHN P. BENCH 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES RAYMOND 
BEAUCHAMP 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 

RICHARD N. BENIXEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



College of 

Business 
Administration 



DAVID P. BERNARD 

Manchester, New Hampshire 
B.S. Accounting 



ALBERT JOSEPH BERNAZANI 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 







SUB TURRI 



ROBERT W. BERRY 

Hopedale, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



FREDERIC C. BERTRAM 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



RONALD J. BONNER 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




PIERRE A. BOULANGER 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 





261 




DAVID F. BOWEN 

Attleboro, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



I960 



LEO J. BOURQUE 

Rockland, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD E. BOURQUE 

South Lynnfield, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 





RICHARD W. BROSNAHAN 

Newtonville, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



ARTHUR R. BROWN 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JAMES R. BROWNE 

North Quincy, Mass. 
\.S. Distribution Management 

JOHN N. BURKE 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



GERALD J. BUCKLEY 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS FRANCIS BURKE 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



College of 



Business 
Administration 





4iMkk 



262 






TIMOTHY J. BURNS 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



WILLIAM L. BURNS 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



SUB TURRI 




GERALD E. BUTTERWORTH 

Auburndale, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM J. CALLAGHAN 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




JOHN T. CALLAHAN 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JAMES FRANCIS CARR, JR. 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT CAMMISA 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

JAMES L. "CARROLL 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



DANIEL J. CAMPBELL 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



JOSEPH M. CAREY 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 





College of 



mMWA 



Business 
Administration 



263 






ROBERT A. CARROLL 

Salisbury, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




ROBERT L. CAWLEY 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOSEPH R. CARTY 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL J. CELATA 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



College of 



Business 
Administration 




THOMAS E. CASEY 

Brighton, Mass. 
'•.S. Distribution Management 



JOSEPH G. CASS 

Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
S.5. Industrial Management 



the I960 




KENNETH JAMES CENCINI 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

ANTHONY M. CIULLA 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



GEORGE C. CHINETTI 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

THOMAS E. COLLIGAN 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




AJtf 




264 




ROBERT JAMES COLLINS 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



EDWARD FRANCIS COLOMEY 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




SUB TURRI 




STEPHEN J. CONNERS 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM S. COTTER 

Peabody, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



B 



JAMES F. CONNOLLY 

Nantasket, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

RICHARD A. COUTURE 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




lAlLl 



JOHN JOSEPH CONNELL 

South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT A. CONNELLY 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 





I \ 



MATTHEW THOMAS 
CONNOLLY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



PHILIP G. CORBETT 

Stoneham, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



College of 



Business 
Administration 



265 



College of 



Business 
Administration 




STEPHEN COYNE 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



DANIEL F. CRIMMINS 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



DONALD CORATTI 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



JOHN J. CROWLEY, JR 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



THOMAS J. CUMMINGS 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



the I960 





THOMAS J. CUNNALLY 

Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JAMES A. CUNNIFF 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Finance 



PAUL J. CUNNINGHAM 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANCIS E. CURRIE 

Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




266 




College of 

Business 
Administration 



JOHN F. CUSACK 

Arlington, Mass. 
IS. Distribution Management 



WILLIAM JOSEPH DAILEY, JR. 

Lexington, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




TIMOTHY B. DALY 

Wellesley, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



PETER R. D'ANGELO 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



SUB TURRI 



RONALD G. DAVIS 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD L. DARR 

North Quincy, Mass. 
\.S. Distribution Management 






H. JEFFREY DAVIS 

Manhasset, Long Island, New York 
B.S. General Business 




PAUL F. DEADY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 





2tf*&^ '^^% i : ; 




: J 38* : *r^ 



tiili 



DONALD T. DEGRANDIS 

South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



CHARLES R. DELLA CROCE 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



267 



College of 

Business 
Administration 




JOSEPH DERFEL 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



PHILIP A. DERY 

Newtonville, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



STEPHEN A. De NAPOLI 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 

JOSEPH A. DIMARINO 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL P. DERBY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

EDWARD PATRICK DOHERTY 

Lenox, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




MJ 



EDWARD T. DOHERTY 

Fall River, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 





■a****^' '•■"**< 



PHILLIP J. DOHERTY 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ll ^ tk 



the I960 





PAUL A. DONLAN 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT F. DONNELLY 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



litf 









268 



■ 








College of 



Business 
Administration 



JOHN F. DONOGHUE 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



JOHN J. DONOVAN 

Wethersfield, Connecticut 
B.S. Finance 



EDWARD T. DONOHOE 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

WILLIAM J. DONOVAN, JR. 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM T. DONOVAN 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



WALTER F. DOWNING 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 







ivtifc 




SUB TURRI 



JOHN J. DRUMMEY, JR. 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM THOMAS DUANE 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



BRUCE E. DRISCOLL 

Lee, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



JAMES J. DRISCOLL 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 





269 




DONALD E. DUFFY 

Somerville, Mass. 
'•S. Distribution Management 




^ ii 



DONALD FRANCIS DUFFY 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




ALVIN E. EDMUNDS, JR. 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM FRANCIS ELBERY 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



the I960 




JOHN C. FAHERTY, JR. 

Milton 87, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN J. FALVEY 

West Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



DOUGLAS A. FARRELL 

Auburndale, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 

JOSEPH F. FENNELLY 

Somervilfe; Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



ROY JOSEPH FEDERER 

Spring Cliff, N. Y. 
B.S. Finance 



GERALD R. FERRERA 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



College of 



Business 
Administration 




270 






JOHN A. FERRIS, JR. 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 





PAUL M. FINNEGAN 

Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management 



SUB TURRI 




HENRY V. FINNERAN 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN JOSEPH FINNERTY 

Lexington, Mass. 

B.S. Finance 




HERBERT D. FITZGERALD 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

JOHN J. FLAHERTY 

Mattapan, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM V. FITZPATRICK 

Larchmont, New York 
B.S. Industrial Management 

LAWRENCE M. FLAVIN 

Quincy.'Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




ALFRED E. FLAHERTY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




CHARLES F. FLAHERTY 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



College of 



Business 
Administration 



in 




MICHAEL KEVIN FOLAN 

Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Finance 




MICHAEL F. GAVIN 

Canton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN MICHAEL FRANCO 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



FRANK W. FOLEY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




JOSEPH B. GANNON, JR. 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS J. GALLAGHER, JR. 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



the I960 




DANIEL GENDRON 

Lanford, Maine 
B.S. General Business 

THOMAS JOSEPH 
GILLIGAN, JR. 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 





BRIAN M. GILLIGAN 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

RICHARD MICHAEL 
GIULIANO 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



College of 



Business 
Administration 




in 




BERNARD W. GLEASON, JR. 

Med ford, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



JOHN C. GOUZOULES 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



SUB TURRI 




U,X 



THOMAS R. GRECO 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



RALPH W. GRIDLEY 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM J. GORMLEY 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
3.S. Distribution Management 



ERNEST J. GULLA 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



WILLIAM E. GOZZI 

Guilford, Connecticut 
LS. Distribution Management 




PETER B. HANSON 

Hingham, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management 



JOHN J. HARNEY 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL C. HAWLEY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




College of 



Business 
Administration 



in 



College of 



Business 
Administration 






CHARLES W. HAYES 


JAMES JOHN HAYES 


Arlington, Mass. 


Boston, Mass. 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Finance 



JOHN N. HEALY 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



JAMES J. HESSION 

Woburn, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



RODERICK C. HEATH 

Oakland, New Jersey 
i.S. Distribution Management 




EDWARD V. HICKEY, JR. 

Scituate, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



VINCENT J. HOGAN, JR. 

Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



MARTIN J. HEGARTY 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



the I960 



JAMES H. HOYE 

Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management 




274 





iiMi 



College of 



lli 


kilt 


Business 


■UK 


■^w 


Administration 


EDWARD C. HUFF 

Winter Haven, Florida 
B.S. General Business 


PAUL M. HUGHES 

Holbrook, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 





WILLIAM V. HYLAND 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



RONALD W. JAGIELLO 

Adams, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




MURTAGH M. HUNT 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL D. HURLEY 

Jersey City, New Jersey 
B.S. Industrial Management 



SUB TURRI 



N. PETER JOHNSON 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Economics 



STEPHEN L. JONES 

Wenham, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 








FRANCIS PATRICK KEANEY 

Portland, Maine 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS MICHAEL KEANEY 

Portland, Maine 

B.S. Finance 



275 



College of 

Business 
Administration 




EDWARD J. KEEGAN, JR. 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN J. KELLEHER, III 

Savannah, Georgia 
B.S. Distribution Management 



GERALD V. KELLEY, JR. 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



OLIVER G. KELLEY 

Winchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




ROBERT J. KELLEY 

North Attleboro, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




WILLIAM FRANCIS KELLEY 

Chelmsford, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 





JAMES N. KEPPLE 

Fall River, Mass. 

'.S. Distribution Management 





ROBERT H. KERESEY 

Gardner, Mass. 

i.S. Distribution Management 




JAMES V. KERRIGAN 

Medford, Mass. 



the I960 



JOHN J. KILKELLY 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 





276 




RICHARD D. KING 

Winsted, Connecticut 
>.S. Distribution Management 



ROBERT G. KLIM 

Stoughton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



College of 

Business 
Administration 



ANTHONY J. KOENIG 

Kingston, New York 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN C. KRASKOUSKAS 

Gardner, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL D. KRZEWICK 

Newton Center, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




ANTHONY F. LACAMERA 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




SUB TURRI 



FREDERICK J. LAIDLAW, JR. 

Winthrop, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN L. LAMBERT 

Hampstead, New York 
B.S. Finance 




JOSEPH J. LARAIA 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ANTHONY JOSEPH LA ROSA 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




111 




1960 



FRANK LAVEY 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



C\ 



WILLIAM J. LEADER 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 






MARTIN R. LEE 


WILLIAM J. LEEN 


HUGH LENNON, II 


Somerville, Mass. 


Dorchester, Mass. 


Canajoharie, New York 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Distribution Management 



CORNELIUS F. LEWIS, JR. 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



EDWARD M. LEVITT 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



EDWARD J. LOCKE 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



College of 



Business 
Administration 





<*"~_ 






278 





1ARD D. LONG 


JOHN F. LYDON 


Avon, Mass. 


Norwood, Mass. 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 



SUB TURRI 




JAMES D. LYNCH 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



PAUL J. LYNCH 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




RICHARD JAMES LYNCH 

East Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




JOHN D. LYONS 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




PAUL V. LYONS 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



JOHN NEIL MacPHERSON 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



THOMAS W. MAGUIRE 

West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 





ROBERT PAUL MAHONEY 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




College of 



Business 
Administration 



279 






mm 

mid 




STEPHAN A. MAHONEY 
Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN E. MALONEY, JR. 

Brookline, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




LEONARD W. MARMA 

New York, New York 
B.S. Distribution Management 



DONALD R. MARSDEN 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



College of 



Business 
Administration 



4iifcJ 



FRANCIS X. MANNING, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



PIERRE A. MARCEAU 

Amesbury, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



the I960 






NICHOLAS DANIEL 
MASTRONARDI 

Long Beach, New York 
B.S. General Business 

HENRY L. McAULIFFE, JR. 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



LAWRENCE P. MATTHEWS 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN F. McAULIFFE, JR. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Economics 




280 






V 



&x 



JOHN T. McAULIFFE 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
i.S. Distribution Management 



WILLIAM McCABE 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



SUB TURRI 




DONALD CHARLES 
McGONAGLE 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 

paul c. Mclaughlin 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN P. McGONIGLE 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 

DONALD J. McLELLAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 





mM Aft 





^ttWi At^ 



JOHN F. McCAULEY 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



Robert j. Mcdonald 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




' <* " ' -V-- 




RAYMOND P. McGUIGGIN 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



JAMES L. McGUINNESS, JR. 

Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting 



College of 



Business 
Administration 



281 



College of 



Business 
Administration 





A* Jm ^ri £& 



JOHN B. McNAMARA 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT F. McQUIGGAN 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



WILLIAM CHESTER MELIA 

Weston, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



ARTHUR R. MICHAUD 

Salem, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 







BARRY P. MITCHEL 

New Rochelle, New York 
IS. Distribution Management 




WILLIAM JUSTIN MOONEY 

Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. General Business 



DONALD MITCHELL 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



the I960 



OLIVA A. MORNEAU 

Berlin, New Hampshire 
B.S. Accounting 



ROBERT M. MONAHAN 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



THOMAS L. MONAHAN, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management 




282 




CHARLES T. MORRISON 

West Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




mm 



CHRISTOPHER COAKLEY 
MORTON 

Mentor, Ohio 
B.S. General Business 



College of 



Business 
Administration 




FRANK P. MUCKIAN 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



JOHN F. MULLEN, JR. 

Stoneham, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



SUB TURRI 



GARRY G. NEAL 

Natick, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



JOSEPH F. NEAL, JR. 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




DANIEL I. MURPHY, JR. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 






HUGH F. MURRAY, JR. 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 







\ " ■«■ 




RICHARD J. NEE 

South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES JOSEPH NORTON 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



283 



College of 

Business 
Administration 




JAMES MICHAEL NORTON 

Milford, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



ROBERT KIMBERLEY NOVAK 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



FRANCIS C. OATWAY 

Devonshire, Bermuda 
B.S. Accounting 



JOEL T. O'BRIEN 

Medford, Mass. 
IS. Industrial Management 



THOMAS F. O'BRIEN 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




THOMAS L. O'CONNELL 

Uxbridge, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




KEVIN A. O'DONNELL 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




RICHARD J. OGDEN 
Reading, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 







the I960 



ROSS O'HANLEY 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




284 




College of 



Business 
Administration 



THOMAS O'HARE 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 

EDWARD TERENCE O'LEARY 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES J. O'KEEFE 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



WALTER H. O'LEARY 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN ANTHONY OLSZEWSKI 

Saugus, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



KEVIN O'NEIL 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 





ri J 4 




SUB TURRI 



DONALD W. PALMER 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



SAMUEL A. PANELLA 

Thompsonville, Connecticut 
B.S. Industrial Management 



ROBERT C. O'NEILL 

West Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




JOHN R. OROURKE 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 





285 






ROBERT A. PATTERSON 

New Britain, Connecticut 
B.S. Economics 





JOSEPH F. PERACHI, JR. 

Lexington, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




V, 



DAVID L. PERGOLA 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




WILLIAM J. PERRON, JR. 

Holyoke, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



the I960 






ILIP E. PETERS, JR. 


ROBERT SEBASTION 


ALPHONSE P. PETROSINO 


FRANK H. PETTEE 


Dorchester, Mass. 


PETKEWICH 


Revere, Mass. 


Avon, Mass. 


B.S. Accounting 


Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Economics 






EDWARD M. PHELAN 


RICHARD J. PIERCE 






Quincy, Mass. 


Belmont, Mass. 






B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Finance 



College of 



Business 
Administration 




286 




EDWARD J. POLLIS 

Dorchester, Mass. 
l.iS. Distribution Management 



EDWARD J. POWERS, JR. 

Auburndale, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



SUB TURRI 




\ Jl 



ROBERT M. PUOPOLO 

Lexington, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




ROBERT J. PYNE 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




THOMAS F. QUINN, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



JOSEPH E. RABBITT 

Mattapan, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




FREDERICK C. RATTIGAN, JR. THOMAS JOHN RATTIGAN 

Watertown, Mass. Willimansett, Mass. 

B.S. Finance B.S. Finance 



WILFRED W. RAYMOND, JR. 

Caribou, Maine 
B.S. General Business 



JOHN E. REAGAN, JR. 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 
B.S. Industrial Management 




College of 



Business 
Administration 



287 




DONALD ANTHONY REGAN 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



^^^^\ 




mi 4km JR.-- M X \ - 

DAVID W. ROCHON 

Barrington, Rhode Island 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES PETER REGAN 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




THOMAS R. ROCK 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



PAUL J. RIGAZIO 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 





PETER F. ROUGHAN 

Somerville, Mass. 
i.S. Distribution Management 







NORMAN B. RINEHART 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



the I960 




REAL O. ROY 

Rumford, Maine 
B.S. Finance 



College of 



Business 
Administration 



ROBERT H. RUDMAN 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



JAMES J. RUSH 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 




288 




DAVID M. RUSSO 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



SUB TURRI 



JOSEPH A. SCALI 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 

THOMAS F. SHARKEY 

Braintree, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



RALPH J. SCALLY, JR. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 

ROBERT C. SHEA 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



LAWRENCE D. RYAN 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



JOHN RICHARD SCABIA 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 






gAiiM 



JOHN J. SCHOPPMEYER 

Plainville, Long Island, New York 
B.S. Distribution Management 



CHARLES R. SEYMOUR 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 
B.S. Economics 




College of 



Business 
Administration 



289 



College of 

Business 
Administration 




JOHN P. SHEEHAN, JR. 

Needham, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



PETER J. SHEEHAN 

Brockton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



ANTHONY J. SIGNORELLO 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 







JOHN F. SOLAN, JR. 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANCIS J. SIMON, JR. 

East Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 





LEO BRENDAN SPENCER 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



EDWARD CHRISTOPHER 
SMITH 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S'. Distribution Management 



GERARD H. SPENDLEY 

Holbrook, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



"ft 






'-*""" ! <tss» ^ 




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KENNETH E. SNYDER 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



the I960 



RICHARD J. STANTON 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 




290 




"J** 




iMmM 



College of 



JOSEPH C. STEINKRAUSS 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



DANIEL FRANCIS SUGHRUE 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



Business 
Administration 




EDWARD M. SULLIVAN 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



EDWARD ROBERT SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



SUB TURRI 



JAMES EDWARD SULLIVAN 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JAMES J. SULLIVAN 
Mattapan, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




FRANK SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



GERALD P. SULLIVAN 

Brighton, Mass. 
I.S. Distribution Management 





PAUL J. SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



STEPHEN V. SULLIVAN 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 



291 



College of 

Business 
Administration 



PAUL F. SWEENEY 

Charlestown, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



ALFRED W. SWEENIE 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 





Mm fti 



JAMES JOSEPH TIMONEY 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JAMES E. TONRA 

Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Finance 




WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



DANIEL M. THIBAULT 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN R. SUPPLE 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 

EDWARD M. THOMPSON 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 




fe* *s£r 






JOSEPH W. TOPOR, JR. 

Three Rivers, Mass. 
B.S. Finance 



the I960 



DONALD B. TOSI 

Salem, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 





MM 



292 




DANIEL P. TOUMBAKIS 

Sofnerville, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



ROBERT F. TRAINOR 

Scarsdale, New York 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN F. TRACY 

Auburndale, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 

CHARLES CHRISTOPHER 
TRETTER 

Westwood, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



SUB TURRI 



LEONARD F. WALL 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



EDWIN N. WALLWORK 

Newton Centre, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



College of 

Business 
Administration 



NICHOLAS C. VERTULLO 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN R. WAGNER 

Dorchester, Mass. 
'.S. Distribution Management 






RONALD F. WALSH 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



EDWARD J. WHALEN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management 






m**k* 



293 



College of 

Business 
Administration 




ALEXANDER V. WISNESKI 

East Walpole, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management 



STEPHEN R. WITKUN 

Cambridge, Mass. 
>.S. Distribution Management 



JOHN A. WINCHENBAUGH 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 

NORMAN STANLEY ZALKIND 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



LEO J. WINKEL 

Waltham, Mass. 
i.S. Distribution Management 





the I960 SUB TURRI 




" , : 7 




iHliiiijIlJf *; 
1 "1111(1 !U I 





"<***$%*' «*,*, 



• X 




ii =8= hs sk «= -3 e!jT~ 

niliilieii 



School of Nursing 



Senior Class Officers — Jane Shattle, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Grace McLaughlin, President; Judy O'Neil, 
Treasurer; Judy Wechtel, Secretary (absent). 




295 



School of 
Nursing 




ELAINE M. BUCKLEY 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MARTHA A. CADIGAN 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA ANN BARKER 

Winthrop, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 

MARY ELIZABETH CAMPBELL 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHERYN PATRICIA BRENT 

Harwinton, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 

CAROLINE FRANCES 
CHINETTI 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 





JUDITH S. DALEY 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



the I960 



FRANCIS E. DERVAN 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



LINDA ANN COLLINS 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



HELEN PATRICIA CONNELY 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




296 




MARION M. DONAHUE 

Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



NANCY M. DONOHUE 

East Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



School of 
Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. DONOVAN 

Mattapan, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY L. DONOVAN 

Peabody, Mass. 
B.S. Nursling 



JOYCE M. DWYER 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGARET MARY EBNER 

Thomaston, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 




SUB TURRI 



ANNA MARY FAVALORO 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



NANCY L. FIGHTLIN 

New Britain, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing 





MARY E. FINEN 

Haverhill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



ANNE M. FINNEGAN 
Chelsea, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



297 





KATHLEEN C. GOODHUE 

Braintree, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



MARY A. GORMLEY 

Millerton, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



the I960 



PAULINE F. FOGGE 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA JANE GANNON 

Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 




MARY A. HALEY 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA JANE HALL 

East Providence, Rhode Island 

B.S. Nursing 



EVELYN I. HARRINGTON 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



JEANNE MARIE HOAR 

Fort Devens, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA L. HORNE 

Bradford, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MIRIAM R. HORWITZ 

Brookline, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



School of 
Nursing 




298 




A. ELLA HURLEY 

Worcester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGARET A. KANE 

Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



SUB TURRI 




ANN F. KELEHER 

Worcester, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



GAIL M. KENNEY 

Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 




JUDITH M. LYDON 

Abington, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHERINE A. LYNCH 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



FLORA E. MacDONALD 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



JOAN E. MANNIX 
Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



ROSEMARY A. MAYNE 

Wincester, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



MAUREEN McCABE 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




School of 



Nursing 



299 




JUDITH K. McGINN 

Lynn, Mass. 

i.5. Nursing 



MARTHA O'NEIL 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



JUDITH A. O'NEIL 

Brookline, Mass. 
S. Nursing 



grace k. Mclaughlin 

Hanson, Mass. 
B.S. Nursin. 



I960 




SYLVIA C. PIKE 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA QUINN 

Wentham, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



School of 



Nursing 



LORRAINE P. RENDA 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



JANE M. SCHATTLE 

Lincoln, Rhode Island 

B.S. Nursing 




300 




ELEANOR M. SHEA 

Arlington, Mass. 
i.S. Nursin 



LOIS E. SOLARI 

East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



SUB TURRI 



PAULA SWEET 

Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN M. TREANOR 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



JOAN M. VANNIE 

Hartford, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing 



NIJOLA TAMOSHAITIS 

Brocton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




DOLORES L. WELLING 

Peabody, Mass. 
S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH A. WHITE 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY E. WILCOX 

Fall River, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




School of 



Nursing 



301 




RUTH E; WRIGHT 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



School of 



Nursing 



the I960 SUB TURRI 





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302 






Evening College 
of Arts, Sciences 
and 
Business Administration 



SENIOR Class OFFICERS — William Murphy, Treasurer; 
James Welsh, Vice-President; Edward Sullivan, President; 
Marilyn Fitzgerald, Secretary. 





303 




RICHARD R. ALEXANDER 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 






#V 




JAMES E. ANGELINI 

Mattapan, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 




ELLEN E. BARRON 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 



ELDERIC H. BARRY 

Chelsea, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



the I960 




JOSEPHINE C. BENINATI 


CHARLES O. BENSON 


WALTER A. BOWES 


MARY A. BRANNAN 


Revere, Mass. 


Revere, Mass. 


Roslindale, Mass. 


Watertown, Mass. 


B.S. Social Science 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. General Business 


B.S. Social Sciences 



Evening 



School 



MARJORIE E. CASEY 

Swampscott, Mass. 
B.S. Social Science 



MARY THERESA CONNOLLY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Education 




304 




EDWARD F. COSTIGAN 


AGNES CUMM 


Winthrop, Mass. 


Lynn, Mass. 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. English 



SUB TURRI 




NORMA DiBONA 

Quincy, Mass. 
BS. Education 



JOHN J. DONOVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




CHARLES T. DUFFY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



MARIE IRENE DUMONT 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 



MARILYN IRENE FITZGERALD 

Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 



JOAN FLYNN 
Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Education 



JOHN FLYNN 

Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Biology 



ROBERT A. GAUMONT 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




Evening 



School 



305 





JAMES E. GLYNN 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 





PATRICIA MARGARET 


FRANCIS A. HARRINGTON 




GUNNING 


Lexington, Mass. 




Milton, Mass. 


A.B. English 




B.S. Social Sciences 




WILLIAM R. GRAY 






B.S. Accounting 






Dorchester, Mass. 








the I960 







I***".** 



FRANKLIN DEAN HUNT 


PAUL H. JAEHNIG 


m if m 




Waltham, Mass. 


Waltham, Mass. 


m m m 




B.S. General Business 


B.S. General Business 


HmH 








DANIEL POWER LEAHY 


BERNICE M. LEMIRE 






Lowell, Mass. 


Lowell, Mass. 






A.B. Social Sciences 


A.B. English 






JOSEPH A. MAFFEO 


FREDERICK JAMES MASON, JR 






Newtonville, Mass. 


Dorchester, Mass. 






B.S. General Business 


B.S. Accounting 



Evening 



School 




306 




FRANCIS G. MAZZOLA 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Marketing 



SUB TURRI 



JOHN W. McHUGH 

Bridgewater, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 



ROBERT A. McINNIS 

Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science 



JAMES G. MEADE, JR. 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



JAMES F. McNEELY 

Derrv, New Hampshire 
A.B. Social Science 



PAUL HENRY McINNIS 

South Boston, Mass. 

A.B. English 




ROBERT W. MEADE 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. English 



GERALD T. MOORE 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



ROBERT L. MOORE 

Medford, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




Evening 



School 



307 



Evening 



School 





WILLIAM P. MURPHY 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 



4,k 



WILLIAM P. MURRAY 

South Boston, Mass. 
A.B. English 



ROBERT J. OCONNELL 

Dorchester, Mass. 
\.S. General Business 



MARGARET MARY O'HARA 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




THOMAS F. O'HEARN 

Franklin, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



'*"V 



ELIZABETH M. PHELAN 
Lawrence, Mass. 
A.B. Economics 



BENJAMIN J. OSKIN 

Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology 




JAMES A. O'ROURKE, JR. 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



the I960 



RICHARD J. PORT 

Chelsea, Mass. 
A.B. English 




EDWARD JAMES PETTEE 

Abington, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 



I 



308 




ROBERT E. POWER 

Braintree, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



ADELINE C. REILLY 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. English 



Evening 
School 





JOHN J. REMONDI 

Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 




\ 



HHuna^Hi rani 

WILLIAM T. RILEY 

Framingham, Mass. 
A.B. Social Sciences 



SUB TURRI 



WILLIAM FRANCIS RIZZO 

Winthrop, Mass. 
B.S. Marketing 




DOUGLAS J. ROBINSON 

Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. History 





JOHN J. ROCHE 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



THOMAS J. RYAN 

Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 




B.S. Education 



ROBERT L. STAFFIER 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



309 




EDWARD H. SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Social Sciences 



JAMES F. WELCH, JR. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



BERNARD C. VICTORY 

Methuen, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



ROBERTA A. WALSH 

Revere, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 



EDWARD F. SULLIVAN 

Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. English 




ELIZABETH A. WILKINSON 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting 



Evening 



School 



the I960 
SUB TURRI 






PAUL J. WILLIAMSON 

Foxboro, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



THOMAS J. WYNNE 

Allston, Mass. 
B.S. General Business 



HAROLD R. A. WOODS 

Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 




310 




SENIOR Class OFFICERS — Bibiana Cannalonga, Vice-President; Nancy Fernandes, President; Ruth 
Bowers, Secretary-Treasurer; Mary Welter, Senior Class Advisor. 



School of 
Graduate Nursing 





311 



Graduate 
Nursing 




JUANITA J. BEAUCHESNE, R.N. 

Worcester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



CALIOPE MARION 
BELEZOS, R.N. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



ANNA ASDOORIAN, R.N. 

East Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROLE G. BELLOTTI, R.N. 

Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MADELINE MARY 
BACZEK, R.N. 

Webster, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 

ELIZABETH I. BERNIER, R.N. 

Ogdensburg, New York 
B.S. Nursing 




RUTH MARY BOWERS, R.N. CAROL MARIE CAMPBELL, R.N. 

New York, New York New Britain, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



the I960 



BIBIANA CANNALONGA, R.N. ELAINE L. CAPOZZOLI, R.N. 

Webster, Mass. Cranston, Rhode Island 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 




312 




Graduate 
Nursing 



CATHERINE NANCY 
CAPRON, R.N. 

Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 

ROBERTA ANN CARUSO, R.N. 

Manchester, Connecticut 

B.S. Nursing 



SARAH CATHERINE 
CARROLL, R.N. 

Massena, New York 
B.S. Nursing 

SR. CATHERINE, R.N. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



NANCY PATRICIA 
CORCORAN, R.N. 

Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



SISTER MARY CORITA, 

S.M.S.M., R.N. 

Framington Center, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 




SUB TURRI 



MARGARET ANN 
CURTIN, R.N. 

Syracuse, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



CLAIRE CAVANAUGH 
DAILEY, R.N. 

Cranston, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



VIRGINIA A. CROWLEY, R.N. 

Worcester, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



HELEN ELIZABETH 
CURTIN, R.N. 

Salem, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 





313 




ROSE MARIE DeBALSI, R.N. 

Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



JACQUELYN DEEGAN, R.N. 

Attleboro, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 




JANET DEAN DONOHUE, R.N. 

Natick, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



VIRGINIA ANN 
DOOLING, R.N. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



the I960 




PATRICIA ALAYNE 
ESPOSITO, R.N. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH THERESA 
FAHEY, R.N. 

Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



GLENDA FARRELL, R.N. 

Watertown, Mass. 
B.S, Nursing 

CAROL ANN FORD, R.N. 

Holbrook, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



Graduate 



Nursing 



NANCY AMEILA 
FERNANDES, R.N. 

Marion, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 

ALICE GADOURY, R.N. 

Woonsocket, R. I. 
B.S. Nursing 




314 




ANNETTE ZELMA GACNE, R.N. 

Newport, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



SARAH J. GIBSON, R.N. 

Monrovia, Liberia 
B.S. Nursing 



SUB TURRI 




JEAN MARIE GRADY, R.N. CAROLYN MARY GREEN, R.N. 

Leominster, Mass. Auburn, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 




JOAN E. HARRINGTON, R.N. 

Brookline, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 

ANN ELIZABETH KELLY, R.N. 

Manlius, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGARET MARY 
HOPPER, R.N. 

Newington, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing 

AGNES KEOHANE, R.N. 

Brockton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



SISTER MARY IDA, 
S.M.S.M., R.N. 

Framington Center, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




BARBARA JOYCE, R.N. 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



Graduate 
Nursing 



315 




MARY PELL KHOURY, R.N 

Brockton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHRYN ANNE 
MacQUEEN, R.N. 

Jersey City, New Jersey 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGARET JANE 
LENNON, R.N. 

Elberon, New Jersey 
B.S. Nursing 



BARBARA G. LEONARD, R.N. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



MARJORIE JANE 
LANGWAY, R.N. 

West Springfield, Mass 
B.S. Nursing 



I960 




ELLEN FRANCES 
MADDEN, R.N. 

Cranston, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA M. MANN, R.N. 

E. Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 

DEIRDRE JOAN 
McAULIFFE, R.N. 

New York, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



SR. ROSE MARY, C.S.S.J., R.N. 

Waterbury, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing 

MARGARET McCLUSKEY, R.N. 

Halton, Maine 
B.S. Nursing 



Graduate 
Nursing 




316 




JOAN CAROL McGINNIS, R.N 

Providence, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



SUB TURRI 



MARY ELLEN McGOWAN, R.N. 

Albany, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



FRANCIS McLEAN, R.N. 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




FLORENCE MICHAUD, R.N. 

New Bedford, Mass. 
S. Nursing 



VIRGINIA DESNEW 
McMAHON, R.N. 

Woodside, New York 
B.S. Nursing 



MARCELLINE MARY 

McSWEENEY, R.N. 

Troy, New York 

B.S. Nursing 



ROSALIE E. MIELNICKI, R.N. BERNARDINE N. MILLER, R.N. 

Uxbridge, Mass. West Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 




Graduate 



Nursing 



317 



Graduate 
Nursing 




BRENDA M. MOYNAHAN, R.N. 

Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



SHEILA MONICA 
MULHOLLAND, R.N. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



MARGOT MULLIN, R.N. 

Lincroft, New Jersey 
B.S. Nursing 



MARJORIE ANN O'BRIEN, R.N 

Baldwinville, Mass. 
B.S, 




IVY B. O'DONNELL, R.N. 

Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



the I960 



MARGARET ANTON 
O'SULLIVAN, R.N. 

Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



MADELINE C. PAPILE, R.N. 

Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




ANN THERESE O'NEIL, R.N 

Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



318 




Graduate 
Nursing 



SR. PATRICIA, S.G.M., R.N. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH ANNE 

PENDERGAST, R.N. 

Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 




BARBARA JANE RASICOT, R.N. 

Seymour, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY H. REGAN, R.N. 

Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



RITA M. PLUMMER, R.N. 

Stoneham, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICIA LEE POQUETTE, R.N. 

Alburg, Vermont 

B.S. Nursing 




SUB TURRI 



JUDITH ANNE 
ROBILLARD, R.N. 

Pascoag, Rhode Island 
B.S. Nursing 



LEONA ALFREDA 
ROUSSEAU, R.N. 

Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 





MARIALYSE L. ROY, R.N. 

Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



ALICE E. RYAN, R.N. 

South Lincoln, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



319 



Graduate 
Nursing 




JOAN ELLEN RYAN, R.N. 

Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing 



JOSEPHINE E. SAGEBEER, R.N. 

Hartford, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 



DOROTHY L. SEXTON, R.N. 

Ansonia, Connecticut 
B.S. Nursing 



LORELLE MARIA 
ST. PIERRE, R.N. 

Jaffrey, New Hampshire 
B.S. Nursing 




LENA SILVA, R.N. 

Lincoln, Rhode Island 

B.S. Nursing 



CAROL BARBARA SMITH, R.N. 

Ridgefield, New Jersey 
B.S. Nursing 



HARRIET R. STEVENS, R.N. 

Salem, New Hampshire 

B.S. Nursing 




MARY P. SULLIVAN, R.N. 

Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 




ELIZA JANE VanHOOK, R.N. 

Leicester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing 



the I960 



PATRICIA DURKIN 
VISCARDI, R.N. 

Jersey City, New Jersey 
B.S. Nursing 




320 




MARGARET D. WAYMAN, 


R.N. 


BERNADINE 


Jefferson, Ohio 




WOJTANOWSKI, R.N 


B.S. Nursing 




Boston, Mass. 


ALICE DOWDALL 




B.S. Nursing 


HAMILTON, R.N. 






Brookline, Mass. 






B.S. Nursing 








SUB TURRI 



Graduate 
Nursing 



1 1 1 



u'ij 



'S| || 




8! Hi S!B» 



II II 



I 




VI 




FEATURES 



323 




mtamsmsmm 



jSaWjMSr^gg^SL 



AN INTANGIBLE 



324 




■ 



^/-'' ; "i».i*r : '"'■' "■=:"" »■ 




Shadow, light, depth, and height — the indispensable ele- 
ments to be found in every picture, elements without which 
there is nothing, no true image, no reality. Yet who notices 
them except when they are conspicuously absent? Thus none 
but the most observant advert to these elements in the picture 
of Boston College. 

Does the reason lie in the curse of stultifying routine? Or in 
the damnable lethargy of indifference and callousness toward 
the obvious, natural beauties of our campus? Whether it be 
either of these ot perhaps some more subtle indefinable reason, 
they will, nevertheless, continue to exist necessarily, noticed 
or not. 

This is fortunate; for they are symbols of the life which is 
uniquely that of Boston College. So intimately united are they 
that one suggests the other; that they complement each other 
in vitalizing otherwise inanimate stone, mortar, metal, and 
glass, that from the union of their contrasting essences is born 
an intangible, call it spirit, Boston College spirit, — an intan- 
gible which alumni perpetuate, which seniors never lose, and 
which eleven hundred freshmen discover. 

Truly, then, this is Boston College. 




325 




326 



. <■->. 






Spirit of Place! It is for this we travel, to surprise its subtlety; and 
where it is a strong and dominant angel, that place, seen once, abides 
entire in the memory with all its own accidents, its habits, its breath, 
its name. It is recalled all a lifetime, having been perceived a week, and 
is not scattered but abides, one living body of remembrance. The un- 
ravelled spirit of place — not to be pursued, for it never flies, but 
always to be discovered, never absent, without variation — lurks in the 
by-ways and rules over the towers, indestructible, an indescribable unity. 
It awaits us always in its ancient and eager freshness. It is sweet and 
vivacious within its immemorial boundaries, but it never crosses them. 
Long white roads outside have mere suggestions of it and prophecies; 
they give promise not of its coming, for it abides, but of a new and 
singular and unforeseen goal for our present pilgrimage, and of an 
intimacy to be made. Was ever journey too hard or too long that had 
to pay such a visit? And if by good fortune it is a child who is the 
pilgrim, the spirit of place gives him a peculiar welcome, for antiquity 
and the conceiver of antiquity ( who is only a child ) know one another; 
nor is there a more delicate perceiver of locality than a child. He is 
well used to words and voices that he does not understand, and this is 
a condition of his simplicity; and when those unknown words are bells, 
loud in the night, they are to him as homely and as old as lullabies. 

They mingle with the sound of feet in unknown streets, they are the 
voices of an unknown tower; they are loud in their own language. The 
spirit of place, which is to be seen in the shapes of the fields and the 
manner of the crops, to be felt in a prevalent wind, breathed in the 
breath of the earth, overheard in a far street cry, . . . calls out and peals 
in the cathedral bell. It speaks its local tongue remotely, steadfastly, 
largely, clamorously, loudly, and greatly by these voices; you hear the 
sound in its dignity, and you know how familiar, how childlike, how 
lifelong it is in the ears of the people. The bells are strange, and you 
know how homely they must be. Their utterances are, as it were, the 
classics of a dialect. 

— Alice Meynell — 




To capture this spirit of place in words is as futile 
as to attempt to paint or touch an intangible. Yet it 
is real, alive — animating the physical environment of 
any particular place. 

It pervades Boston College. 



Its image can be found in every act performed 
within the scope of four years' time. But how will it 
be recalled when many years separate its now quite 
distinct features from that elusive phantasm with 
which time inevitably replaces even the most memo- 
rable occurrences of the present? 

Most likely the image will be restored not by^he 
latter, but by scores of apparently insignificant actions 
— remembered for no reason other than the small but 
necessary role they played in building the whole called 
"college life" . . . perhaps by the routine . . . 




. the morning trek from Lake St. 



the daily climb from the parking lot 



330 




and under all conditions 



. perhaps by the tedious hours of discipline 




tf] 




the brief minutes of respite 



. to rela 





332 




. momentarily 



Yes, this spirit of place that permeates Boston 
College will be remembered in countless ways — as a 
being ever solicitous for our nature as men. 





Dr. Nathan Pusey, Christopher Dawson, Very Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J., Sir Alec Guiness. 






*f: 





. by such events as Junior Week 





**k V 



L'V±:. * 



JR ^ J "?.coiicEirr 



the Military Ball 



Kaydette Kolonel, Mary Anne Jackson (Photos 
courtesy of Mr. Mark Finley. A. W'allman, Boston 
Record- American) 




the Cross rally 





. the Interclass Skits 






341 



with bodies to develop 




m 




M&"* i: '"■ 




m 



. with a country to serve 









l*pN|?* 





"^ 









. and with immortal souls to save. 



What success this spirit that is Boston College has 
attained in forming us, the class of I960, to the 
measure of true Catholic sons is a question beyond the 
scope of this book. Unquestionably, somewhere in the 
inscrutable future lies the answer we seek ... so be it. 




344 





Advertising Section 363-389 

Epilogue 394-398 

Patrons 390-393 

Senior Activities and Directory 347-362 

Sub Turri Staff . . . 346 



345 



I960 Sub Turri 



Editor-in-Chief 
Paul D. Campanella 



Business Manager 
William J. Perron, Jr. 



Managing Editor 
William O'Connor 



Assistant Editor 
Robert A. Keating 



Assistant Business Manager 
Collections Manager 
William F. Kelly 

Advertising Manager 

Walter H. O'Leary 

Patrons Manager 

Eileen M. O'Sullivan 

Accountant 

David N. Barry 

Advertising Staff 

John F. McAuIiffe, Jr. 
Joseph F. Perachi, Jr. 
Robert H. Rudman 
Daniel G. Bova 
Edward C. Huff 
Joseph R. Carty 

Senior Sections Editors 
Gerard J. Hayes 
Charles F. Brophy 
Paul J. Cunningham 

Faculty Editor 

Robert G. Doyle, Jr. 



Activities Editor 

Robert A. Keating 

Academics Editor 

Christopher C. Morton 

Sports Editors 

Christopher C. Morton 
Philip K. Langan 
Mario DiBelardino 

Art Editor 

Jan Hermans 

Photography Editor 
John Mullen 

Associate Editors 

William T. Riley 
Mary L. Donovan 
Carol A. Ford 

Social Chairman 

Robert A. Keating 

Communications Coordinator 
John E. Joyce 

Moderator 

Rev. J. Frank Devine, S.J. 



Production Staff 

John Thompson, Mario DiBelardino, Joseph Steinkrauss, Donna Mason, Ronald McCaffrey, Martin Nolan, Brian 
Moran, Paul Barrett, Greg Burke, James Cunniff, Louise Aubuchon. 

Clerical Staff 

Alice Duffy, Elinor Siciliano, Mary Calabro, Barbara Feely, Pat Eckert, Maryanne Grusauskas, Beth Bartholemew, 
Nancy Sheehan, Sharon Bernier, Pat Bocchichio, Frank Duffy, Susie Magee, Charles Duffy, Janet Davis, Pat Stankunas, 
Rosemary Woods, Pauline LeBlanc. 

Collections Staff 

Michael Brown, Brian Dooley, Robert Doyle, Edward Hughes, Robert Marcotullio, Thomas Riddell, Louis Verde, Dave 
White, Charles Wujcik, Richard Zilinski, Maurice Daly, Mary Hines, Robert O'Regan, Mary Quinlan, Sally Ann 
Stearns, Randall Astolfi, Al Bernazani, Thomas Cummings, William Elbery, James Hoye, Edward Huff, Barry Mitchell, 
John Mullen, Thomas O'Brien, James O'Keefe, Richard Pierce, Charles Tretter, Kathleen Goodhue, Pat Hall, 
Judith Lydon, Richard Alexander, Marilyn Fitzgerald, John Remondi, Roberta Walsh, Virginia Dooling, Cynthia 
Mello, Jane Van Hook. 



346 



College of Arts and Sciences 



DAVID FRANCIS ALLEN 

35 Aberdeen Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Aquinas Circle 4; Young 
Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3. 



DON AID J. ARMSTRONG 
9 Olive St., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Vice President 4); German Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Treasurer 3, Vice President 4); Chess Club 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

OSCAR C. AUBIN, JR. 

215 Bncklin St., Pawtucket, R. I. 

B.S. Economics — Class Council (Secretary 2); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4, 3; Rhode Island Club 4, 3; Cadet 
Officers' Club 4, 3; Section Representative 1; WBCB 4; 
als 4, 3, 2, 1. 



CHARLES JOSEPH BARBANTI 

22 Porter St., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Bellarmine Law and Governmen 
Academy 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 4); Economics Academy 4 
3, 2; Freshman Orientation 4; Psychology Club 4, 3 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Marketing Club 4 
Intramurals 2, 1. 

MICHAEL J. BARRY 

704 Washington St, Ogdensbr/rg, N. Y. 
A.B. Pre-Medical 

JOHN J. BENEDETTO 

37 Elm St., Wakefield, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Cross and Crown 4; Ricci Mathe- 
matics Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; German Academy 4, 3, 2 
(Treasurer 4, Secretary 3); Section Representative 2; 
Cosmos 4, 3; Ricci Mathematics Journal 3, 2, 1 (Editor 
in Chief 3). 

THOMAS J. BIRMINGHAM 

73 IFejf ft., Milford, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Scholar of the College 4; Cross and 

Crown (Marshal 4); Cosmos 4, 3 (Editor 4) ; Sigma Pi 

Sigma 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Section Representa- 



THOMAS P. BLOMSTROM 

12 Legion St., Canton, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemistry Club 4, 3, 2, 1; I: 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

LAWRENCE J. BOUCHER 

34 Normandy Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Mathe 



of Physics 4, 3, 2, 1; 



JOHN J. BOYLE 

10 Longfellow Rd,, Natick, Mass. 
B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3; i 
Physics 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM H. BRADY 

28 Sargent St., Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Economics 

JOHN J. BRENNAN 

73 Pleasant Circle, Canton, Mas 
B.S. Physics — American Instit 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CHARLES FREDERICK BROPHY 

61 Hudson St.. Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; 
Economics Academy 4; Sub Turri 4 (Senior Editor); 
Dean's List; Intramurals 3, 2. 

MICHAEL A. BROWN 

432 Field Point Rd., Greenwich, Conn. 
B.S. Economics — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; New York Club 
4, 3, 2, 1; Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; WBCB 4; 
Marquette Debating Club 2, 1; Public Speaking Club 3, 
2, 1; Dorm Council 3; Section Representative 2; Election 
Committee 4; Sub Turri 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



KENNETH T. BUCKLEY 

47 Zeller St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

DONALD J. BURKE 

77 Floral St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 
B.S. Physics — Cross and Crown 4; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 
3 (Vice President 4); American Institute of Physics 2, 
1; Physics Club 4, 3 (Vice President 4); Cosmos 4, 3 
(Associate Editor); Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 
2; German Academy 2; Dean's List. 

RICHARD JOSEPH BURKE 

66 Boudoin St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; 
Camera Club 4; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4, 3; Economics Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, I. 

EDWARD J. BYINGTON 

38 Linden St., Fall River, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; Public Speaking Club 3; Intra- 
murals 2,1. 

ARTHUR A. BYRON, JR. 

303 Lowell St., Lexington, Mass. 

A.B. English — English Academy 4; Stylus 4. 

KENNETH C. CAHILL 

15 Amherst St., Danvers, Mass. 

B.S. English — Section Representative 1; World Rela- 
tions League 4; Cadet Officers' Club 3; Drill Team 3, 2; 
als 2, 1. 



WILLIAM GEORGE CAHILL 

10 Yeamans St., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Section Representative 
3; World Relations League 4; Psychology Club 3, 2; 
Public Speaking Club 4; Historical Society 4, 3; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3, 2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 



ALLEN R. CAIL 

169 Franklin St., Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Aquinas 
Circle 4; Hockey 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
EUGENE A. CALABRO 
1 2 Mayberry Ave., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3 (Vice Presi- 
dent 4); Senior Communion Breakfast Committee (Gen- 
eral Chairman 4); Aquinas Circle 4; Frc.slim.in Orienta- 
tion 4; Intramurals 3, 1; Dean's List. 



MICHAEL DONALD GEORGE CALLAHAN 

19 Highland St., Sharon, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 2 
1; Psychology Club 4, 3; Connecticut Club 4; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 

PAUL D. CAMPANELLA 

9 Emerson Rd., Milton, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Sub Turri 4 (Editor in Chief); Glee 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4, Chorale 3, 2, 1; Home 
Concert Committee 3, 2, 1; Advertising Manager 3); 
Cross and Crown 4 (Marshal); Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; 
Drill Team 4, 3, 2, I; Sodality 1; Commencement Com- 
mittee 3; Freshman Orientation 2; Section Representative 
2,1; Dean's List. 

EARLE THOMAS CAMPBELL 

464 Wolcott St., Auburndale, Mass. 

B.S. History — Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Young Democrats Club 
3; Historical Society 4, 3. 

ROBERT R. CAPOBIANCO 

430 McCrath Hwy., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Government — Rifle Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 2). 

WILLIAM L. CARNEY 

1334 River St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

A.B. History — Phi Alpha Theta 4 (Vice President 4); 
Historical Society 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4, 3; World Relations League 4; Dean's List; 
Intramurals 1. 



JOHN M. CARR 

11 Newsome Pk., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. History — Historical Society 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3, 2; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; 
Dean's List. 

WILLIAM JAMES CARRABIS 

15 Windsor St., Melrose, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD CARTON 

85 Pinkert St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Omicron Chi Epsilon 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Economics Academy 
4; Section Representative 2; Track 4, 3, 2, 1; Football 
Manager I; Freshman Orientation l; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

ANTHONY B. CASHMAN, JR. 

1 14 Boulevard, Bayonne, N. J. 

B.S. Economics — New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice 

President 4,3); Cadet Officers' Club 3 ( Secretary 3 ) ; 

Foreign Trade Club 4, 3 ( Secretary 4, 3 ) ; Economics 

Academy 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

GEORGE ROBERT CASSELL 

R.D. No. 1, Box 313, Newton, N. J. 

B.S. History — Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 

4, 3; Historical Society 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3. 

EUGENE J. CATALDO, JR. 

-tO Squire Rd., Winchester, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Phi Alpha Theta 4; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4; Economics Academy 4, 3; 
Intramurals 4, 3; Dean's List. 

A. ANTHONY CHEN 

6 Widcombe Rd., Kingston, Jamaica, W. Indies 
B.S. Physics — Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 
3 (Secretary 4); Sodality 4, 3, 2 (Secretary-Treasurer 
4); Cosmos 4, 3 (Physics Editor 4); Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Debating Society 2; C. D. Instructor 
4; Dean's List. 

EUGENE STEPHEN CLASBY 

56 Harris St., Waltham, Mass. 

A.B. English — Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; The Stylus 4, 3 
(Business Manager 4, 3); English Academy 4; German 
Academy 4; Dean's List. 

DAVID F. CLOONEY 

Deny Rd., Chester, N. H. 

A.B. English — Historical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; German 

Academy 4; English Academy 4. 

JAMES M. COFFEY 

23 Langley Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Sodality 3, 2, 1; Economics Academy 

3, 2; Debating Club 2; Finance Club 3; Inttamurals 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROY ANTHONY COLELLA 

30 Theresa Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 3, 2; Cosmos 4; Band 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Junior Show 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

WALTER F. COLANTUONO 

90 Hillside Rd.. Dedbam, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; American Institute 
of Physics 2, 1; Sailing Team 4, 3, 2; Italian Academy 
3, 2; Cosmos 4, 3; Psychology Club 4; Physics Club 4, 
3; Junior Week 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

MALCOLM COLLINS 

5 Watson St., East Islip, Long Island, N. Y. 

A.B. English — Cross and Crown 4; Dramatic Society 3, 

2 ( President 3 ) ; Dean's List. 



PATRICK BRENDAN COLLINS 

184 Dover St., New Haven. Conn. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 
3; American Institute of Physics 2, 1; Cosmos 4; Con- 
necticut Club 4, 3, 2. 1 (Vice President 4); Com- 
mencement Ball Committee 4; Junior Prom Committee 
3; Junior Show 3; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

FREDERICK W. COLMAN 

71 Alban St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Sodality 4, 3, 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Football 1; 
Intramurals 4, 3. 

STEPHEN F. CONCANNON 

74 Grant St., Portland, Me. 

B.S. History and Government — Maine Club 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS MAXWELL CONNELLY, JR. 

82 Cabot St., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Baseball 2. 

JOHN GREGORY CONNOR, JR. 

240 Allston St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Math Society 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 2, 1. 
EUGENE P. CONNORS 
8 Rena St., Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology — Psychology Club 



2; Intramurals 



J. PETER CONRY 

47 Windsor Ave., Pitts field, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Western 

Massachusetts Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



MAURICE B. CONWAY 

27 Mendum St., Roslindale, Mass. 

A.B. History — Glee Club 4, 3; Gold Key Society 4, 

3, 2, 1. 

FRANK COPPOLA 

9 Gor/W» 5f„ Lawrence, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

JOHN V. CORCORAN, JR. 

19 Harding Ave., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. History — Historical Society 4, 3; Dean's List; Intra- 



BRIAN THOMAS COUNIHAN 

11 Fossdale Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. French — C. D. Instructor 4, 3, 2; Gold Key 
Society 4, 3, 2; French Club 4, 3, 2; WBCB 4, 3 
( Station Manager 4 ) ; Freshman Orientation 4; Senior 
Week ( Chairman of Day of Recollection) . 

THOMAS P. COX 

1238 Commonueallh Arc. West Newton, Mass. 
B.S. English — Sodality 1; Mendel Club 2, 1; Young 
Democrats Club 4, 3; Public Speaking Club 3; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 

TIMOTHY H. CRONIN 

11 Pine Lodge Rd., West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemistry Club 4, 3, 2, 1; American 

Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 2. 

RONALD P. CURCIO 

9 Johnson Ave., West Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2; Glee Club 

4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 



MARTIN F. CURLEY, JR. 

73 Draper St., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 3, 2, 1; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Section Representative 
1; Dean's List. 

ANDREW FRANCIS CURTIN, III 

95 Governor's Ave., Medford, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Freshman Class Vice President; Glee 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3, Vice President 4); Mendel 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CHARLES P. DALEY 

28 Mt. Vernon St., Gloucester, Mass. _ 
B.S. History and Government — Seniot Class Treasurer; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Young Democrats Club 4, 3; Historical Society 4. 

JOHN C. DALEY 

20 Saltonstall Rd,. Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 
3, 2, f 1; Chess Club 3, 2, 1; Cosmos 4; Band 4, 3, 2; 
Dean's List. 

EARL J. DALTON 

43 Bradeen St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; 
Economics Academy 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 4, 3; ." 



JAMES C. DALY 

42 Brae Bum Rd.. Auburndale. Mass. 
B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3, 2; Drill Team 4, 3, 
2; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Dean's List; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 

ALPHONSE A. D'ANGELO 

15 Bristol St., Southington, Conn. 

B.S. Modern Languages — Foreign Trade Club 2; Italian 

Academy 2, 1; Connecticut Club 2; Dean's List. 

ALBERT F. DAVIS 

4 Highland Ave., Beverly, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3, 2; American In- 
stitute of Physics 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



DONALD JOHN DAY 

16 Prescott St.. Wellesley Hills. Mass. 

B.S. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, s, 2; Soccer Teai 

2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



347 



JOSEPH L. DAY, JR. 

21 Glenmont Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

A.B. History — Historical Society 3; Bella 

Government Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3. 

STEPHEN O. DEAN, JR. 

2577 Parkview Dr., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
B.S. Physics — Cross and Crown 4; An 
of Physics 2; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3 (Treasurer 3, Presi- 
dent 4); Cosmos 4, 3 (Manamim l : ditor 4); New York 
Club 2; Deans List; Intramurals 2. 



ROBERT LEO DENNEHY 

52 Redlands Rd.. West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. English — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PAUL A. DESAULNIERS 

65 Sterling St., Lowell, Mass. 

A.B. Modern Language — French Academy 3, 2; De 

PETER J. DESIO 

226 Bennington St., East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; An 
Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2; Dean's List. 

RICHARD V. DESROSIERS 

Temple St., Greenville, N. H. 

A.B. Latin — German Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 

4) ; Historical Society 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CARMEN ANTHONY DiMAGGIO 

Depot St., West ford, Mass. 
A.B. Mathematics. 

MARTIN J. P. DOCKERY 

16 Grand view Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 
B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 3, 2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2, 1; Junior Week 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN T. DOHERTY 

6 Roseclair St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 
3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Drill Team 3, 2; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

PAUL R. DOHERTY 

59 Wyman St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government 

THOMAS DOLAN 

28 Lawrence St., Wobnrn, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Historical Society 4; 
Intramurals 4, 1. 

JOHN R. DONELAN 

67 Dakota St., Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. Sociology 

DAVID F. DONOHOE 

29 Eaton Ave.. Wohurn, Mass. 
B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Sub Turri 4; 



rals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



BRIAN R. DOOLEY 

22 Grayson Lane, Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; American 
Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2. 1; Cadet Officers' Club 
4, 3; Sub Turri 4; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 
3, 2, 1. 

MICHAEL J. DORNEY 

48 Thompson Hill Rd., Milford, Conn. 
B.S. History and Government — Cross and Crown 4; 
Phi Alpha Theta 4 ( President 4 ) ; Senior Class Secretary 
Class Council 4; Student Senate 4 (Secretary 4); His- 
torical Society 4, 3 (Vice President 4); Gold Key 
Society 3; Dormitory Council 3, 2; Cadet Officers' Club 
3; Connecticut Club 2, 1; Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 3, 2; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

PAUL J. DOWNEY 

2M Meridian Pkwy., Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 
2, 1; Psychology Club 3; Historical Society 3; Dean's 
List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT G. DOYLE, JR. 

57 Hampshire St., Methuen, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Cross and Crown 4; Omicron Chi 
Epsilon 4, 3, (Treasurer 3); Aquinas Circle 4; Glee 
Club 4, 3; Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Cadet Officers' 
Club 4, 3; Sub Turri 4 (Faculty Editor); Band 4, 3, 
2, 1; Dormitory Council 3, 2; Freshman Orientation 3; 
Dean's List. 

RICHARD EDWARD DRISCOLL 

26 Howard St., Rockland, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 2; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 2. 

JAMES J. DRUMMEY, JR. 

41 Nichols St., Norwood. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2 (Treas- 
urer 4); Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 
3; Section Representative 4; Freshman Orientation 4, 
3; WBCB 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CLARK G. DUNCAN 

2 70 Windsor Rd., Waban, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology — Psychology Club 2; Cadet Officers' 
Club 4, 3; Freshman Hockey 1; Varsity Hockey 4, 3, 
2; Pike's Peak Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN R. DUNN, JR. 
Myrtle St., Norfolk, Mass. 
B.S. English 

GEORGE T. DUNNE 

1242 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Class Treasurer 2, 1; Gold Key Soci- 
ety 4, 3, 2, 1 (Keyholder); Public Speaking Club 1; 
Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Cheerleader 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Captain 3); Freshman Prom Committee (Chairman). 

JAMES LEO EAGAN 

46 Holton St., Allston, Mass. 
A.B. English 



JOHN J. EDDY 

491 Morris St., Albany, N.Y. 

A.B. History and Government — Cross and Crown 4; 

Phi Alpha Theta 4 (Treasurer); The Stylus 4, 3, 2, 

1 (Senior Editor 4, 3, Associate Editor 2); Historical 
Society 3; Economics Academy 4; World Relations 
League 4; Dean's List. 

PETER N. EDMONDS 

66 Griswold St., Cambridge, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4. 

WALTER J. EDYVEAN 

-t2 Windsor Rd., Medford, Mass. 

A.B. English — Sodality 4; Gold Key Society 3, 2; 

WBCB 4; French Academy 3, 2. 

FRANCIS A. ENNIS 

275 Galliran Blvd., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Cross and Crown 4; Mendel Club 

4, 3; Glee Club 3, 1; World Relations League 4, 3, 2 

( Vice President 4 ) ; Dean's List 

JOHN CHARLES ENRIGHT 

4 Pine St.. Winchester, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology — Psychology Club 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4; German Club 4; Mendel Club 1; Heights 4; 
Commencement Week 4. 

JOHN F. ERWIN, JR. 

34 Crescent Dr., Convent, N.J. 

A.B. French — New York Club 4, 3; Glee Club 4, 3, 

2 (Treasurer 4) ; Band 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 

ANDREW MURPHY ESPOSITO, JR. 

15 Oregon Ave.. Hamden, Conn. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3. 2; Connecti- 
cut Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 3); Freshman Prom 
Committee; Commencement Week, Chairman Ball Com- 
mittee; Section Representative 2, 1. 

JOSEPH E. EVERETT 

802 Centre St., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
A.B. Sociology 

JAMES P. FAGAN 

223 Dow Ave., Carle Place, N.Y. 

B.S. History and Government — New York Club 4, 3 

2, 1; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Dormitory Council 4 
Rifle Team 4, 3; Rifle Club 4, 3 (Secretary 4) 
WBCB 4. 

VINCENT P. A. FAILLA 

215 School St., Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM S. FALLA 

20 Cortes St., Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Biology 

DAVID RAYMOND FARMER 

210 Elm St., Amesbury, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Public 
Speaking Club 3, 2; Debating Society 1; Cadet Officers' 
Club 4, 3; Band 3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 1. 

ROBERT J. FINN 

6 Anawan Terr., West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3, 2; American 

Institute of Physics 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOSEPH M. FINNEGAN 

163 Train St., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Senior 

Dinner Dance 4 ( Co-Chairman) ; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES F. FITZGERALD, JR. 

137 Otis St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 2; Public 
Speaking Club 2; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1, 

WILLIAM F. FITZGERALD 

12 Cumberland St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — American Chemical Society Affiliate 
4, 3, 2, 1; Chemistry Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4); 
Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

COLEMAN J. FLAHERTY 

10 Richardson St., Woburn, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology — Junior Class President; Sophomore 
Class Vice President; Class Council Chairman 3; Student 
Senate Vice President 4; Economics Academy 2, 1; 
Camera Club 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS FRANCIS FLYNN 

94 Broadway. South Portland. Maine 

B.S. Physics — Track 4, 3, 2, 1; (Varsity Manager 4); 
Maine Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 4); American 
Institute of Physics 2, 1; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3. 

WILLIAM J. FLYNN, JR. 

229 Liberty St., Rockland, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4. 2; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4, 2; Intramurals 4, 

3, 2, 1. 

COLEMAN J. FOLEY 

12 Cypress St., Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3; Delta 

Sigma Pi 4, 3 (Vice President 4); Economics Academy 

4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 
3; Freshman Orientation 4, 3; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

GIRARD J. FORTIN 

83 Boston St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Gold Key Society 2; Economics Acad- 
emy 4; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RALPH RICHARD FOWLER, JR. 

73 West Mam St., Merrimac, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's 

List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES E. FRANEY 

6 Brighton St., North Abington, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2; Blessed Oliver 

Plunkett Society 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 



RUSSELL J. FRAZIAN 

433 Huntington Ave. K Hyde Park, Mass. 
A.B. English — Spanish Academy 2, 1; English Academy 
4; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; Mars- 
Amateur Radio 2; Dean's List 4, 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM H. FRIARY, JR. 

1 Waldeck St., Dorchester. Mass. 

A.B. French — Cross and Crown 4; Section Represent- 
ative 2; French Academy 4, 3, 2 (President 4); Film 
Society 4, 3 (Chairman 4); Public Speaking Club 2; 
World Relations League 3; Class Treasurer 3; Student 
■ 4) ; Dean's List. 



ANGELO V. GAGLIANO 

2912 Holland Ave., New York 67, N.Y. 
B.S. Biology. 

BRENDAN JAMES GALVIN 

6 Elm St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Scope 

3 (Associate Editor 3) ; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS F. GALVIN 

140 Milton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Classics — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary, Treasurer 

3; Prefect 4); French Academy 3, 2; Psychology Club 

3. 2; Dean's List. 

HARRY P. GANLEY 

60 Norfolk St., Dorchester, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

FRANCIS X. GARREPY 

26 Cummings Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sodality 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3, 2 (President 4); Physics Club 4, 3, 2; 
German Academy 2, 1; Film Society 4, 3; Chess Club 
3; Cosmos 4,3. 

WALTER P. GIBBONS 

27 Ashfield St., Roshndale, Mass. 

B.S. History — Sodality 2, 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; Gold Key Society 2, 1; Historical Society 4; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; 
Accounting Club 4; Psychology Club 4, 2; Marketing 
Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 1. 

JAMES P. GILLIGAN 

355 Chestnut St., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Government — Bellarmine Law and Government 

Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Economics Academy 

4, 3; Psychology Club 3; Historical Society 3, 2; Com- 
mencement Committee 3; Freshman Orientation 4, 3; 
Dean's List; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

CHARLES A. GIORDANO 

76 Brooir 5/., East Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Government — Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 

LAURENCE D. GLEASON 

51 Egerton Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. English — Dramatic Society 4, 3. 2, 1 (President 

3) ; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Heights 4, 3, 2. 

CHARLES W. GODDARD 

J4 Florence St., South Portland, Maine 
B.S. History and Government — Maine Club 4, 3, 2; 
WBCB 4; Dormitory Council 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1 

BRUCE McLEAN GOLDEN 

38 Pleasant St., Everett, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, I; Psychology 

Club 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JOHN MICHAEL GORMAN 

23 Emerson Rd.. W alert own, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — American Institute of Physics 2, 1; 

Physics Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM T. GORMAN 

50 Hamilton St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Modern Languages — French Academy 4, 3, 2. 

MICHAEL F. GORMLEY 

227 South Whitney St., Hartford, Conn. 
B.S. Physics — Cross and Crown 4; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; 
( Secretary-Treasurer 4 ) ; Ricci Mathematics Academy 
3; Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3. 

JOSEPH JOHN GOUTHRO 

85 Kathleen Rd.. Brockton, Mass. 

A.B. English — Humanities 3; German Academy 4, 2; 

Historical Society 4, 3; CD. In 



ROBERT FRANCIS GREENE 

52 Martin Rd., Milton, Mass. 

A.B. French — Aquinas Circle 4; Rifle Team 4, 3; 

Radio Club 4, 3; French Academy 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS F. GRIMES, JR. 

46 Ventura St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Sciences. 

PIERCE J. HALEY 

97 Parker St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Section Representative 4; Economics 

Academy 4, 3; Public Speaking Club 4. 

JEREMIAH F. HALLISEY 

708 Palmer St., Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. English. 

ROBERT RYAN HANNAN 

18 East Washington St., Glens Falls, N.Y. 

B.S. History — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Historical 

Society 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Government Society 

4, 3, 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Junior Week 

3; Intramurals 4, 3. 2, 1. 



LAURENCE HARDIGAN 

44 AWy .S7., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — WBCB 4; Economics Academy 4, 3, 

2; In 



DENNIS M. HARRINGTON 

50 Williams St., North Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Biology. 



348 



ROBERT FRANCIS XAVIER HART 

121 Mt. Washington St.. Lowell, Mass. 

A.B. Sociology — Heights 4, 3, 2, 1 (Managing Editor 

4); Dormitory Council 4, 3, 2 (President 4, Treasurer 

3); Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 4, 3); Gold Key 

Society 4, 3, 2 ( Keyholder 4); CD. Instructor 3; 

Freshman Orientation 4, 3. 2 (Chairman 4). 

GEORGE R. HARVEY 

7 78 Gardner St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 
3); German Academy 4; Cosmos 4 (Chemistry Editor); 
Section Representative 1; Track 2, 1; Dean's List; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 

CHARLES WILLIAM HAYDEN 

17 Richfield Rd., West Newton, Mass. 

AB English — Radio Club 3, 2, 1; Camera Club 2, 

1; Mendel Club 3. 2, 1. 

GERARD JOSEPH HAYES 

36 Risley Rd.. Brookline, Mass. 

A B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; CD. 
Instructor 4, 3. 2, I (Director 4); Aquinas Circle 4; 
Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Sub Turri (Senior Editor) 4; 
Intramurals 4 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

DANIEL J. HEAFEY, JR. 

741 East Broad war. South Boston, Mass. 
BS Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 
2; German Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 
4, 1. 

ALBERT F. HEALEY 

64 Victoria St., Somervtlle, Mass. 

B.S. Psychology — Cross and Crown 4; Cosmos 4, 3 
(Associate Editor 4); Psychology Club 4, 3. 2; Fresh- 
man Orientation 3; Dean's List. 



THOMAS F. HERLIHY, JR. 

19 Hollis St.. Cambridge. Mass. 

A B Pre-Medical — Gold Key Society 1 ; German Acad- 
emy 1; Mendel Club 4. 3, 2, 1; Radio Club 3, 2; Cadet 
Officers' Club 4, 3; Drill Team 1; Young Democrats 
Club 2. 
HANS J. HERMANS 

L.iuJhnis Briei-enK.it. Curacao, N.W.I. 

B.S. Chemistry — Alpha Sigma Nu 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkert Society 4. 3, 2, 1; Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Dramatic Society 4, 3, 2; Track Team 1. 

JOHN CHARLES HERZOG 

8 Glengarry Rd.. Winchester, Mass. 

A.B. History and Government — Intramurals 4, 1. 

JOHN D. HICKEY 

51 Salisbury Rd., Newton. Mass. , 

B S. History and Government — Cadet Officers Clurj 
4. 3; Historical Society 4. 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Dean's List. 



PETER D. HICKEY 

Brook Lane. Great Barnnton. Mass. 
B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2. 

EDWARD R. HUGHES, JR. 

11 Elizabeth St., Cumberland, R.l. 

A.B. History — Aquinas Circle -i; Glee Club 3, 2, 
Young Democrats Club 1; Sub Turn 4; Sophomore Prom 
Committee 2. 

EDWARD A. HUTCHINSON, III 

238 Savin Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Band 3; 

Dean's List; Intramurals 1. 

RUSSELL HENRY HUTCHINSON 

238 Savin Hill Are.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History — Public Speaking Club 4; Sailing Club 4. 

THOMAS A. HUTCHINSON, JR. 

16 Delano Ave.. Revere. Mass. 

B S Government — Bellarmine Law and Government 

Academy 4; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Drill Team 2. 

ALBERT L. HYLAND, JR. 

it) Whittier Rd.. Medford, Mass. , 

BS Physics — Cross and Crown 4; Gold Key Society 4, 

3, 2 (Keyholder 4, 3. Treasurer 4); Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 

3 (Treasurer 4); Physics Club 4. 3 (Treasurer 4); 
American Institute of Physics 2, 1; Section Representative 
2- Freshman Orientation 3; Commencement Committee 
Co-Chairman 3; Junior Week; Dean's List; Intramurals 

4, 2, 1. 

N. GARY JAMIESON 

79 Park PL, Winsted, Conn. 

BS Biology — Mendel Club 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 

4, 3; Connecticut Club 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JOEL W. JANSKY 

4 J 3 Beacon St.. Boston. Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3. 2, 1 (Vice President 
3); Marquette Debating Society 2; Dean's List; Intra- 
murals 3,2. 

PAUL F. JUDGE 

377 Manet Are.. Quincy. Mass. . 

B.S. History and Government — Cross and Crown 4; Phi 
Alpha Theta 4 (Secretary); Section Representative 3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 2, 1; Historical Society 
4 3; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; 
Junior Week Committee 3; Freshman Orientation 4; 
Dean's List. 

J. VINCENT KANE, JR. 

13 Saint James Ave.. Westfield, Mass. 
B S. Chemistry — Mendel Club 4; Chemical Society 4, 
3, 2, 1; American Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Glee Club 4, 3; Western Massachusetts Club 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Treasurer 3, 2; President 4); Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES FRANCIS KEANEY 
581 East 8th St., South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Public Speak- 
ing Club 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; Fresh- 
man Orientation 4; Senior Pops Committee; Track 4, 3, 
2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 



MICHAEL JOHN KEARNEY 

63 Wyman St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 3, 2; Blessed 

Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2, 1; German Club 3, 2. 

ROBERT A. KEATING 

47 Dtinboy St., Brighton, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Sophomore Class President (Class of 
1959); Dean's Senate 2 (Secretary-Treasurer); Class 
Council 2 (Chairman); Sub Turri 4 (Activities Editor, 
Social Chairman); Public Speaking Club 2; Intramurals 



JOHN P. KEEGAN 

402 Ashmoni St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 3; 
American Institute of Physics 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

EDWARD P. KELLEHER, JR. 
115 Park St.. Braintree, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; American 
Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES J. KELLEHER 

64 Lake St.. Hudson, Mass. 
B.S. Biology. 

MICHAEL JOSEPH KELLEY 

2 Westwood Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government. 

RICHARD D. KELLEY 

810 Belmont St., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Economics 

Academy 4; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



THOMAS L. KELLY 

41 Thompson Lane. Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Ski Team 4, 3; 
Hockey 4, 3; Commencement Week Committee 3; Dean's 
als4, 3, 2, 1. 



THOMAS ALBERT KEOUGH 

Irving St., Millis, Mass. 

B.S. History — Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4; Young Democrats Club 4, 3; Historical Society 
4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT S. LABOUNTY 

34 Barnes St., Pall River, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology. 

RONALD J. LAMB 

J 7 Usher Rd., W. Medford, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Sophomore Section Representative; 

Varsity Baseball 2; Economics Academy 3; Intramurals 

4, 3. 2. 

CHARLES A. LANE 

321 Spring St., Portland, Me. 

A.B. English — Maine Club 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 

PHILIP KEVIN LANGAN 

235 Park St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. English — Gold Key Society 2, 1; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2, 1; Writer's Workshop 3; Heights 4, 
" 2, 1 (Sports Editor 4, 3); Sub Turri 4 (Sports 



Edil 



DAVID C. LANGZETTEL 

61 Davis St., South Portland, Me. 
B.S. English. 

ANDRE J. LEBLANC 

11 Francis St.. Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers' 

Club 4, 3. 

LEONARD PAUL LECLERC 

60 Coblirn St., Framingham, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4; Camera Club 3; Public 

Speaking Club 4; Senior Week 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 

PETER K. LENTINI 

8 Gladstone St., East Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Freshman Orientation 
Committee 3. 

FRANCIS T. LEONARD 

1 5 Laurel PL, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

B.S. History and Government — Gold Key Society 4, 3 
(Keyholder 4); Section Representative 2; WBCB 4, 3; 
New York Club 3, 2, 1; Freshmen Prom Committee 1; 
Senior Week (Chairman Pops Committee). 

JAMES LIANOS 

2868 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2 (Vice 
President 4); Rod and Gun Club 4; Maine Club 4; 
Section Representative 1; Dean's List. 

JEFFREY A. LINEHAN 

1 5 Griswold St. , Meriden, Conn. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Blessed Olivet 
Plunkett Society 4; Baseball Team 2, 1; Football Team 
4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



GEORGE I. LITMAN 

57 Addison St., Chelsea, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Cross and Crown 4; Alpha Sigma Nu 4; 
Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3); The Scope 3, 
2, 1; Cosmos 4 (Biology Editor 4); Band 4, 3, 2 
(Treasurer 4); Section Representative 2; Dean's List. 



ROBERT E. LOONEY 

703 Revere Beach Pkwy., Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Sigma Pi Sigma 
4; American Institute of Physics 2, 1; Dean's List; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOSEPH B. LUKAS, JR. 

77 Thornton Rd., Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Phi Alpha Theta 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4, 2; Public Speaking Club 4, 3, 2; Fteshman Orien- 
tation 3; C. D. Instructor 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 

RICHARD GUY LUONGO 

17 Vtnal St., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 

4, 3, 2. 1. 



JOHN J. LYNCH 

.S' Winter St., Fitchburg, Mass, 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Cadet 

Officers' Club 4, 3; Western Massachusetts Club 4, 3, 2; 

Finance Club 3, 2; Section Representative 4; Intramurals 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS A. MacLEAN 

U6 Bellevue St.. Lowell, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); 

Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



WILLIAM H. MAHER 

36 Wood Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 2. 

WALTER J. MAHONEY 

582 Concord St., Framingham, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Phi Alpha Theta 4; Economics Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; French Academy 2; Writer's Workshop 1; 
Dean's List. 

JAMES C. MALGER 

22 Stanton St., Cochituate, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2. 

RICHARD D. MALONEY 

12 Hunnewell Ave., Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Heights 4, 3, 2; Section Representa- 
tive 2; WBCB 4; Freshman Basketball 1; Varsity Base- 
ball 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RAYMOND T. MANCINI 

3S'6 Mesh.iutiait Valley Pkwy., Cranston, R. I. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Rhode 

Island Club 4; Senior Week 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 

FRANCIS P. MANNING 

1053 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 



JAMES M. MANNING 

351 Centre St., Dorchester 22, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry. 

PETER J. MANNING 

37 Brunswick Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, S, 2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 1; Golf Team 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3. 2, 1. 

JOHN ROBERT MARCACCIO 

71 Betsey Williams Dr., Providence, R. 1. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Rhode Island 

Club 4, 3 (President 4, 3); Dean's List. 

ROBERT G. MARCOTULLIO 

344 Manor Rd., Pelham, N. Y. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; New York Club 
4, 3, 2, I; Sub Turri 4; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

IRVING M. MARCUS 

1 05 Hichborn St.. Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 

4, 3; Glee Club 1; Dean's List; Inttamurals 4, 3, 2, I. 

JOSEPH S. MAROUN 

20 Agnes Terr., Melhuen, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Psychology Club 

4, 3; Sodality 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES F. MARTIN. JR. 

24 Atkins St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 2; Intramurals 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

LOUIS PAUL MASSARO, JR. 

lit Poole St., Woburn, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Italian Academy 4, 3, 
2 (Treasurer 4); Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN LAWRENCE MATTHEWS 

239 River St., W. Newton, Mass. 

A.B. Philosophy — American Institute of Physics 2, 1; 
Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3; Aquinas Circle 4, 3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Young Demo- 
crats Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4); Dean's List; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS J. MAY 

155 Davis Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

B.S. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treas- 
urer 4); Cosmos 4, 3 (Associate Editor); Section Repre- 
sentative 2; Sub Turri 3; Freshman Orientation 4, 3; 
Dean's List; In 



MICHAEL S. MAZVA 

7330 So. Mapleu-ood Ave., Chicago, III. 

BS. English — Gold Key Society 4, 3 (Keyholder 4, 

3) ; Psychology Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2; WBCB 3. 

MONTROSE PALLEN McARDLE, IV 

133 Great Rd., Bedford, Mass. 

B.S. Economics. 

RONALD P. MCCAFFREY 

36 East St., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Public 

Speaking Club 3; Cosmos 4, 3 (Associate Editor 4); 

Sub Turri 4; Dean's List; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

HENRY W. MCCARTHY 

933 Greendale Ave., Needham, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Young 

Democrats Club 2; Intramurals 3, 2, I. 



THOMAS J. McCARVILLE 

165 Main St., West Newbury. Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 
2, 1 (Representative 3); Football Manager 2; Basketball 
Manager 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 

THOMAS GAMES DOMONIC McCUE 

1617 Main St., East Hartford, Conn. 

B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3, 2; Connecticut Club 4; 
Section Representative 4. 



349 



ANDREW KENT McCUSKER 

10 Orchard Ave., Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. English — English Academy 4 (Secretary); The 

Stylus 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES P. McDEVITT 

355 Irving St., Framiagham, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and 

Government Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3. 

JOHN FRANCIS McDONALD 

15 Bardwell St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 

2, 1; German Club 2, 1; Football Manager 4, 3, 2, 1; 

Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

DON PATRICK McDONOUGH 

14 John St., Chelsea 50, Mass. 
B.S. History and Goven 



FREDERICK W. McGARRAH 

36 Ausonia Rd., West Roxbnry. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Rod and Gun Club 3; Eo 

Academy 4, 3; Chess Club 2, 1; Freshman Orientation 

4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD A. McKENNA 

10 Cambria Rd., West Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3; Chemical 

Society 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT ARTHUR McKENNEY 

92 Westchester Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
A.B. History — Section Representative 1 ; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2, 1; Historical Society 4, 3; Sodality 
3, 2, 1; Mendel Club 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN S. MCLAUGHLIN 

21 Belvoir Rd., Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Biology. 

ALLAN T. MCLEAN 

?0 Washburn St., Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — American Institute of Physics 2, 1; 
Economics Academy 4, 3; Glee Club 4, 3; Junior Week 
3; Section Representative 4; Commencement Week 4; 
Co-Chairman Dartmouth Dance 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES JUDE McMANN 

26 Logan Way, South Boston, Mass. 

A.B. History and Government — Stylus 4 ( Associate 

Editor 4) ; Historical Society 4, 3. 

JOHN J. McMANUS 

59 Wyman St., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

FREDERICK V. McMENIMEN, JR. 

45 Wellesley Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — C. D. Instructor 4, 3; 

Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN R. McNEALY 

1399 North Shore Rd., Revere, Mass. 
A.B. Modern Language — Debating Society 4, 3, 2, 1 
(President 4); Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Cadet Officers' 
Club 3; Heights 4, 3; Section Representative 2; Dramatic 
Society 4, 3. 

DANIEL J. McPHEE 

12 Warren Sq., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government. 

HENRY L. McQUEENEY, JR. 

6 Regan Rd.. Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 
4); Scope 3, 2; Section Representative 4, 2, 1; Dean's 
List; Intramurals 2, 1. 

KEVIN L. McTEAGUE 

21 Beech St., Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 3; Drill Team 2, 

I; In 



WILLIAM F. MICHAUD 

Harding Rd.. Wakefield, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Law and 

Government Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 1. 

ANTHONY JOSEPH MILANO 

16 Wellsmere Terr., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. History — Historical Society 4, 3; Dean's List. 

JAMES E. MILLER 

82 Wilbington Rd., Newlonville, Mass. 
B.S. Biology. 

JOHN F. MILLER, JR. 

106 Highland Ave., Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Psychology — Cross and Crown 4; Ricci Mathe- 
matics Academy 3; Psychology Club 4, 3, 2 (President 
4); Rod and Gun Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 3, 
President 4); Freshman Orientation 3; Dean's List; 
Intramurals 2, 1. 

PHILIP A. MINICHIELLO 

7 Morningside Rd., Wakefield, Mass. 
B.S. Natural Science. 

BRIAN J. MORAN 

J-f6 P,//// Revere Rd., Needham Heights, Mass. 
A.B. Economics — Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 3; Cross and 
Crown (Marshal 4); Heights 4, 3, 2, 1 (Feature Editor 
3, 2; Editor in Chief 4); N.F.C.C.S. 3, 2, 1 (Chairman 
3); Debating Society 3, 2, I (Vice Presidenr 1, Presi- 
dent 2 ) ; Dean's List. 

MICHAEL FRANCIS MORELLI 

143 Pearl St.. Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Section Representative 2, 1; Junior 

Class Vice President. 

FRANCIS MORETTI 

212 Harvard St., Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Class Represe 



Football 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOSEPH L. MORGAN 

90 Jadson St., Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; I, 



350 



PII'RRE J. MORIN 

629 Blais St.. Berlin. N. H. 

A.B. History and Government — Maine < 

Academy 3, 2; Section Representative 

ROBERT M. MORONEY 

61 Mt. Ida Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. English. 

STEPHEN GERALD MORRISON, JR. 

37.5 Medford St., Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics 
1; Section Representative 3; In 



ROBERT JOSEPH MORRISSEY 

228 Sycamore St., Water/own, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Omicron Chi Epsilon 4; Phi Alph: 
Theta 4; Economics Academy 4, 3, 2 (President 4) 
Toastmaster's Circle 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Gov 
: Academy 4; American Institute of Physics 1 

Circle 4; Blessed Olive "" 
al Society 3, 2; Freshrr 
als 4, 3, 2, I; Dean's List 



Aquin 



Plunkett Society 1; 
Orientation 4, 3; 



PHILIP E. MULLANE, JR. 

94 Moore St., Lowell, Mass. 
B.S. Biology. 

KEVIN THOMAS MULLEN 

493 Columbia Rd,, Dorchester, M 
A.B. Modern Language — Russia 
Academy 3; Chess Club 4, 3. 

PAUL EDWARD MUNSEY 

139 East Cottage St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. History — Gold Key Society 2; Heights 4, 3, 2; 
Junior Week 3; WBCB -l, 3; Historical 'Society 4, 3; 
als 4, 3, 2, I. 



Academy 4; Spanish 



RICHARD HARLEY MURCH 

5 Seymour St., Roslindale, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Classics 
Academy 2, 1; Public Speaking Club 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4. 

BARRY JOSEPH MURPHY 

62 Thomas St., Belmont, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Senior Dance Commit- 
tee 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES JOSEPH MURPHY, JR. 

69 Otis St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Marhematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3; 
Football 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement Week Committee 3; 
Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 2, 1. 



RICHARD F. MURPHY 

84 Berkshire Rd., Newtonville, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Dean's List. 

ROBERT EDWARD MURPHY 

11 Garden St., Wobum, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology — Mendel Club 2, 1; Sociology Club 4, 

3; Young Democrats Club 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOSEPH A. MURRAY, JR. 

299 School St., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Rifle Team 3, 2, 1; 

Rod and Gun Club 2, 1; Dean's List. 

JOSEPH E. NADEAU 

35 Marathon St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 2, 
1; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1 
( Commander 4 ) ; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



PAUL LAWRENCE NEARY 

48 Sherwood- St., Roslindale, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Public 

Speaking Club 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

ROBERT NICHOLS 

1015 Beverly Dr., Florence, S. C. 
B.S. Psychology. 

JOHN DEBAISIEUX NICKROSZ 

84 Worthen St., Lowell, Mass. 

A.B. Latin and French — French Academy 2. 

KEVIN FRANCIS O'BRIEN 

35 Conwell Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Band 4, 3, 2, 

1; Rod and Gun Club 4; Junior Show. 

MICHAEL J. O'CONNOR 

27 Fairbanks Ave.. Wellesley Hills. Mass. 

B.S. English — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2; 

Public Speaking Club 4, 3. 

ROBERT C. O'LEARY 

7 Brook Rd,, Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Cross and Crown 4 (Marshal 4); 
Alpha Sigma Nu 4 (Vice President 4); President of the 
Senior Class; Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3 (Vice President 
4, 3); Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2; Section Representative 3, 
2, 1; Freshman Orientation Committee 4, 3; Varsity 
Track 4, 3, 2 (Captain — Cross Country 4); Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

CHARLES J. O'MALLEY 

406 Fuller St., West Newton, Mass. 

A.B. English — Debating Society 2, 1; Dean's List. 

FREDERICK M. O'NEILL 

74 Meagher Ave., Milton, Mass, 

B.S. Economics — Gold Key Society 4, 3; Economics 
Academy 2, 3, 4 (Secretary 4); Mendel Club 1; Mar- 
keting Club 4; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 
-i; Senior Ball ( Co-Chairman) ; Freshman Orientation 4; 
Dean's List; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM D. O'REILLY 

1142 Harrison Ave., Roxbnry, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Physics Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT F. O'TOOLE 

593 Gallevan Blvd., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; Vice 
Presidenr Junior Class; Vice President Senior Class; 
Senior Class Council; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 



TIMOTHY FRANCIS PARSONS 

71 Highland Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — American Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 

3, 2, 1; Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 4, 3 ) ; 
Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

PAUL H. PAYSON 

34 Channing St., Wollaston, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4; Physics Club 4, 3; 

Dean's Lisr; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

GERARD A. PELLETIER 

5 Greenledge St.. Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2. 

STANFORD S. PELOSI, JR. 

589 Lincoln Ave., Sangns, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4. 3, 2, 1; American 

Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers' Club 

4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

DOMENIC F. PERRIELLO 

44 Otis St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. History — Russian Academy 4; Historical Society 4; 

Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; Dean's List 

CHARLES E. PETRIE 

26 Fairview St., Dedham., Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2; Commencement Ball Committee 4; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

HAI BA PHO 

12 Lexington Terr., Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government. 

BERNARD LEO PLANSKY 

287 Minot St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Physics — Cross and Crown 4; Gold Key Sociery 

4, 3, 2 (Key Holder 4, 3); Campus Council 4; Sigma 

Pi Sigma 4, 3 (Social Chairman 4); Drill Team 4 3 

2, 1; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Physics Club 4, 3, 2, 1; 

Junior Prom Committee 3; Sophomore Prom Committee 

2; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ZYGMUNT W. POCZATEK 

2112 Acushnet Ave., New Bedford, Mass. 
B.S. Physics — Sigma Pi Sigma 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Mendel Club 4; Gold Key Society 2; Young 
Democrats Club 4; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDMUND P. PULTINAS, JR. 

701 Washington Ave., Waterbury, Conn, 
B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; American 
Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Officers' 
Club 4, 3; Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 

F. PAUL QUATROMONI 

120 T backer St., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Sciences — Mendel Club 1; Cadet Officers' 

Club 4, 3; Band 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD J. QUINN 

19 Forest Hills St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. History — Track 4, 3, 2, 1 (Captain 4); Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1; Freshman Orientation Committee 4, 3. 
JOSEPH V. RAJUNAS 
/ 1 Glade Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; American 
Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, I; Intramurals 4, 3. 
FREDERICK L. RANDALL 
67 Brookledge St., Roxbnry, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Sciences — Mendel Club 4. 3; Drill Team 
2, 1; Freshman Orientation 4, 3; Dean's List; liur.iniur.ils 
4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT H. REAGAN 

12 Oak Rd., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. History — Track Team 3, 2, 1; Cross Country Team 
3; World Relations League 4; Bellarmine Law and Gov- 
ernment Academy 4; Historical Society 3. 
JAMES A. REILLY 
14 Arboruay. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Cross and Crown 4; WBCB 4, 3; 
Economics Academy 3; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Gold Key 
Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Commencement Com- 
mittee 3; Dean's List. 

SALVATORE T. REINA 

140 Bennington St., East Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 3; Italian 

Academy 3; Physics Club 1; Dean's List. 

JOSEPH N. RESHA, JR. 

24 Oak St., Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Sciences — Gold Key Society 4, 3; Mendel 

Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

PAUL ALVIN RICCI 

94 Loader's Lane, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet 

Officers' Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 

THOMAS J. RIDDELL 

67 Thomas Dr., Manchester, Conn. 
B.S. Sociology. 

RICHARD F. RILEY 

J 264 Elmwood Ave., Providence. R. I. 

B.S. Sociology — Section Represenrative 2; Rhode Island 

Club 4, 3; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT H. RIORDON 

50 Upland Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 

Economics Academy 4. 

RAYMOND N. RIOUX 

97 Gifford St., Falmouth, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Gold Key Society 2; Mendel Club 4 3 

2, 1; Junior Show 3. 

WILLIAM L. RIVERS 

74 May St., Sa/em, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; American 

Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 



WILLIAM W. ROBERTS 

52 Valley Rd., Clifton. N. J. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 2, 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Public Speaking Club 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

ROBERT M. ROBICHEAU 

37 Dix St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Psychol- 
ogy Club 4; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; 
" ', 2, 1. 



BURTON ROBINSON 

20 Sbnte Path. Newton Centre, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Sciences — Band 4, 3. 2, 1; Mendel Club 

4, 3; Basketball Manager 1; Dean's List. 

WILLIAM CHARLES ROGERS 

53 Ridgewood St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 2; Foreign Trade 

Club 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 2; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM P. ROHAN 

1836 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Psychology — Cross and Crown 4; Heights 2, 1; 

Cosmos 4; Psychology Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4); 

Dean's List. 

JAMES M. ROMERO 

1 Harvard Ave., Attleboro, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Sodality 1; 

Psychology Club 4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN F. RYAN 

73A Bartlett St., Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

JAMES W. SAVAGE 

91 Clark Rd., Everett, Mass. 
B.S. English. 

WILLIAM ANTHONY SCARING 

4 Brookline Ave.. Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Psychology Club 
4; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; Section 
Representative 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 1. 



WALTER E. SHAUGHNESSY, JR. 

12 Scott St., Woburn. Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Historical Society 4, 3; 
Intramurals 4, 2, 1. 

LOUIS E. SHAW 

26 Burnside Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Economics Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Government and Law Academy 
als 4, 3, 2, I. 



JOSEPH L. SHEA 

2 Arbroth St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

LEO BRIAN SHEA 

11 Orient PL, Melrose, Mass. 

A.B. English — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4. 

RALPH A. SHEA 

45 Kenwood St., Brookline, Mass. 

A.B. Sociology — Psychology Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

WALTER H. SHEA 

97 Allston St., Medford, Mass. 
B.S. History. 

PAUL JOSEPH SHEEDY 

15 Rock Glen Circle, Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sciences — Heights 1; Gold Key 4, 3, 1; 

Psychology Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN FRANCIS SHEEHAN 

41 Auckland St., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. English — Band 4, 3, 2, 1; Film Society 4, 3 (Vice 
Chairman 4, 3); Public Speaking Club 3; French Acad- 
emy 2; Intramurals 1; Dean's List. 

PAUL J. SIVERSTEN 

39 Herman St., Winthrop, Mass. 
A.B. Classics. 

THOMAS D. STANGA 

51 Hemenway St., Boston, Mass. 

A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club 4. 

EDWARD F. STANTON, JR. 

205 South Main St.. Attleboro, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 3, 2 1; Foreign 
Trade Club 4, 3 (Treasurer 4); Senior Week ( Co- 
Chairman Publicity Committee); Young Republican Club 
4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT S. STROKES 

30 Adrian St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 2, 

1; German Academy 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

PHILIP M. SUAREZ 

160 Walnut St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. History — Phi Alpha Theta 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 2; Historical Society 4, 3; 
Dean's List. 



EDWARD F. SULESKY 

23 Upland Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Glee Club 4, 3. 
2; Economics Academy 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Gov- 
ernment Academy 4; Cadet Officers' Club 4. 3; Junior 
Week Committee 3; Freshman Prom Committee 1. 

CORNELIUS FRANCIS SULLIVAN, JR. 

74 Harbor View St., Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Cosmos 4, 

3 (Assistant Editor). 

PHILIP H. SULLIVAN. JR. 

50 Glendale Rd.. Braintree, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Aquinas Circle 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Sociery 4; Cader Officers' Club 4, 3; Economics 
Academy 4, 3; Class Representative 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

DANIEL SWEENEY 

50 School St., Belmont. Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Aquinas Circle 2. 1; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; French 
Club 2; Debating Society 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 

RICHARD D. SWEENEY 

63 Jenkins Ave., Whitman, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4; Public Speaking 
Club 3; Marquette Debating Society 1; Cadet Officers' 
Club 4. 3. 

ANTHONY J. TESTA 

118 Harding St., W. Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3. 2, 1 (Treas- 
urer 3); American Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3; 
Intramurals 4, 3,2,1. 

JOHN J. THEALL 

121 Rock St.. Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Econ 



EDMUND CORNELIUS TOOMEY 

41 M St., South Boston, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; WBCB 4, 3 
(Assistant Station Manager 4); German Academy 4; 
Commencement Committee 3; Class Night Committee 4; 
Dean's List. 

RICHARD E. TORAN 

69 Marshall St., Needham, Mass. 

B.S. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, I. 

FRANCIS E. TORPEY 

84 Prances St., Boston. Mass. 

A.B. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 

1; German Academy 1; Chess Club 3; Intramurals 1. 

MICHAEL R. TRAMONTE 

119 Spring St., Medford, Mass. 

A.B. Sociology — Psychology Club 4; Section Representa- 
tive 4; Dean's List. 

JOSEPH L. TRIBBLE 

128 Rockland Are., Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. English— Scholar of the College 4; Cross and Crown 
(Knight Commander 4); Alpha Sigma Nu 4 (Treas- 
urer); Class President 1; Campus Council (Chairman 1) 
Section Representative 3; Stylus 4, 3, 2, 1 (Senior Edi 
tor 2, Managing Editor 3, Editor 4); Sub Turri 3, 2, 1 
English Academy 4, 3 (President 4); Drill Team 3, 2, 
1; Dean's List. 

JOHN FRANCIS TWEEDIE 

30 Indian Hill Rd.. Arlington. Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2, 1; American 

Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 

2, 1. 

LOUIS PAUL VERDE 

1149 California Rd., Eastchester Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 1; New York Club 4, 

3, 2, 1; Freshman Orientation 3, 2; Sub Turri 4; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2. 1. 

JOSEPH G. M. VIDOLI 

2423 Garden Rd., Maumee, O. 

A.B. History — Cross and Crown 4; Phi Alpha Theta 4; 
Section Representative 2; History Academy 4, 3 (Presi- 
dent 4); Dean's List. 

ROBERT J. VILLIARD 

148 Trent St.. Woonsocket, R. I. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RUDOLPH VON BURG 

26 South View Ct.. Manhasset, N. Y. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Basketball 3, 2, 

1; Intramurals 1. 



JOSEPH J. WALKER, JR. 

1042 Audubon Rd., Grosse Pointe Park, Mich. 
B.S. Economics — Cross and Crown 4; Gold Key Society 
4. 3 (Keyholder 4) ; Phi Alpha Theta 4; Delta Sigma Pi 
4, 3; Section Representative 1; Economics Academy 4, 3; 
Foreign Trade Club 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Public Speaking 
Club 4, 3 (.Secretary 4). 

PAUL R. WALKER 

12 Beacon St., Biddeford, Me, 

B.S. English — Maine Club 4, 3, 2, I; Intramurals 4, 

3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD D. WALLACE 

256 Purchase St., Milford. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Sodality of Our Lady 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Glee 
Club 4, 3. 

JAMES P. WALSH, JR. 

56 Bontwell St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — French Academy 3, 2; Economics 
Academy 4, 3, 2; WBCB 4, 3 (Librarian 4); Orientation 
Program 4; Commencement Ball Committee 4. 

MICHAEL F. WALSH 

23 Mt. Vernon St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Marquette Debating 

Society 1; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; 

Intramurals. 

JAMES E. WARD 

21 Robert Ford Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. English — Section Representative 1. 

MOSES PAUL WARD 

10 Milford St.. Boston, Mass. 

A.B. Psychology — Psychology Club 4, 3. 

DONALD JAMES WATT 

11 Stevens St.. Maiden. Mass. 

B S. English — English Academy 4 (Treasurer 4) ; Writers 
Workshop 2; Intramurals 2, 1; Dean's List. 

DAVID A. WHITE 

W Frostholm Dr., Rochester. N. Y. 

B.S. Economics — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; Sub Turri 

4; Varsity Baseball 3, 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

LOUIS J. WHITE 

486 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Bellarmine Law and 

Government Academy 4, 3. 

JAMES WHITING 

65 Sutherland Rd.. Brookline, Mass. 

A.B. Pre-Medical — Stylus 4, 3, 2, 1 (Assistant Editor 

4); Writer's Workshop 4, 3; Mendel Club 4, 3, 1. 

FREDERICK C. WILLIAMS 

29 Ashcroft St.. Jamaica Plain. Mass. 
B.S. Physics. 

ROBERT L. WINSTON 

95 Quincy Ave., Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3. 2; Public 
Speaking Club 3; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

EDWARD A. WLODARCZYK, JR. 

7745 S. Sawyer Ave., Chicago. 111. 

B.S. Economics — Aquinas Circle 4, 3; Freshman On 

tation 4, 3; Dormitory Council 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2 



JOHN A. WALGREEN 
230 Wild-wood Ave., Braintree, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3; Aquinas 
Circle 4; Economics Academy 4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 
4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; American Insti- 
tute of Physics 2; Dean's List. 



1. 

WALTER E. WOLKOWICH 

105 Vine St., Lynn. Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemical Society 4, 3, 2. 1; American 

Chemical Society Affiliate 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4 3 

2, 1. 

DAVID H. WRING 

1 1 Maple Terr., Three Rivers, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology — Gold Key Society 4, 3; Western Massa- 
chusetts Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer 1); French Club 1; 
Section Representative 1; Baseball 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 

CHARLES MATTHEW WUJCIK 

30 Giles St., Waterbury, Conn. 

B.S. Natural Science — Mendel Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Con- 
necticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 3, President 4); 
Sub Turri 4; Freshman Orientation 4, 3. 2; Cheerleader 
4, 3 (Captain 4) . 

ROBERT P. YOCCO 

/ 65 Ferncroft Rd. . Milton, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Band 4, 3 2 1: French 

Club 4, 3 (Vice President 4). 

RICHARD C. ZILINSKI 

.50-06 44th St., Woodside, N. Y. 

B.S. Economics — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2 (Key Holder 

4, 3); Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2; Economics Academy 4. 

3, 2; Sub Turri 4. 

EDWARD J. ZILONIS 

-t9 Buttonwood St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Modern Languages — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 

4, 3, 2, 1; German Academy 3, 2; Ski Club 4; Foreign 
Relations Club 2. 



School of Education 



GERALDYNE M. AMORE 

506 Webster St., Marshfield, Mass. 

B.S. French — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Communion Breakfast 
Committee 4, 3 ( Co-Chairman 4); Freshman Orientation 
Committee 3,2; French Club 4. 

LOUISE AUBUCHON 

105 Pratt Rd., Fitchburg, Mass. 

B.S. History — French Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; Marquette 
Debating Club 1; Mendel Club 1; Radio Club 3; Sailing 
Club 4. 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Sub Turri 4; Senior Week 
4; Junior Week 3. 



KATHLEEN M. BAILEY 

484 Green St., Weymouth, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
2, I; St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2, I (Treasurer 3); 
Educational Review 3; Commencement Committee 3; 
Pops Committee 4; Junior Week Committee 3; Dean's 



ROSEMARY BEAGAN 

49 Cleveland Ave., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. English — Sodality 4, 3, -2, 1; Dean's List 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JEAN M. BELVAL 

Beebe Rd., Norwich, Mass. 
B.S. History. 



PAMELA R. BERNARDINI 

51 Museum St., Cambridge. Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Mendel Club 3, 2; Kircher Science Club 
4, 3, 2, 1; Sodality 4; W.R.A. 4. 3. 2, 1; Junior Week 
Pops Committee 3. 



351 



PATRICIA A. BERRY 

80 Park St., Medjord. Mais. 

BS Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4, 3; German 

Club 4, 3 (Secretary 4); W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class 

Skits 4, 3. 

MARYANN BERTOLAMI 

18 Chisbolm St., Everett. Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 4, 

3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Women's Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; 

junior Week Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 3. 

ELIZABETH M. BOOTH 

36 Ronaele Rd., W. Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 4. 

3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Show Committee 3; Inter 

Class Skits 3, 2. 

ANDREA BOYADGIS 

106 Nichols St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 4, 

3; Section Representative 1; W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Junior 

Week Committee 3; Senior Class Day Committee 3; 

Inter Class Skits 3. 

LOUISE B. BOYLE 

38 Walter St., Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Alpha and Omega 4; Pope 

Pius XII Academy 4. 3; Sailing Club 3, 2; Connecticut 

Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Sociery 4; 

W.R.A 4, 3, 2, 1; Communion Breakfast Committee 

4; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Junior Show 3. 

MARY P. BROWN 

63 Beachview Ave., Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. English — Alpha and Omega 4; Writers Club 2; 
Film Society 4, 3; French Academy 3, 2; English Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Blessed Richard Gwynn Society 3, 2; Intet 
Class Skit 4, 3. 
MARY-ELLIN BROWNE 
799 Hampton Rd.. Wood mere, N. Y. 
B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2, 1; New York Club 4, 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3 

2. 1; Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Rifle Club 4, 3, 2, 1 
Dormitory Council 3; Commencement Committee 4 
Freshman Orientation Committee 3; Junior Week Com- 
mittee 3; Junior Show 3. 

PETER PAUL BUDRYK 
505 Main St., Medford. Mass. 
B.S. English — Football 2, 1. 

MARY F. BYRNE 

22 Dunster Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 4, 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Prom Committee 

3; Commencement Ball Committee 4; Inter Class Skits 

4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Show 3. 

PAUL E. BYRON 

i9 Linden St.. Whitman, Mass. 

B.S. History — Historical Society 4; Class Skits 4; Intra- 

murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDITH CACKOWSKI 

723 Core Rd., Stamford, Conn. 

B.S. French — Vice President Senior Class; Secretary 

Sophomore Class; Class Council 4, 2 (Secretary 2); 

Alpha and Omega 4 ( Secretaty-Treasurer ) ; Freshmen 

Orientation 3, 2; French Academy 3. 2; Connecticut Club 

4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3, 2); Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 

PATRICIA A. CARTY 

16 St. Peter St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Alpha and Omega 4; German Club 
4. 3; Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 4); Psy- 
chology Club 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class Skits 
4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Show 3. 

PETER F. CLARK 

5 5 Halifax St.. Jamaica Plain. Mass. 

B.S. History — Inter Class Skits 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT W. CLARKE 

58 Mount Vernon Rd. East, East Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. English. 

JANET A. COLEMAN 

300 Charles St.. Maiden. Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 
2 (Treasurer 4, 3); German Academy 3. 2; Psychology 
Club 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class Skits 4, 3. 

FAITH ANNE CORCORAN 

79 Cedarwood Ave.. Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Elementaty Education — Psychology Club 4, 3, 2; 

Dramatic Society 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 

3. 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Senior Dinner Dance 4 
( Co-Cha 



BRENDA M. CROWLEY 

/ Annapolis St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. English — Senior Class Council (Secretary 4); 
Heights 4, 3; Dramatic Society 4. 3 (Secretary 4 ) ; B. C. 
Film Society 4, 3; Writers Club 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
N.F.C.C.S. 3; Orientation Committee 3, 2 (Chairman 
3); Prom Committee 2; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1. 

MARY E. CROWLEY 

91 Everett St.. Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 2, 1; Rifle Team 4, 3; W.R.A. 4. 3, 2, 1; 
Sophomore Prom Committee; Junior Week; Commence- 
ment Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 1. 

MARY M. CYR 

30 Kensington St.. Newtonville, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 

4, 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2; Dean's List 3, 2, 1. 

DOROTHY DAGOSTINO 

30 Warren St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Italian Academy 3; Rifle 
Club 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Week 3; Inter Class 
Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Inttamurals 3, 2. 

MAURICE JOSEPH DALY 

22 Rogers St.,Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. English — Alpha and Omega 4 (President 4); 
Debating Society 1; English Academy 4; Fteshman 
Orientation 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 



ROSANNA F. DAWSON 

41 William St., Portland, Maine 
B.S. Elementary Education — Sodality 3, 2, 1; Dr; 
Society 3; French Academy 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 3; Maine Club 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 4, 3, 2); 
Senior Week 4; Inter Class Skits 3; Junior Show 3. 

BETTY ANN DEAN 

2-i Elm St.. Salisburg, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education. 

MARY ELAINE DEFINA 

88 Deerfteld Rd., Needham, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2; 

Italian Academy 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, I; Dean's List. 

RICHARD D. DE LELLO 

963 Bine Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Social Studies — Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 2, 1; Italian Academy 2; Heights 2, 1; 
Debating Society 2, 1; Cheetleader 2, 1; Intiamural 
4. 3, 2, 1. 

RAMON de ROSAS 

7 Memorial Way, Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. English — Intramurals 3, 2. 

LAWRENCE L. DONOVAN 

3t2 Huron Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. History. 

ELEANOR C. DOWNEY 

933 Metropolitan Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2; Ger- 
man Academy 4, 3, 2 (Vice President 4); Young 
Republicans Club Secretary 3; W.R.A. 4, 3. 2, 1; 
Junior Week. 

MARGARET A. DOYLE 

1960 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education — Junior Class Secretary 3; 
W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Dance Committee 3; Sopho- 
more Prom Committee 2; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CAROLYN FRANCES DUFFY 

IB Wilbur St.. Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 3; 
Dramatic Society 4, 3, 2 (Vice President 4); W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class Skits 3. 

JAMES F. DUFFY 

26 Bigelow Rd., Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. History. 

SHEILA A. DUFFY 

83 Colonial Ave.. Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education. 

PRISCILLA A. DURANT 

686 Broad St., E. Weymouth, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2; 
Italian Academy 3, 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Week; 
Senior Week. 

ELAINE F. DUTILLY 

27 Morse St., Natick, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 3; 
Women's Glee Club 4, 3, 2 (Vice President 3); 
Dean's List. 

LORRAINE A. ESTERHILL 

33 Everett Ave., Winchester, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2; 
Women's Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Librarian 2, President 
3); W.R.A. 4, 3. 2, 1; Junior Week Committee 3; 
Junior Show 3; Dean's list. 

JAMES E. FALLON 

42 Wood St., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. History — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

PHILIP J. FASANO 

4 Melbourne St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. French — Class treasurer 2; French Club 3, 2; 

Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 

FRANCIS X. FOLEY 

1429 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Chemistry — Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

MAUREEN C. FOLEY 

111 Milton Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

B.S. Histoty and Governmenr — Writers Club 2; Heights 
1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 (Treasurer); Prom Committee 4, 
2; Inter Class Skits 4. 

JOSEPH F. FORD 

22 Wood lawn Cir.. Marsh field, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Section Rep 

Inter Class Skits 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1 



DOLORES A. FRANGIOSO 

133 Savannah Ave.. Mattapan, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Italian Academy 4, 3, 2, 
1 (Secretary 3); W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement 
Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's list 3. 

CARROLL P. GAGNON 

16 Montello St. Ext.. Brockton, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4; Rifle Team 3, 2, 1; 

Freshman Orientation Committee 3; In 



EDWINA CAROLE GARABEDIAN 

; 59 Elm St.. Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. History — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Week 3; 
Freshman Orientation 3, 2; Inter Class Skits 4, 3. 2; 
Dean's List. 

M. ELLEN GARTLAND 

125 Adams St., Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Olivet Plunkett 
Society 4, 3; Psychology Club 4, 3; Junior Prom 
Committee 3; Dean's List. 

WILLIAM W. GENTILE 

11 Marlton Rd., Waltham. Mass. 

B.S. English — Blessed Richard Gwynn Society 2, 1 
(Treasurer 2); Section Representative 1; Inter Class 
Skits 3. 

JOHN J. GORMAN 

9 Plant Ct., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Physics. 



CAROL FRANCES GREEN 

23 Bellingham Ave.. Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Alpha and Omega 4; 
Women's Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1 (Prefect 3); Women's 
Council 4, 3 (Treasurer 3, Vice President 4); Pope Pius 
XII Academy 4, 3; Women's Glee Club 4, 3, 2; Fresh- 
man Prom Committee 1; Inter Class Skits 1; Intramurals 
2, 1; Dean's List. 

JOHN M. HALLORAN 

8 Sterling Sq.. South Boston, Mass. 

B.S. English — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2. 1; Blessed Richard Gwynn Society 
2, I; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 



WILLIAM LEONARD HAMMOND 

37 Chestnut St., Marblehead. Mass. 

B.S. Social Studies — Freshman Orientation 3. 

MARY WALKER HARDIGAN 

46 Grant Are., Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education. 

JOSEPH FRANCIS HARRINGTON, JR. 

70 Nahanton Ave., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Educational Review 
3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3; Inttamurals 3, 2, 1; Freshman 
' .3,2. 



PHILIP J. HIGGINS 

89 White Oak Rd.. West Roxbury. Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Freshman Orientation 2. 



ANN HILFERTY 

125 Walnut St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. English — W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Dramatic Society 3; 

Writer's Workshop 4, 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1. 

MARGARET E. HINCHEY 

54 Jackson Ave., Rutland, Vermont 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Sociery 2, 1; Maine Club 3; Dramatic Society 3, 2, 1; 
Junior Prom Commirtee 3; Orientation Committee 3, 2; 
W.R.A. 3, 2; Dean's List. 

MARY HINES 

7 Bellaire Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. English — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Sec- 
tion Representative 1; French Academy 4, 3, 2 (Secre- 
tary 4, 3); Film Society 4, 3 (Secretary 4, 3); English 
Academy 4, 3; The Heights 1; Sub Turri 4; Senior 
Class Night (Co-Chairman) ; Dean's List. 

PAUL J. HUDON 

121 Gershin Ave., Lowell, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Educational Review 
2; Historical Society 2; Stylus 4, 3 (Senior Editor); 
Freshman Orientation 3; Inter Class Skits 3, 2, 1; 
Dean's List. 

PHYLLIS A. JOY 

51 Riverside St., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Dramatic Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Ski Club 3; Rifle Club 3; 
Freshman Orientation 3; Dean's List. 



PAUL FRANCIS Kl-AVENEY 

82 Perry St.. Brookline. Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Orientation Committee 2; Dean's List. 

EDMUND P. G. KELLEY 

34 Noyes St., Portland, Maine 

B.S. History and Government — Student Senate 3, 2; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Maine Club 3, 2, 
1; The Heights 1; Football Manager 2, 1; Dean's list. 

BRENDA M. KELLY 

99 Loring Rd., Winthrop, Mass. 

B.S. Biology — Kircher Club 2,1; Mendel Club 4, 3; 

W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 3, 2; Dean's List. 

MAUREEN ANNE KEOHANE 
27 Warren St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Alpha and Omega 4; 
Senior Class Treasurer; Student Senate 4, 1 (Vice 
President 1); Pope Pius XII Academy 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunketr Sociery 4; Women's Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; 
N.E.T.P.A. 3; W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Sailing Club 4; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Junior Show 3; Freshman Orien- 
tation 3, 2; Freshman Prom I (Co-Chairman); Inter 
Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

MARGARET EILEEN KUHN 

77 Grafton St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2, 
1 (Vice President 3); Section Representative 3; Educa- 
tional Review 4, 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 (Board Member 
3); Senior Week Pops Committee 4 (Co-Chairman); 
Junior Week Pops Committee 4 (Co-Chairman); Inter 
Class Skits 2; Dean's List. 

JOAN FRANCES LAWRIE 

65 Suffolk Ave.. Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — Alpha and Omega 4; St. 
Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 2); Educational 
Review 4, 3; Women's Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2, 1; Juniot Prom Committee 3; Dean's List 
3, 2, 1. 

PAULINE Y. LeBLANC 

61 Florence Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Women's Sodality 2, 1; 
Pius XII Academy 4; Diamatic Society 1; Sub Turri 4; 
W.R.A. 4. 3. 2, 1 (Secretary 4, 3, 2); Women's Rifle 
Team 4, 3 (Captain 3); Sailing Club 4, 3, 2; Senior 
Dinner-Dance Committee 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Junior Show 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1 (Chairman 
3); Dean's List. 

ROBERT J. LEONARD 

30 Hanson St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Ricci Mathe- 
matics Academy 4, 3, 2; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class 
Skits 3, 1. 

PAUL FREDERICK MacARTHUR 

93 Robinwood Rd.. Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. History — Junior Class Vice President; Campus 
Council 3; Student Senate 3; Freshman Orientation 2; 
Inter Class Skits 3, 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 



352 



Society 4, 3, 



DONNA VIRGINIA MacCHARLES 

1 28 Lowell St., Peabody, Mass. 

B.S. English — Blessed Oliver Plunkect Society 2, 1; 
English Academy 4, 3; Psychology Club 3; The Heights 
1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

MYRNA LOUISE MacFARLANE 

6 Valentine St., Roxbitry, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — Saint Mark's Academy 4 

3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3, 2); Educational Review 4, 3 
Women's Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1 
Senior Prom Committee 4; Junior Prom Committee 3 
Dean's List. 

MARIA M. MALGER 

22 Stanton St.. Cochitnate, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education — D 
2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1. 

HELEN ANN MARIANO 

44 Beechland St.. Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Mathematics Academy 4, 3, 
2, 1; German Academy 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Commence- 
ment Week 3; Junior Show 3; Inter Class Skits 3; 
Dean's List. 
DONNA E. MASON 

11 Orlando Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Junior Class Treasurer 
Junior Class Council (Secretary); Women's Sodality 2 
1; Pope Pius XII Academy 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; W.R.A 

4, 3, 2, 1; Rifle Club 3; Sailing Club 3; Senior Dinner 
Dance Committee 4; Commencement Week 3 (Co- 
Chairman); Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

EDWARD JOSEPH MCCARTHY 

6 Fuller St.. Dorchester. Mass. 

B.S. History — Historical Society 4; Baseball 2; Inter 
Class Skits 3; Intramurals 3, 2. 1. 

LYDIA MARY MCCARTHY 

1}4 Calumet St.. Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2. 1; Women's Glee Club 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 
1; Women's Rifle Club 4, 3; Sub Turri 4, 3; Commence- 
ment Committee 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; Inter 
Class Skits 4, 3. 

RUTH E. MCCARTHY 

80 Hooker Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3. 

FRANCIS F. McCUNE 

7 Marshall St.. Rockport, Mass. 

B.S. History — Track 4, 3, 1; Sodality 4, 3. 

ROSE MARY McDERMOTT 

237 North Main St.. Randolph, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Women's Rifle Team 4, 3; 
Senior Week Committee 3; Junior Show 3. 

GRACE KATHLEEN McGILLIVRAY 

12 Randolph St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementaiy Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Educa- 
tional Journal 3; Sub Turri 4; Senior Dinner-Dance 
Committee 4; Commencement Week 3 (Chairman); 
Junior Week Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 

FLORA MARIE MCLAUGHLIN 

15 Lindon St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 
4, 3 (President 4); Dramatics Society 4, 3, 2; W.R.A. 
4, 3, 2; Commencement Committee t; Inter Class Skits 
3; Dean's List. 

FREDERICK J. MILTON 

6 Albion St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4. 3; Dotmitory Council 
3; Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class Skits 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JEAN T. MOLLOY 

47 Selwyn St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3); Young Democrats Club 
3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Show; Inter Class Skits 
3, 2. 

BRUCE W. MORSE 

19 Grandview Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. History — Freshman Orientation 3; Basketball 1; 

Inter Class Skits 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

KAREN ANN MOYNIHAN 

190 Nanbuc Ave., East Hartford, Conn. 

B.S. Biology — Dean of Women's Council 4 3 2 1 

(Vice President 3, President 4); Mendel Club 4, 3; 

Women's Glee Club I; Connecticut Club 4, 3. 2, 1; 

Education Review 4, 3, 2, (Editor 4); W.R.A. 4, 3, 
2, 1; Commencement Ball Committee 4; Junior Week 

3; Freshman Orientation 4. 3, 2; Inter Class Skits 4, 3 
2; Sailing Club 4. 

DAVID A. NICHOLSON 

985 Walnut St., Newton Highlands, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education — Debating Club I; Inter 
Class Skits 3, 2. 
NORTON C. O'BRIEN 
6 Bertlano Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History — Historical Society 4; Section Represent- 
ative 4, 3; Intramural 3. 2, 1. 
M. NANCY O'CONNELL 
15 Montague St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3; Pope Pius XII Academy 4, 3; Rifle Club 
3; Junior Week Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 1. 



WILLIAM O'CONNOR 

22 Peter Tufts Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Section Represent- 
ative 2. 1; Freshman Orientation Committee 3; Sub 
Turri 4 (Managing Editor); Inter Class Skits 4, 3; 
C.D.I. 2; Dean's List. 

JAMES L. O'HEARN 

74 Anawan Ave.. Roxbnry, Mass. 

B.S. History — Dramatics Society 4, 3. 2, 1 (President 
4); Freshman Orientation 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 
2, I ( Co-Director 3 ) . 

HELEN T. O'MALLEY 

45 Yale Terr., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3. 2, 1; Dramatic Society 1: Pope Pius XII 
Academy 4. 3; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2. 1; Rifle Club 3; Inter 
Class Skits 4, 3. 

ROBERT P. O'REGAN 

5 Avon St., Natick, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; Fresh- 
man Orientation 3; Inter Class Skits 3; Dean's List 3. 

EIIEEN MARIE O'SULLIVAN 

296 Pleasant St.. Portsmouth, N.H. 

B.S. History — Oliver Plunkett Society 3, 2, 1; Maine 
Club 3, 2; Sailing Club 3, 2; W.R.A. 4. 3. 2, 1; 
Heights 1: Freshman Orientation 3, 2; Sub Turri 4; 
Senior Week Committee 3 (Chairman); Junior Week 
Committee 3; Freshman Prom Committee 1. 

SR. MARY THOMAS PAUL (DUBAY) 

863 Central St., Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Edu 



CLAIRE PEDRANTI 

265 Common St.. Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Oliver Plunkett Society 1; 
Italian Academy 3, 2; W.R.A. 4, 3. 2, 1; Junior Week 
Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 

ANTHONY NICHOLAS PENNA 

116 Henry St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. History — Historical Society 4, 3, 2; Inter Class 

Skits 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



MARIE PLliNKETT 

8 Astican Rd., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3. 2, 1 (Vice President 4); Pope Pius XII 
Academy 4, 3; Young Democtats 4, 3; W.R A. 4, 3, 
2. 1; Senior Week Committee 3; Junior Week Com- 
mittee 3. 

MARY A. QUINLAN 

40 Cummings Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Soci- 
ety 4, 3; St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 
2); W.R.A. 4, 3. 2, 1; Educational Review 4, 3; Dra- 
matic Society 3. 2, 1; Senior Week 4 (Co-Chairman) ; 
Junior Week Committee 3; Freshman Orientation 3; 
Inter Class Skits 4. 3; Dean's List. 

MARY C. QUINN 

415 K St.. South Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Italian Academy 3. 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Junior Week Committee 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 

ANNA J. RECUPERO 

11 Ellsworth St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S History — Student Council 1 (Treasuter); Alpha 

and Omega 4; Heights 3, 2; Italian Academy 3; Glee 

Club 4. 3, 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2. 1; Fteshman Orientation 

3; Commencement Committee 3; Senior Week Committee 

4; Junior Week 3; Sophomore Prom Committee; Inter 

Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

JOYCE REGIONE 

26 Parker St.. Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 
4, 3 (Secretary 4); W.R.A. 4. 3; Senior Commencement 
Committee 3; Senior Class Committee 4; Communion 
Breakfast Committee 3 (Co-Chairman); Dean's List. 

FREDERICK MEADE REYNOLDS 

14 Amherest St.. No. Chelmsford, Mass. 

B.S. Mathematics — Kappa Epsilon 4, 3; Ricci Math 

Academy 4, 3. 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

SUSAN RIZZO 
51 Adams St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Psychology Club 3, 2; 
French Club 2; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, I; Junior Week Com- 
mittee 3. 

CHARLES A. ROBINSON 

9 Sable Ave., Dartmouth, Mass. 

B.S. English — Alpha and Omega 4; Alpha Sigma Nu 

4, 3 (Secretary 4, 3); Educational Review 4. i (Features 

Editor 4, 3); Writer's Club 3; Freshman Orientation 3, 

2 (General Chairman 3); Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1. 

DORIS M. ROBINSON 

35 Firth Rd., Roslindale, Mass, 

B.S. Mathematics — Ricci Math Academy 4, 3, 2, 1; 

German Academy 4, 3; Educational Review 4, 3 (News 

Editor 4, 3); W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Inter Class Skits 4, 3. 

JEAN ANNE ROBINSON 

44B Sacramento St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — Saint Mark's Academy 4, 3, 

2, 1; Educational Review 4, 3; W.R.A. 3, 2, 1; Junior 

Week Committee 3; Dean's List. 



JAMES W. RUSSELL 

46 Barley St., Danvers, Mass. 

B.S. English — Class Council 4, 3. 2, 1 (Chairman 2); 
Kappa Epsilon 4. 3; Freshman Orientation 3, 2; Glee 
Club 2, 1; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, I; Class President 
4. 3, 2, 1. 

RITA SARRO 

35 Hope St., Mansfield, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Connecticut Club; WRA 
4, 3 2 1; Senior Week 4; Basketball 1; Inter Class 
Skits 4, 3, 2; Intramural sports 2. 1. 

PATRICIA MARY SASSO 

163 Endicolt St.. Boston, Mass. 

B.S. English — Dramatic Society 4, 3; Section Represent- 
ative 1; Freshman Orientation 3. 2; W R.A 4 3 2 
1; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2, 1 (Director); Dean's List! 
GERALD F. SHEA 
9 A James St., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 4 
(Treasurer); Freshman Orientation 3, 2; Basketball 1- 
Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JANE ANNE SHEA 

30 Surry Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Freshman Secretary 1; 

Pope Pius XII Academy 4; Saint Mark's Club 1; W R A 

4, 3. 2, 1 (Presidenr 4); Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1. 

BARBARA SILVERMAN 

50 Chester St., Allston, Mass, 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 

DONNA L. SKEHAN 

Main St.. East Hartford, Conn. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 
4 3; Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 1; Junior 
Week 3; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2; Dean's List. 

PATRICIA MARIE STANKUNAS 
65 Lincoln St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Alpha and Omega 4; Educational Re- 
view 4, 3, 2 (Editor 4, 3); Chemistry Society 4, 3; 
Kircher Science Club 1; Women's Glee Club 4 3 2 
(Secretary 4, 3); Freshman Orientation 3, 2; Senior 
Week Committee; Junior Week Committee (Co-Chair- 
man 3); Freshman Prom Committee; Inter Class Skits 
4. 3, 1; Dean's List. 

SLLY ANN STEARNS 

16 Stevens St., Hyannis, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 4 

3 (Vice President); Sailing Club 2; Women's Council 2 

(Secretary 2); W.R.A. 4, 3. 2, 1; Sub Turri 4; Senior 

Week (Chairman 4); Junior Week Junior Show 3; 

Sophomore Prom Committee 2; Freshman Orientation 

Committee 3, 2; Inter Class Skits 4, 3, 2. 

ROSEMARY SULLIVAN 

11 Media Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 

B.S. History — Connecticut Club 2, 1; Sailing Club 2, 

1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1. 

SHEILA BRIDGET SULLIVAN 

83 County Rd.. Ipswich, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — Pope Pius XII Academy 4; 

Women's Glee Club 3, 2, 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior 

Week 3. 

JOHN PATRICK THOMPSON 

8 Paisley Pk., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. History — Kappa Epsilon 4; Camera Club 1; Radio 

Club 3, 2. 1 (Treasurer 2, Secretary' 3); Sailing Club 

2, 1; Public Speaking Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Ski Team 1 

Young Democrats Club 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4, 3, 2) 

Writers Club 2; Educational Review 4, 3; Heights } 

Writers' Workshop 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; Freshman Orien- 

PAUL FRANCIS TIGHE 

277 Alewife Brook Pkwy., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. History — Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JOAN A. TUBEROSA 

50 Barnes Ave., East Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Elementaiy Education — Italian Academy 4 3 2 1 

(Treasurer 2); Psychology Club 4. s; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 

1; Dean's Lisr. 

GREGG A. VOCI 

146 Mill St., Pitlsfteld, Mass. 

B.S. Business Education — St. Mark's Academy 4, 3, 2 

(President 3); Educational Review 4, 3 (Managing 

Editor 4. 3); Band 1; Kappa Epsilon 4; Junior Week 3; 

Dean's List. 

ALICE C. WADDEN 

48 Lexington Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education — W.R.A. 4, 3, 2; Women's 

Glee Club 4, 3. 2; Dean's List. 

MARYFRANCIS G. WHITE 

30 Monticetlo Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Classics — Psychology Club 2; French Academy 2; 

Dramatic Society 4; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement 

Committee 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; Inter Class 

Skits 4, 3, 2, 1; Sophomore Prom Committee 2. 

ROSEMARY WOODS 

72 Reservation Rd., Milton. Mass. 

B.S. Chemistry — Chemistty Society 4. 3; Kitcher Science 

Club 1; W.R.A. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Week 3; Senior Week 

4; Inter Class Skits 3. 

FAITH T. ZEADEY 

784 Onset Ave., Onset, Mass. 

B.S. Histoty. 



College of Business Administration 



ANTHONY J. ABRAHAM 

179 Haffards St., Fall River, Mass. 

B.S Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; Football 4 
3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JOHN DURHAM ARMSTRONG 

95 Douglas Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



RANDALL J. ASTOLFI 

3 Frankwood Ave., Beverly, Ma 
B.S. General Business — Fina 
Club 2. 



Club 3; Psychology 



353 



CHARLES T. AYLWARD 

378 Main St., Medfield, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance 4. 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

HARRISON BALL, JR. 

72 Lothrop St., Beverly. Mass. „ „ . , , 

BS Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 

Government Academy 4, 3; Marketing Club 4; Football 

4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

GENNARO A. BARBIERI 

217 West Main St., Milford, Conn. 

BS Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Con- 
necticut Club 2, 1; Junior Week Pops Committee 3; 
Intramurals 2, 1. 

JAMES G. BARON 

95 Hanover St.. Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 3. 

JOHN F. BARRETT 

5 1 Donnrbrook Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

B S Finance — Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Finance Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT W. BARRETT 

24 Hall Ave.. Watertown 72. Mass. 

BS. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma -i; Hand 4 1, z, 

1- Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; Sailing 

Club 4 3 2, 1; Debating Club 2; Accounting Academy 

4, 3. 

DAVID NOEL BARRY 

207 Newbury St., Hartford, Conn. . _,.,,, 

BS Distribution Management — Connecticut Club 4, 5, 

2. 1; Marketing Club 4, 3; S.A.M. 2; Sub Turn 4; 

Freshman Orientation 4; Commencement Ball Committee 

4; Dormitory Council 4; Junior Prom Committee 3. 

JOSEPH T. BARRY 

Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Ac 



JAMES RAYMOND BEAUCHAMP 

277 Bellevue Rd., Quincy 71, Mass 

B.S Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 

Plunkett Society 3, 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JOHN P. BENCH _ 

55 Mount Ida Rd., Dorchester 22, Mass. , 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 3, 2; Deans 
List; Junior Prom Committee 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

RICHARD N. BENTLEY 
3~> Tower St.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Student Senate 4, 3; Beta Gamma 
Sigma 4, 3 (President 4); Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 3; Ac- 
counting Academy 4, 3, 2; Glee Club 4, 3; Freshman 
Orientation 4. 

DAVID P. BERNARD 

.595 Merrimack St., Manchester, N. H. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3. 

ALBERT JOSEPH BERNAZANI 

9 Underwood St.. Belmont. Mass. 

BS Finance — Finance Club 4, 3 (President 4); Sail- 
ing Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3, Vice Commodore 4); 
Gold Key Society 3, 2; Sub Turri 4; Journal of Business 
4; Freshman Prom Committee; Freshman Orientation 4. 

ROBERT W. BERRY 

65 Bancroft Pi.. Hopedale. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3 (Secretary; 
Treasurer 3, 4); Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 5; Omicron Chi 
F.psilon 4. 3 ( Vice President 4) ; Economics Academy 4, 
3; Dean's List; Accounting Academy 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

FREDERIC C. BERTRAM 

85 Fanenil St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Section Representative 2, 1. 

RONALD J. BONNER 

97 Smith St., Boston, Mass. . _,..,. 

BS Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, i. 
Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Sodality 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

PIERRE A. BOULANGER 

22 Whittier Rd., W'ellesley Hills, Mass. 

BS Distribution Management — Foreign Trade Club 2; 

Marketing Club 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; 

Humanities 3; Dean's List; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

LEO J. BOURQUE 

979 Union St.. Rockland. Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3. 

RICHARD E. BOURQUE 

South Lynnfield, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

DANIEL G. BOVA 

19 Evans Rd., Stoneham, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Sodality 4; Sub Turri 4; Mendel Club 1; Commencement 
Committee 3. 

DAVID F. BOWEN 

56 Veery Rd., Attleboro, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Toastmasters Circle 2; Accounting 
Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; 
Varsity Baseball 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD W. BROSNAHAN 

401 Lowell Ave., Newtonville, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Business Club 2; Young 
Democrats Club 3; Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, I. 

ARTHUR R. BROWN 

11 Wadsworth St., Allston, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Toastmasters Circle 4; 
Marketing Club -i, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 
3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES BRYANT 

247 Boston St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; I 

4, 3, 2, 1. 

GERALD J. BUCKLEY 

187 Hillside St.. Boston 20. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Journal of Business 4. 3; Finance Club 

4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Toastmasters Circle 4, 3; 

Class Day ^Committee _4; Commencement Committee 4; 

Freshman 



JOHN N. BURKE 

124 High St.. Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Alpha 
Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3; S.A.M. 
2; Co-Chairman Junior Prom 3; Section Representative 
3; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS FRANCIS BURKE 

295 Beacon St.. Boston, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Sailing Club 4, 3, 2 (Com- 
modore 4,3). 

TIMOTHY J. BURNS 

199 Mystic St.. Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Omicron 

Chi Epsilon 4, 3; Economics Academy 4, 3; Blessed 

Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 

2, 1. 

WILLIAM BURNS 

Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

GERALD E. BUTTERWORTH 

14 Regina Terr., Auburndale, Mass, 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Senior Class Treasurer; Var- 
sity Hockey 3, 2, 1; Section Representative 2; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
WILLIAM J. CALLAGHAN 
55 Bradeen St., Roslindale, Mass, 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sodality 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Intramurals 



JOHN T. CALLAHAN 

22 Nichols Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3 (Vice President 4); Eco- 
nomics Academy 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Young 
Democrats Club 3; Psychology Club 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

ROBERT CAMMISA 
512 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Gold Key Society 3; 
S.A.M. 2; Matketing Club 4, 3; Junior Prom Committee; 
Dean's List; Bellatmine Law and Government Academy 4. 

DANIEL J. CAMPBELL 

80 Brookway Rd., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society 
4, 3; Accounting Academy 4. 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2, 1; Freshman Orientation 4; Intramurals 3, 

2, 1 

JOSEPH M. CAREY 

25 Noltinghill Rd.. Brighton, Mass. 

BS. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 3; Glee Club 2, 1; Band 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 

3. 2. 

JAMES FRANCIS CARR, JR. 

27 Corinne Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 1; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 1 ; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JAMES L. CARROLL 

43 Columbia Rd.. Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Drill Team 2, 1; Mar- 
keting Club 4; Intramurals 2, 1; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4. 

ROBERT A. CARROLL 

95 Lafayette Rd., Salisbury, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Society 4, 3; Dean's List. Intra- 
murals 4, 3. 2. 

JOSEPH R. CARTY 

37 Foster St.. Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — President Senior Class; President Sopho- 
more Class; Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3 (Secretary 4) ; Gold Key 
Society 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3 (Secretary 4); Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Section Representative 1; Inttamurals 1. 

FRANCIS CASEY 

Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance. 

THOMAS E. CASEY 

Brighton. Mass. 
B.S. Distribution. 

JOSEPH J. CASS 

20 Creighton St., Jamaica Plain 50, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior 

Prom Committee; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT L. CAWLEY 

4-iK Bridge St.. Dvdham. Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Toastmasters Circle 3, 
2, 1; Marketing Club 4, 3, 2; Sodaliry 4, 3; Young 
Democrats Club 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, I; 
als 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES R. BROWNE 

54 Walier St., North Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 



MICHAEL J. CELATA 

64 Governor Winthrop Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4. 

KENNETH JAMES CENCINI 

75 Atherton St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4; 

Young Democrats Club 3; Mendel Club 1. 

GEORGE C. CHINETTI 

Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 



ANTHONY M. CIULLA 

104 Clarence St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS E. COLLIGAN 

12 Bailey Are., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi (President 4); Glee 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Toastmasters 
Circle 4, 3, 2, 1; Commencement Committee 3; Senior 
Week 4; Freshman Class Secretary; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2. 1 

ROBERT JAMES COLLINS 

281 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Section Representative 

2, 1; Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 3, 2. 1. 

EDWARD FRANCIS COLOMEY 

45 Montcalm Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 
JOHN JOSEPH CONNELL 
1612 Columbia Rd.. South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4. 3; S.A.M. 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Sailing Club 4, 1; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 3; Hockey 3; Intra- 
murals 2. 1. 

ROBERT A. CONNELLY 

155 Hinckley Rd.. Milton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting. 

STEPHEN J. CONNERS 

122 Summer St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4; Foreign Trade Club 3, 

2 (Secretary 3) ; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES F. CONNOLLY 

Nantasket, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

MATTHEW THOMAS CONNOLLY 

4 7 Bel fort St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Delta Sigma Pi, Gold Key Society 4, 
3, 2 (Keyholder); Freshman Class Treasurer; Junior 
Class Treasurer; Senior Class Secretary; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Toast- 
masters Club 2; Freshman Orientation 4, 3; Intramurals 

3, 2, 1. 

PHILIP G. CORBETT 

85 Dean St., Stoneham, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Foreign Trade 

Club 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM S. COTTER 

74 Franklin St., Peabody, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Camera Club 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4, 3; Young Democrats Club 3; Business Club 
2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD A. COUTURE 

71 Avon St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 

STEPHEN COYNE 

89 Livermore St., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Gold Key Society (Keyholder 4, 3 
2); Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Toastmasters Circle 4 
Freshman Orienration 4; Junior Prom Committee 3 
Senior Ball Committee 4; Track 4, 3, 2. 

DANIEL F. CRIMMINS 

12 Moultrie St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Foreign Trade Club 2; Economics 

Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

DONALD CROATTI 

Framingham, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

JOHN J. CROWLEY, JR. 

11 Dundee Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

WILLIAM CROWLEY 

Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

THOMAS J. CUMMINGS 

15 Clouelly Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 4, 3, 2; 1 (Treasurer 4, 3) ; Cadet Officers' Club 

4, 3; Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Marketing Club 3. 

THOMAS J. CUNNALLY 

150 Needham St., Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Sodality 3; Marketing 
Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 
3; Business Club 2; C. D. Instructor 3. 

JAMES A. CUNNIFF 

74 Woodlawn St.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3; Young Democrats Club 2; Section Repre- 
; 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 



PAUL J. CUNNINGHAM 

40 Tennyson St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi (Treasurer); Toast- 
masters Circle 4, 2; Sub Turri (Senior Editor) ; Account- 
ing Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; 
Commencement Committee Chairman, C.B.A. 3; Co- 
Chairman Junior Week; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

FRANCIS E. CURRIE 

4 Savin Ave., Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN F. CUSACK 

58 Edgehill Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Var- 
sity Club 4, 3, 2; Pikes Peak Club 4, 3, 2; Sophomore 
Prom Committee; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH DAILEY, JR. 

114 Marrett Rd., Lexington, Mass. 



354 



B.S. General Business — Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 4: Heights 4; Young Democrats Club 2; 
Finance Club 4, 3; Baseball 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

TIMOTHY B. DALY 

18 Tappan Rd., Welleshy, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; World Re- 
lations League 3; Foreign Trade Club 2; Psychology 
Club 2; Humanities 4, 3; Freshman Orientation 4; Com- 
mencement Committee 3; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Dean*s List; Football Manager 1; Section Representa- 
tive 4. 

PETER R. D'ANGELO 

29 Sycamore St., Somerville. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Psychology Club 3, 

2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD L. DARR 

North Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

H. JEFFREY DAVIS 

100 Elderfields Rd., Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. 

B.S. General Business — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2; New 

York Club 3, 2, 1; Commencement Ball Committee 4. 

RONALD G. DAVIS 

33 Harris Rd., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Business Club 2 (Vice President); 
Camera Club 4, 3; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Sailing 
Club 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

PAUL F. DEADY 

26 Boumedale Rd., Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; 
S.A.M. 4, 3; Christian Doctrine Instructor 4, 3; Dra- 
matics Society 1 ; In 



DONALD T. DEGRANDIS 

214 West filth St., South Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4. 3 (President 
4, 3); Public Speaking Club 4: Economics Academy 4; 
Freshman Orientation 4 ' 



CHARLES R. DELLA CROCE 

24 Temple St., Revere 51, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Cadet Offi- 
cers' Club 4, 3; Marketing Club 4; Rod and Gun Club 
4; In 



STEPHEN A. DE NAPOLI 

16 North Milton St., Maiden. Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JOHN A. DENNEHY 

East Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

MICHAEL P. DERBY 

Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

JOSEPH DERFEL 

1629 Commonwealth Are., Brighton 35, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Chess Club 
2; Sophomore Prom Committee 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 
PHILIP A. DERY 

341 Newtonville Ave., Newtonville 60, Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Business Club 2; Marketing Club 
4; Finance Club 4; Rod and Gun Club 4; Young Demo- 
crats Club 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOSEPH A. DIMARINO 

11 Noyes PL, Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4. 3; Italian 
Academy 3, 2; Section Representative 3, 1; Dean's List; 
Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD PATRICK DOHERTY 

55 Lee Rd., Lenox, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; Marketing Club 4, 3; Psy- 
chology Club 4; Western Massachusetts Club 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD T. DOHERTY 

1023 Rock St., Fall River, Mass. 



Plunkett Society 2, 1. 



Club 4, 3; Blessed OH' 



PHILLIP J. DOHERTY 

72 Gridley St., Quincy. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; I 

2, 1. 



rals 4, 3, 



PAUL A. DONLAN 

49 Champney St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 
1; Gold Key 3, 2; Finance Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4; Commencement Committee 
3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT F. DONNELLY 

22 Menotomy Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Fresh- 
man Orientation 4; Sophomore Class Secretary; Intra- 
murals 2,1. 

JOHN F. DONOGHUE 

51 Crocker Rd., Medford, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

EDWARD T. DONOHOE 

29 Eaton Ave., Woburn. Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4. 3; Business Club 2; Marketing 
Club 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN J. DONOVAN 

28 Brookside Circle. Wethersfield, Conn. 
B.S. Finance — Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Finance Club 
4. 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Band 1; Camera 
Club 2; Junior Week Committee 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 



WILLIAM J. DONOVAN, JR. 

71 Bay State Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Alpha Kappa Psi; Band (Manager 4, 
3, 2, I) (Senior Manager 4); Glee Club (Manager 4, 
3, 2, 1) (Senior Manager 4); Toastmasters Circle 4, 

3, 2 (Vice President 4); Finance Club 4, 3; Ski Club 

4, 3, 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

WILLIAM T. DONOVAN 

911 Canterbury St., Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1; Marketing Club 4, 3, 2. 
WALTER F. DOWNING 
488 Huntington Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Dean's List. 
BRUCE E. DRISCOLL 
45 Park St., Lee, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management — Rod and Gun Club 4, 3, 

2 (Secretary 4); Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; 
S.A.M. 4, 3; Western Massachusetts Club 1,2. 
JAMES J. DRISCOLL 

3 Bailey Ave.. Milton. Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Camera 
Club 2; Foreign Trade Club 3, 2; Class Night Committee 
4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Junior Week Com- 
mittee 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN J. DRUMMEY, JR. 

66 Cabot St., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Chess Club 2; Intramurals 
4, 3. 2, 1. 

WILLIAM THOMAS DUANE 

20 Utica St. , Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Finance Club 4, 3; Rod and 

Gun Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 3) . 

DONALD E. DUFFY 

Somerville. Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management. 

DONALD FRANCIS DUFFY 

7 William St., Medford. Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 



ALVIN E. EDMUNDS, JR. 

128 Lexington St., East Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 
4, 3; Gold Key 2; Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Rifle Team 4 
3.2, 1; Track Team 2; Intramurals 3,2. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS ELBERY 
7 Fairview Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Toastmasters Circle 2; Sailing Club 4, 3", 2; Hockey 
Manager 4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Week Committee; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 

JOHN C. FAHERTY, JR. 

15 Cape Cod Lane, Milton 87, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Business Club 2; Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Gold Key Society 2, 1; Senior Week ( Co- 
Chairman Pops Night 1 ; Delta Sigma Pi; J.V. Hockey 
3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN J. FALVEY 

1548 Washington St., West Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; 

Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; S.A.M. 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



DOUGLAS A. FARRELL 

30 Oakland Ave., Auburndale, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3. 

ROY' JOSEPH FEDERER 

Spring Cliff, N. Y. 
B.S. Finance. 

JOSEPH F. FENNELLY 

45 Vinal Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Accounting 

Academy 4, 3, 2 (President 4); Foreign Trade Club 3, 



2; Dea 



GERALD R. FERRERA 

105 Barbara Rd.. Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Toastmasters Circle 4, 3, 2 (Vice Presi- 
dent 3, President 4); Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Fi- 
nance Club 3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 2; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JOHN A. FERRIS, JR. 

61 Dolphin Ave., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy 4, 3; Rifle Team 2, 1; Drill Team 4, 3, 2, I; 
Gold Key Society 2, 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Sociery 
2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PAUL M. FINNEGAN 

1 1 Power House Rd., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Intramurals 

4, 3. 

HENRY V. FINNERAN 

75 Fenuer St., Pawtucket, R. I. 
B.S. Finance. 

JOHN JOSEPH FINNERTY 

229 Fallen Rd., Lexington, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Finance Club 
' Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Gold Key 2; 



i Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 2,1. 



HERBERT D. FITZGERALD 

105 Scituate St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
S.A.M. 4; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4. 
3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

WILLIAM V. FITZPATRICK 

9 Larchmont Ave.. Larcbmont, N. Y. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Marketing Club 4; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3; New York Club 3, 2 1; 
Football Varsity 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



ALFRED E. FLAHERTY 

7 S panlding St. , Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S Industrial Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4; Business 
Club 2; Heights 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

CHARLES F. FLAHERTY 

Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Distriburion Management. 

JOHN J. FLAHERTY, JR. 

21 7 Manchester St., Mattapan, Mass. 

B.S Accounting — Accounting Academy 4. 3; Sodality 3 

2, 1; Section Representative 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

LAWRENCE M. FLAVIN 

909 Hancock St.. Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; S.A.M. 4; Senior 

Prom Committee 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

MICHAEL KEVIN FOLAN 

63 Hill St., Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2 ( Keyholder 
4); Section Representative 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Finance Club 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 2; 
muralJr™ 2 1 ° r Sh ° W Committee 3 ^ I[Ura ' 

FRANK W. FOLEY 

II Foskett St.. Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Blessed Oliver Plunketi 
Society 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN MICHAEL FRANCO 

2532 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 
4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 3; Toastmasters Circle 4- 
Intramurals 2, 1. 

THOMAS J. GALLAGHER, JR 

4Jr Eliot St., Mi/ton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Alpha Kappa Psi; Finance Club 4 3 
IS Vi« President 3), Gold Key Society 3, 2 (Keyholder 
3), Ski Team 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 2; Junior Prom (Chairman 3); Intramurals 

MICHAEL F. GALVIN 

i207 Washington St., Canton, Mass. 

? RI« n Tnr F ' n D a , nC , Clu 6 4 ' 3; Forei S n Trade CI "b 
2, Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Intramurals 1. 

JOSEPH B. GANNON JR. 

III Lynn St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4; Finance Club 4 3- 
Young Democrats Club 3; WBCB Radio 4; Boston toi 
lege Debating Club 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

DANIEL GENDRON 

Lanford, Me. 

B.S. General Business. 

BRIAN M. GILLIGAN 

24 Brimmer St., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4 3; Business Club 3, 2; Marketing Club 4 3 
Sodality 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. so 4, 3, 

THOMAS JOSEPH GILLIGAN, JR 

18 California Pk.. Watertown. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Economics 
Academy 4, 3, Toastmasters Circle 2; Omicron Chi 
ness°°Dei"' ; freshman Orientation 4; Journal of Busi- 

RICHARD MICHAEL GIULIANO 

i 8 c 8 C . 07 » merci «l St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S Accounting— Accounting Academy 4, 3; Drill Team 

4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 

BERNARD W. GLEASON, JR. 

47 Emerald St.. Medford. Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Officers' Club 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy ,, Gold Key Society 3; Heights Circulation! 
Irack 3, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN C. GOUZOULES 

^92 Clinton Rd.. Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

B.S. Acounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; SAM 2- 

Intramurals 2, I. 

WILLIAM J. GORMLEY, JR. 

2055 Centre St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Marketing Club 4, 3; Commencement Commit- 
tee i; Freshman Orientation 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 

WILLIAM E. GOZZI 

Route No. 1, Guilford. Conn. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Communion Breakfast 
Committee 4; Junior Show 3; Marketing Club 4; Con- 
necticut Club 3, 2, 1; Football 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, I. 
THOMAS R. GRECO 
764 Broadway, Somerville, Mass. 

B.S Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Italian Academy 3 
2; Accounting Academy 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 5; Intramurals 3, 1. 

RALPH W. GRIDLEY 

59 Howard St., Melrose. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2. 

ERNEST J. GULLA 

Melrose, Mass. 

B.S. General Business. 

PETER B. HANSON 

19 Squirrel Hill Lane, Hingbam, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Blessed Oliver Plunketi 

Society 2 1; S.A.M. 4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; 



, 1. 



JOHN J. HARNEY, JR. 

27 Bulfiuch St., Lynn. Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Bellarmine Law and Governmen 

Academy -1, 3; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Blessed Olive 

Plunkett Society 1 ; Dean's List; Intramurals. 



355 



MICHAEL C. HAWLEY 

3 Alveston St.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Football 

1; In 



CHARLES W. HAYES 

31 Johnson Rd.. Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2 ( Secre- 
tary 4); Foreign Ttade Club 2; Toastmasters Citcle 3; 
Olivet Plunkect Society 4, 3; Bellatmine Law and Gov- 
ernment Academy 4; Freshman Orientation 4; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2. 1. 

JAMES JOHN HAYES 

93 N. St., South Boston. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Finance Club 
4, 3; Gold Key Society 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1; Drill Team 3, 2. 

JOHN N. HEALY 

12 Hazel St., Waltham. Mass. 

B.S. General Business — S.A.M. 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 

Plunkett Society 1. 

RODERICK C. HEATH 

Pool Hallow. Oakland. N. J. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 2; 
Fteshman Orientation 4; Drill Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Intra- 
murals4, 3, 2, 1. 

KENNETH C. HEAVEY 

32 Hawthorne Are., Arlington. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

MARTIN J. HEGARTY 

46 Perham St., West Roxbury 32, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 4. 3; Ac- 
counting Academy 4, 3; Freshman Football 1; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 

JAMES J. HESSION 

Wobnrn. Mass. 

B.S. General Business. 

EDWARD V. HICKEY, JR. 

Scituate, Mass. 

B.S. General Business. 

VINCENT J. HOGAN, JR. 

7 Niagara St., Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Western Massachusetts Club 4, 1; Finance 
Club 4, 3; Class Night Committee 4; Varsity Football 
4, 3. 2, 1. 

JAMES H. HOYE 
S Osborne Rd.. Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Toastmasteis 
Circle 3; Section Representative 4, 3; Freshman Orienta- 
tion 4; Prom Committee 4, 3; Senior Dinner Dance 
Committee. 

EDWARD C. HUFF 

1 40 3 17th St. N.W.. Winter Haven, Via. 

B.S. General Business — Sub Turri 4; Finance Club 4; 

Dorm Council 2; Golf Team 4, 3. 

PAUL M. HUGHES 

10 Sherrick Ave., Holbrook, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Gold 
Key Society 2; Freshman Orientation 4; Senior Ball 4; 
Football 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JOHN J. KELLEHER, III 

326 East 46th St., Savannah, Ga. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1; C. D. In- 
structor 2; Toastmasters Citcle 4; Senior Class Night 
(Co-Chairman) ; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



MURTAGH M. HUNT 

36 Cushman Rd., Brighton 33, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2; Young Democrats Club 2; 
Section Representative 1; Intramurals. 

MICHAEL D. HURLEY 

2787 Hudson Blvd., Jersey City, N. J. 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; New Yotk 
Club 4, 3, 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Juniot 
Week Committee; Junior Show; Varsity Football 4, 3, 
2, 1; Inttamurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



WILLIAM V. HYLAND 

239 Stratford St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 
4, 3 (Treasurer 3); Gold Key 2; Toastmasteis Circle 2; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Junior Show 3; 
Junior Week Committee (Chairman 3); Commen 
Committee 4; Freshman Orientation; Intramurals 3, 



RONALD W. JAGIELLO 

10 Whiter St., Adams, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3. 

N. PETER JOHNSON 

89 Lasell St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2 ( Ptesident 4); 
Journal of Business 4, 3, 2 (Editor-in-Chief 4); Foreign 
Trade Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (President 4); Economics Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; Lewis Drill Team 2, 1. 

STEPHEN L. JONES 

69 Cherry St., Wenham, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4. 3; Cadet Offi- 
cers' Club 4, 3; Commencement Committee 3; Intra- 
murals 1. 

FRANCIS PATRICK KEANEY 

74 Melbourne St., Portland, Me. 

B.S. Finance — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Fi- 
nance Club 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy 3; Maine Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Football 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS MICHAEL KEANEY 

74 Melbourne St., Portland, Me. 

B.S. Finance — Maine Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Marketing Club 
4, 3; Finance Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
4; Accounting Academy 3; Football 4, 3, 2, 1; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD J. KEEGAN, JR. 

11 Yeoman St., Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Economics Academy 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



GERALD V. KELLEY, JR. 

32 Cherry St.. Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3. 

OLIVER G. KELLEY 

6 Birc/j Line. Winchester, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Varsity Golf Team 

4; In 



ROBERT J. KELLEY 

80 Pleasant St.. North Altleboro. Mass. 
B.S. Management — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 
2, 1; S.A.M. 4, 3; Historical Society 4; Rod and Gun 
Club 4; Intramurals 4, 2, 1. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS KELLY 
36 Hornbeam Hill Rd., Chelmsford, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Sub Turri (Collection Manager 4); Fi- 
nance Club 4, 3; Economics Academy 3, 2; Gold Key 
Society 4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 5; Sailing Club 4, 
3; Journal of Business 4, 3, 2 (Senior Staff 4); Dean's 
List. 

JAMES N. KEPPLE 
320 Kenyon St., Fall River, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4, 3, 2; Accounting Academy 3; Marketing Club 
4, 3; Camera Club 3, 2; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; 
,3,2,1. 



ROBERT H. KERESEY 

183 Green St., Gardner, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Junior Show 3; Camera 
Club 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Pops Night 4; Inttamurals 4, 3, 2; Football 
4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES V. KERRIGAN 

28 Emerald St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Gold Key 3; Foreign 
Trade Club 3, 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; De- 
bating Society 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN J. KILKELLY 

164 Raymond St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Finance Club 
4, 3; WBCB 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; Commence- 
ment Committee 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RICHARD D. KING 

132 Williams Ave., Winsled. Conn. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 

Business Club 2; Connecticut Club 1; Intramurals 4, 



ROBERT G. KLIM 

;/ Monk St.. Stoughton. Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4; Intramurals 

4, 3. 2, 1. 

ANTHONY J. KOENIG 

116 Andrew St., Kingston, N. Y. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4; New York 

Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN C. KRASKOUSKAS 

27 Abbott St., Gardner, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Camera Club 4, 3, 
2; Western Massachusetts Club 4, 3, 2; Juniot Show; 
als 3, 2, 1. 



PAUL D. KRZEWICK 

30 Cummings Rd.. Newton Center, Mass. 

B.S Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Young Democrats 

Club 2; Business Club 2, 1. 

ANTHONY F. LACAMERA 

48 Madison St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 3; Inttamutals 

2, 1. 

FREDERICK J. LAIDLAW, JR. 

141 Cottage Park Rd., Winthrop. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JOHN L. LAMBERT 

21 Leverich St., Hempstead, N. Y. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Camera Club 2; New 
York Club 4, 3, 2, I; Junior Prom Committee; Intra- 
murals 2,1. 

JOSEPH J. LARAIA 

802 Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 2. 

ANTHONY JOSEPH LA ROSA 

91 Woodlaivn St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Athletic Association 
Representative 4; Marketing Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Junior Week Committee 3; Football 
Varsiry 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

FRANK LAVEY 

62 Prichard Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Gold Key 4, 3; 
Assistant Freshman Football Coach 4; Football 3, 2, 1; 
Senior Dinner Dance Committee 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

WILLIAM J. LEADER 

7 Sachem St., Boston. Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Officets' 
Club 4. 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Gold Key 
3; Rod and Gun Club 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 

ROBERT JAMES LEATHE 

139 Galen St., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Finance 

Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2. 

PHILIP LE BLANC 

200 Lafayette St., Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1; 

Psychology Club 4; Matketing Club 4; French Club 4, 3. 



MARTIN R. LEE 

6 Pcvir/ 5f. , Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 
3; Marketing Club 3, 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 
2; Spanish Academy 1. 

WILLIAM J. LEEN 

1040 Adams St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3. 

HUGH LENNON, II 

Canajoharie, N. Y. 

B.S. Distribution Management — WBCB Radio 4, 3; 
S.A.M. 4, 3; New York Club 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
EDWARD M. LEVITT 
120 Beverly Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Debating Society 2, 1; Rod and 
Gun Club 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 3, Vice President 4); Fi- 
nance Club 4, 3. 

CORNELIUS F. LEWIS, JR. 

13 Lexington St., Everett, Mass, 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 1; Freshman Orientation 4; Intra- 
murals 1. 

EDWARD J. LOCKE 
16 Partridge St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance. 

RICHARD D. LONG 

411 East Main St., Avon, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4. 3; Inttamurals 2, 1. 

JOHN F. LYDON 

>8 Press Ave., Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Finance— Finance Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 1; Intramurals 1. 

JAMES D. LYNCH 

68 Waban Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; B.C. Glee 
Club 4, 3, 2; Toastmasters Circle 4; Sodality 3, 2, 1 
( Secretary-Treasurer 2, 1 ) ; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 1 ; C. D. Instructor 2. 

PAUL J. LYNCH 

372 West Roxbury Pkwy., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Marketing Club 4; Blessed Oliver 

Plunkett Society 2,1; Freshman Vice President. 

RICHARD JAMES LYNCH 

19 Riley Ave.. East Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. Disttibution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
als 2, 1. 



JOHN D. LYONS 

3 Shenandoah St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2; 

Finance Club 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 2. 

PAUL V. LYONS 

7 Clancy Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3, 

2, 1; S.A.M. 4, 3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3 (Treasurer 
4); Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4, 3, 2, 1; The 
Heights 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN NEIL MacPHERSON, JR. 

231 Savin Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Hockey 4, 3, 1; Band 

3, 2; Sailing Club 2, 1. 

THOMAS W. MAGUIRE 

63 Cass St., West Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Intta- 
murals 2, 1. 

ROBERT PAUL MAHONEY 

142 Warren Ave., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Matketing Club 4; 
als 4, 3, 2, 1; Freshma ~ 



STEPHEN A. MAHONEY 

36 Dartmouth St., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4; J.V. Hockey 3; 
Intramurals 4, 2, 1. 

JOHN E. MALONEY, JR. 

16 Sutherland Rd.. Brooklme, Mass. 

BS. Finance — Finance Club ^; Economics Club 2; In- 



FRANCIS X. MANNING, JR. 

30 Dracut St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Intra- 
murals 2, 1. 

PIERRE A. MARCEAU 

39 Thompson St., Amesbury, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Alpha Kappa Psi; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 
3; Basketball 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

LEONARD W. MARMA 

443 West 36 St., New York.N. Y. 

B.S Marketing — Marketing Club 4. 3 (Vice Ptesident 
4); New York Club 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Law and Gov- 
ernment Academy 4, 3; Cameta Club 4, 3, 2; Public 
Speaking Club 2; Junior Week Committee; Senior Week 
als 4, 3, 2. 



DONALD R. MARSDEN 

21 Park Vale Ave., Allslon, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy 4, 3, 2 (Vice President 4); Senior Week 
Co-Chairman 4; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



NICHOLAS DANIEL MASTRONARDI 

103 Taft Ave., Long Beach, N.Y. 

B.S. General Business — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2 
(Secretary 4); S.A.M. 4, 3, 2 (Secretary 3); Finance 
Club 4, 3; Dormitory Council 3, 2; Sub Turn 3; Cadet 
Officers' Club 3; New York Club 3, 2, 1; Class Repre- 
:2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



LAWRENCE P. MATTHEWS 

129 Williams St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management — Matketing Club 4, 3; 
urals 2, 1. 



356 



HENRY L. McAULIFFE, JR. 

116 Laveview Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management. 

JOHN F. McAULIFFE, JR. 

20 Woodland Rd.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Heights 3, 2 (Editorial Writer); 
Journal of Business 4, 3; Foreign Trade Club 4, 3 (Vice 
President i ) ; Economics Academy 4, 3; Gold Key 
Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Key Holder 4, 3); Sub Turri 4; 
Sophomore Prom Committee; Section Representative 3, 2, 
1; Golf Team 4, 3. 2 (Captain 4) ; Dean's List. 

JOHN T. McAULIFFE 

25 Pairview PL. Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3, 
2, 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Varsity Basket- 
ball 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

WILLIAM F. McCABE 
614 South St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4. 3, 2; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1. 
JOHN F. McCAULEY 
27 Peabody St., Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; C.B.A. De- 
bating Society 2, 1. 

robert j. Mcdonald 

17 Bruce St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Marketing Club 4, 3; Toast- 
masters Circle 3; Heights 2, 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; Young Democrats Club 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 

2, 1. 

DONALD CHARLES McGONAGLE 

494 Medford St.. Maiden 48. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 3; Intramurals 

2. 1. 

JOHN P. McGONIGLE 

54 Hillside Rd., Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management. 

RAYMOND P. McGUIGGIN 

10 Woodvtlle Pk.. Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Marketing Club 4, 3; Gold Key 
Society 3, 2; Heights 2, 1; Toastmasters Circle 2; 
WBCB 3 ( Business Manager ) ; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2, 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES L. McGUINNESS, JR. 

11 Wentworth PL, Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 
2, 1. 

PAUL C. MCLAUGHLIN 

18 Burgoyne St., Dorchester 24, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Economics Academy 
4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2. 

DONALD J. McLELLAN 

53 Hillsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Alpha Kappa 

Psi 3, 2; Accounting Academy 4. 3; Chess Club 3, 2; 

Business Club 2; Gold Key 2; Dean's List; Intramurals 

2, 1. 

JOHN B. McNAMARA 

76 Prince St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 

4); Delta Sigma Pi; Finance Club 4, 3; Junior Barn 

Dance Chairman 3; Commencement Week Chairman 4; 

Hockey 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

ROBERT F. McQUIGGAN 

2 7 Lr'ierty J7., Walt ham, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 

2, 1. 

WILLIAM CHESTER MELIA 

55 Oakdale Ave., Weston, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Alpha Sigma Nu 4, 3; Beta Gamma 
Sigma 4, 3 (Vice President 4); Omicron Chi Epsilon 
4, 3 (Secretary 4); Economics Academy 4, 3; Cadet 
Officers' Club 4, 3; Toastmasters Circle 4, 3; Dean's 
als 2, 1. 



ARTHUR R. MICHAUD 

3 Hersey St., Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3, 2; Rod and 
Gun Club 3, 2; Commencement Committee 3; Sailing 
Club 2; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

BARRY P. MITCHELL 

1255 North Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
B.S. Distribution Management — Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 4; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 
3; Marketing Club 4. 3 (Treasurer 4); New York Club 
4, 3, 2, 1; Junior Prom Committee 3; Junior Show 3; 
urals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



DONALD MITCHELL 

61 Neponset Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3 (Vice President 4); 
Camera Club 4; Chess Club 3; Foreign Trade Club 4; 
Young Democrats Club 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 
Society 2; Junior Prom Committee 3; Co-Chairman Com- 
mencement Ball. 

ROBERT M. MONAHAN 

35 Menotomy Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Marketing — Bellarmine Law and Government Acad- 
emy 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS L. MONAHAN, JR. 

22 Dawson St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Senior Class Secretary; 

Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Cadet 

Officers' Club 4, 3 (President 4); Freshman Orientation 

Committee 4; Section Representative 3; Intramurals 3, 

2, 1. 

WILLIAM JUSTIN MOONEY 

9 Wyman Terr., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Economics 

Academy 4. 3; Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 

4; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



OLIVA A. MORNEAU 

167 High St., Berlin. N. H. 

B.S. Accounting — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2; Accounting 

Academy 4, 3; Sodaliry 4, 3, 2. 

CHARLES T. MORRISON 

25 Blakeley St.. West Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4. 3; Blessed Oliver 

Plunkett Society 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CHRISTOPHER COAKLEY MORTON 

Booth Rd.. Ktrtland Hills, Mentor, 0. 

B.S. General Business — Alpha Kappa Psi 4, 3, 2; 

Heights 4, 3, 2 (Associate Editor 4); Sub Turri 4; 

Foreign Trade Club 4; Freshman Orientation 4; Public 

Affairs Forum 3; Dean's List. 

FRANK P. MUCKIAN 

5 1 Orchard St., Lynn. Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Intramurals 

2, 1. 

JOHN F. MULLEN, JR. 

15 Katberine Rd., Stoneham, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Junior Vice President; 
Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3 (Vice President 4); SAM. 
4, 3, 2; Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2, 1; Delta Sigma Pi 
Business Fraternity 4, 3, 2; Sub Turri 4; Section Repre- 
sentative 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 

DANIEL I. MURPHY, JR. 

200 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3 (Treasurer 
4); Economics Academy 4, 3; Rod and Gun Club 4; 
als 1. 



HUGH F. MURRAY, JR. 

11 Higgins St.. Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Economic 

Academy 3; Dean's List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

GARRY G. NEAL 

10 Home Ave., Natick, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Sociey 4; Historical Society 4; Rod and 
Gun Club 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JOSEPH F. NEAL, JR. 

21 Hillside St.. Pramingham, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4. 3; Camera Club 4, 3; 
Junior Week Committee; Senior Week Committee. 

RICHARD J. NEE 

256 O'Callaghan Way, South Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Chess Club 1; Blessed Oliver Plunkett 

Society 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3. 

JAMES JOSEPH NORTON 

1 08 Alexander St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ( Keyholder 

3, 4); Delta Sigma Pi; Finance Club 3, 4 (Treasurer 
3 ) ; WBCB Radio 4, 3; Junior Week Committee. 

JAMES MICHAEL NORTON 

22 Prospect St., Milford, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 3, 2; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 
2, 1. 

ROBERT KIMBERLEY NOVAK 
60 Valley Rd., Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy 4, 3; Markering Club 4, 3; Business Club 
2; Radio Club 4; Junior Varsity Hockey 3. 

FRANCIS C. OATWAY 

Kent Ave., Devonshire, Bermuda 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Haskins 
and Sells Award 4; Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES S. O'BRIEN 

1778Whitney Ave., Hamden, Conn. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3, 

2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Connecticut Club 

4, 3, 2, 1; WBCB Radio 4; Varsity Football 4, 3, 2; 
' i, 3, 2, 1. 



Acad- 
idents 



KEVIN A. ODONNELL 

38 Blenford Rd.. Brighton. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 

Government Academy 4; Hockey Team 3, 1. 

RICHARD J. OGDEN 

44 Colbnrn Rd,, Reading, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4; Accounting Academy 
4, 3. 

ROSS O'HANLEY 

11 Stuart St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Commencement Com- 
mittee 3 (Chairman); Marketing Club 4; Roberr Bellar- 
mine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Varsity 
Football 4, 3. 

THOMAS O'HARE 

41 Boylston St.. Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2, 1; 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 2; Ac 
Academy 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



JOEL T. O'BRIEN 

56 Samson Rd,. Medford, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management — Alpha Kappa Psi; 
4, 3, 2, 1 (Vice President 4, Treasurer 3); S.A.I 
3; Debating Society 2, 1 (President 2). 

THOMAS F. O'BRIEN 

11 Standisb Rd.. Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi; Accounting 
emy 4, 3, 2; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Sub Tc 
Gold Key 2, 1; Band 4, 3, 2, 1; Foreign St 
Committee 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS L. O CONNELL 

7 6 Cross St.. Uxbridge, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3. 2; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Psychology Club 4; Camera 
Club 2, 1; Rhode Island Club 4, 3; Sailing Club 2; 
Western Massachusetts Club 1; Junior Prom Committee; 
, 3, 2, 1. 



JAMES J. O'KEEFE 

22 Dean St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Section Representative 2, 1^; Account- 
ing Academy 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; Freshm; 
4; Communion Breakfast Committee 3. 

EDWARD TERENCE O'LEARY 

22 Bailey Rd,, Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Toas 

4; Band 4, 3, 2, 1 ( President 4) . 

WALTER H. O'LEARY 

14 Fletcher Terr., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Alpha Kappa Psi; Sub 
Turri 4 (Advertising Manager 4); Marketing Club 4, 3 
(President 4); Junior Class President; Sophomore Class 
Treasurer; Freshman Orientation 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 
3, 2, 1 ; Dean's List. 

JOHN ANTHONY OLSZEWSKI 

18 Gil way Rd., Saugus, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; S.A.M. 4, 3; Business Club 2; 
Accounting Academy 2; Marketing Club 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1. 

KEVIN G. O'NEIL 

182 Orchard St., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Delta Sigma Pi (Treasurer 4, 3); 
Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2 (Keyholder 4, 3 ) ; Foreign 
Trade Club 2; Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; 
Dramatic Society 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; 
Maine Club 4; Junior Week Committee; Student Govern- 
ment Representative 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 

ROBERT C. O'NEILL 

59 Mystic St., West Medford, Mass. 

B.S Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 

Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN R. O'ROURKE 

66 Irving St.. Watertown. Mass. 

B S. Distribution Management — Gold Key Society 1; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Sodality 4, 3; Mar- 
keting Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

DONALD W. PALMER 

6 Evelyn Ave., Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Glee Club 
4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 4); Alpha Sigma Nu 4 (President 
4); Economics Academy 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3); 
Omicron Chi Epsilon 4, 3; Marketing Club 1; Junior 
Show 3. 

SAMUEL A. PANELLA 

9 Park Ave., Thompsouville, Conn. 

B.S Industrial Management — Connecticut Club 4, 3, 
2, 1; Rod and Gun Club 4, 3, 2; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4, 3; Italian Academy 3; S.A.M. 4, 3; 
Prom Committee 4, 3, 2; Junior Show; Intramurals 3, 2. 

ROBERT A. PATTERSON 

49 Kilbourne Ave., New Britain, Conn. 

B S Economics — Alpha Kappa Psi; Economics Academy 

4; Connecticut Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 2, 1. 

JOSEPH F. PERACHI, JR. 

676 Lowell St., Lexington 73, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — S.A.M. 4, 3; Business Club 2; 
Foreign Trade Club 2; Toastmasters Circle 2; Sailing 
Club 4, 3, 2; Rod and Gun Club 2; Sub Turri 4; 
Freshman Orientation 4; Intramurals 2, 1. 



DAVID L. PERGOLA 

173 Charles St., Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Hockey 4, 
3, 2, 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 2, 1. 
WILLIAM J. PERRON, JR. 
82 Park St.. Holyoke, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Alpha Kappa Psi ( Master of Rituals 
4); Economics Academy 4, 3, 2; Sub Turri 4 (Business 
Manager): Journal of Business 4, 3, 2 (Circulation Man- 
ager 3, Senior Staff 4); Band 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3); 
Western Mass. Club 4, 3, 2 (Vice President 3); 
Dean's List. 

PHILIP E. PETERS, JR. 

13 Stockton St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4; Intramurals 

2, 1 

ROBERT SEBASTION PETKEWICH 

123 Maple St., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 

Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 

Plunkett Society 1; Intramurals 3,2,1. 

ALPHONSE P. PETROSINO 

375 Maiden St., Revere. Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3, 2; Cadet 

Officers' Club 4, " 



FRANK H. PETTEE 

2 North Maine St., Avon. Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Beta Gamma Sigma 4; Omicron Chi 
Epsilon 4, 3 (Vice President 3, President 4); Economics 
Academy 4, 3; World Relations League 3; Dean's List; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD M. PHELAN 

26 Car ruth St., Quincy 69, Mass. 

~).S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Basket- 



ball 1 ; I 



, 3, 

RICHARD J. PIERCE 

64 Old Middlesex Rd.. Belmont 78, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 2 (Keyholder 
4); Delta Sigma Pi; Finance Club 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; 
Freshman Orientation Committee 4; Student Government 
Representative 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD J. POLLIS 

14 Tolrnan St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — -Marketing Club 4, 3; 

Young Democrats 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 

EDWARD J. POWERS, JR. 

45 Benclifje Cir., Aublirudale, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Heights Edi- 
torial Staff 3, 2; Journal of Business 3 (Managing Editor 
3) ; Writers Workshop 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1. 



357 



ROBERT M. PUOPOLO 

65 Woburn St.. Lexington, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Government 
Academy 4, 5; Freshman Football; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
ROBERT J. PYNE 

41 Norman Rd., Melrose, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; Marketing Club 4, 3; Business 
Club 2; Intramurals 4. 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS F. QUINN, JR. 

1285 Massachusetts Ave., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 
JOSEPH E. RABBITT 
55 Belnel Rd., Mattapan 26, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Section Represent- 
ative 3. 2; Football 1; Intramurals 3, 2. 
GERALD F. RAMSY 
29 Douglas Rd., Belmont. Mass. 
B.S. Finance. 

FREDERICK C. RATTIGAN, JR. 

1 33 Hillside Rd., Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Finance — S.A.M. 2; Finance Club 4, 3. 
THOMAS JOHN RATTIGAN 
76 Silvin Rd.. Willim.imsett. Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Western Mass. Club 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Treasurer 1); Finance Club 4, 3; Section Repre- 
sentative 4. 

WILFRED W. RAYMOND, JR. 

27 High St., Caribou, Maine 

B.S. General Business — Alpha Kappa Psi; Finance 
Club 4; Toastmaster Circle 3, 2; N.F.C.C.S. 3, 2 
< Treasurer 3 ) . 

JOHN E. REAGAN, JR. 

139 Elmwood Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Connecticut 
Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Marketing Club 4; Blessed Oliver Plun- 
kett Society 4; Co-Chairman Junior Week 3; Toastmasters 
1 ; Dinner Dance Commirtee 4; Junior Show; Intramurals 

DONALD ANTHONY REGAN 

760 Canterbury St., Roslindale. Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Bellarmine Law and Government 
Academy 4, 3; Sodality 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
JAMES PETER REGAN 
21 Leah St., Melrose, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Bellarmine Law and Gov- 
ernment Academy 4; Intramurals 3, 1. 
PAUL J. RIGAZIO 
9 Cedar St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Accounting 
Academy 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4); Freshman Orientation 
4; Chess Club 3. 
NORMAN B. RINEHART 

42 Southside Ate., Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management. 
DAVID W. ROCHON 

108 Rumstick Rd., Barrington, R. I. 

B.S. Finance — Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1 (Secretary 3 

2, President 4); Finance Club 4, 3; Rhode Island Club 
4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

THOMAS R. ROCK 

41 Unity Ave., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Accounting 

Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2. 

PETER F. ROUGHAN 

92 Hudson St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 

Blessed Oliver Plunkett Sociery 4, 3; Sodaliry 2 1' Drill 

Team 4, 3, 2, 1; Freshman Orientation 4; Intramurals 

REAL O. ROY 

179 Lincoln Blvd.. Rumford, Maine 

B.S. Finance — Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3, 2; Gold Key 

Society 4, 3; Maine Club 4, 3, 2; French Academy 3; 

Debating Society 2, 1 (Secretary 2). 

ROBERT H. RUDMAN 

25 Burn-ham St. Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Foreign Trade Club 3, 2 (Treasurer 

3, 2); Economics Academy 4, 3; Debating Society 2; 
S.A.M. 2; Finance Club 3; Marketing Club 1; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 1; Sub Turri 4; Hockey 4, 3, 
2, 1; Golf Manager 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES J. RUSH 
36 Beechland St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Section 
Representative 1. 
DAVID M. RUSSO 
25 Trowbridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 4; Rod and Gun Club 4; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
JOHN MICHAEL RYAN 
50 Oregon St., Roxbury 20, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M 4, 3 (Treasurer 
4); Toastmasters Circle 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
LAWRENCE D. RYAN 
11 Warner St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 1; Blessed Olivet 
Plunkett Society I. 
JOHN RICHARD SCABIA 

43 Playstead Rd., Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 3; Psychology Club 1; 
Sailing Club 2. 
JOSEPH A. SCALI 
100 Lexington St., Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3. 
RALPH J. SCALLY, JR. 
908 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN J. SCHOPPMEYER 

76 Joyce Rd., Plainville, L.I., N.Y. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Foreign Trade Club 3, 

2; Basketball 4, 3, 2 (Captain 4); Baseball 4, 3, 2. 



CHARLES R. SEYMOUR 

22650 Shaker Blvd.. Shaker Heights, 0. 
B.S. Economics — Alpha Kappa Psi: Economics Academy 
4, 3; S.A.M. 2; Camera Club 4, 3 (Vice President 4); 
Heights 3; Gold Key Society 2, 1; Foreign Trade Club 
2; Junior Show; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



THOMAS F. SHARKEY 

86 Lavoli Ave., Braintree, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Beta Gamma Sigma 4, 3; Finance Club 

4, 3; Dean's List. 

ROBERT C. SHEA 

6 Oswald St., Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Finance. 

JOHN P. SHEEHAN, JR. 

3-i Ware Rd.. Needham, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Camera 
Club 4; Fulton Debating Society 2; Dean's List; Drill 
Team 1. 

PETER J. SHEEHAN 

374 Crescent St., Brockton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Blessed Oliver Plun- 
kett Society 3; World Relations League 3; Intramurals 

VINCENT S. SIEFCAK 

68 Brook Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Intramurals 

2, 1. 

ANTHONY J. SIGNORELLO 

8 Yeoman St.. Boston 19, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Officers' 
Club ( Secretary^ ) ; Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society 
4, 3; Freshma 



FRANCIS J. SIMON, JR. 

24 Grafton Ave., East Milton 86, Mass. 
B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Officers' 
Club 4; Freshman Prom Committee; Intramurals 4, 
3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD CHRISTOPHER SMITH 

16 Everett St., Melrose, Mass. 

B.S. Marketing — Marketing Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law 
and Government Academy 4, 3; Varsity Club 4, 3, 2; 
Pikes Peak Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1 (Captain 
4); Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



KENNETH E. SNYDER 

87 Oakland St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Toastmastets Circle 4; Finance Club 4, 
3; Foreign Trade Club 3; Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; 
als 3, 2, 1. 



JOHN F. SOLAN, JR. 

68 Orchard St., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Robert 
Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 3; " 



LEO BRENDAN SPENCER 

60 Presley St., Maiden, Mass, 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government 4, 3; Blessed Olivet Plunkett Society 4; 
Marketing Club 4, 3; Section Representative 3; Intra- 
murals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

GERARD H. SPENDLEY 

15 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Holbrook, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Cadet Officers' Club 4, 3; Finance Club 
4, 3; Toastmasters Club 4; Senior Class Night Committee 
4; Varsity Baseball 4, 3; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



RICHARD J. STANTON 

151 Draper St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Blessed Oliver Plun- 
kett Society 1; Inttamurals 2, 1. 

JOSEPH C. STEINKRAUSS 

16 Dustin St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Gold Key Society 4, 3, 
2, 1 (Keyholder); S.A.M. 4, 3; Sub Turri 4; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Society 4, 3; Fteshman Otientation 
Committee 4; Senior Dinner Dance Chairman; Junior 
Prom Committee (Chairman); Section Representative 
1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

DANIEL FRANCIS SUGHRUE 

1716 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — S.A.M. 2; Marketing 

Club 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2, 1 



EDWARD M. SULLIVAN 

76 Cougreve St., Roslindale 31, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Band 4, 3, 

2, 1; Junior Week Committee; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD ROBERT SULLIVAN 

8 Moultrie St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 

Journal of Business 2, 1; Dean's List; Intramurals 2, 1, 

FRANK SULLIVAN 
38 Allston St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3 
(President 3); Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Busi- 
ness Club 2; Section Representative 2, 1; Freshman Prom 
e; Intramurals 1. 



GERALD P. SULLIVAN 

69 Bostonia Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4; Marketing Club 4, 3; Golf 3; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES EDWARD SULLIVAN 

200 Courtney Ave., Pawtucket, R.I. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Rhode Island Club 4, 3; Junior Week Committee 3; 
Business Club 2; Section Representative 4; Varsity Club 
4; Varsity Football 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

JAMES J. SULLIVAN 

1 25 Wood bole Ave., Mattapan, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi (Vice President 3); 
Sodality 2, 1; Section Representative 3, 2; Toastmasters 
Circle 2; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 3, 2. 



PAUL J. SULLIVAN 

149 Pleasant St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Blessed Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Business Club 2; 
Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

STEPHEN V. SULLIVAN 

83 Adams St., Medford, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — Beta Ga 

S.A.M. 4, 3; Freshma ~ 



Sigma 4, 3; 



WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 

111 Standish Rd.. Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4, 3; 
Delta Sigma Pi 4, 3; Gold Key 2, 1; Senior Class Vice 
President; Christian Docttine Instructor 3, 2; Freshman 
Orientation 4; Commencement Week Committee 3; Sec- 
tion Representative 2; Junior Week Committee 3; Intra- 
murals 3, 2, 1. 

JOHN R. SUPPLE 

22 West Bourne St., Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management — Marketing Club 4; 
Radio Club 3; Section Representative i; Freshman Orien- 
tation 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PAUL F. SWEENEY 

100 Mail, St., Cbarhuou 
B.S. Accounting — Acco 
List; Intramurals 4, 3, 2. 



Mass. 
ting Academy 4, 3, 2; Dean': 



Accounting 
als 1. 



ALFRED W. SWEENIE 

214 Beach St., Quincy, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Beta Gamma Sigma 4 

Academy 4, 3; Young Democrats Club 4; I 

DANIEL M. THIBAULT 

13 Saville St., Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Marketing Club 4, 3; Busi- 
ness Club 2; Young Democrats Club 3; Intramurals 
4, 3, 2, 1. 

EDWARD M. THOMPSON 

150 Gray St., Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Finance. 

JAMES JOSEPH TIMONEY 

22 West St., Maiden. Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Managemen 
Drill Team 2, 1; Sodality 2, 

JAMES E. TONRA 

782 East St., Dedham, Mass. 
B.S. Finance. 

JOSEPH W. TOPOR, JR. 

118 Main St., Three Rivers, Mass. 

B.S. Finance — Finance Club 4, 3; Bellarmine Law and 
Government Academy 4, 3; Economics Academy 4; 
Western Mass. Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

DONALD B. TOSI 

300 Lafayette St., Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Football 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Ttack 1; Marketing Club 4; Varsity Club 4; Intramurals 
3, 2, 1. 

DANIEL P. TOUMBAKIS 

55 Central St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Marketing Club 4, 3. 

JOHN F. TRACY 

2160 Commonwealth Ave., Aubnrndale, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Alpha Kappa Psi; Accounting Acad- 
emy 4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 
ROBERT F. TRAINOR 
19 Alkamont Ave., Scarsdale, N.Y. 
B.S. Finance— Finance Club 4, 3; New York Club 4, 

3, 2, 1; Accounting Academy 4, 3; Dormitory Council 
2, 1; Basketball 1; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

CHARLES CHRISTOPHER TRETTER 

46 Co/bum St., Westwood, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Finance Club 4, 3; Dramatic Society 

4, 3; Economics Academy 3; Sub Turri 4; Band 2, 1; 
Dean's List; Commencement Week Committee 3; Fresh- 
man Orientation 4. 

NICHOLAS C. VERTULLO 

78 Fairmount Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Accounting Academy 4, 3; Baseball 
urals4, 3, 2, 1. 



1; I 



JOHN R. WAGNER 

37 Bullard St., Dorchester, Mi, 
B.S. Distribution Managemen 
Sodality 2, 1; Drill Team 2, 

LEONARD F. WALL 

2 Lindall St.. Roslindale. Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Young Democrats Club 4, 3; 

Economics Academy 4, 3; Intramurals 2, 1. 

EDWIN N. WALLWORK 

41 Cypress St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Bellarmine Law and 

Government Academy 4; Golf Team 4; Marketing Club 

4, 3, 2; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 

RONALD F. WALSH 

47 Alpha Rd.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Matketing Club 4; 

Hockey Varsity 4, 3, 2; Section Representative 3. 

EDWARD J. WHALEN 

S9 Fairmount St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Industrial Management — S.A.M. 4, 3; Bellarmine 
Law and Government Academy 4, 3; Blessed Oliver 
Plunkett Society 4; Intramurals 4, 2, 1. 

JOHN A. WINCHENBAUGH 

41 Grafton St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Economics Academy 4, 3; Blessed 
Oliver Plunkett Society 2; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Ski 
Club 4; Psychology Club 2; Wotld Relations League 3; 
Intramurals 2, 1. 

LEO J. WINKEL 

62 Church St., Wallham, Mass. 

B.S. Distribution Management — Commencement Com- 
mittee 3; Freshman Orientation 4; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



358 



ALEXANDER V. WISNESKI 
27 Killen Rd.. East Walpole, Mass. 
B.S. Distribution Management. 



STEPHEN R. WITKUN 

65 Filth St., Cambridge. Mass. 

B.S. Disttibution Management — Gold Key Society 4, 
3 (Keyholder 4, 3); Marketing Club 4, 3; Drill Team 2, 
1; Freshman Orientation Committee 4; Commeno 
Ball Committee 4; Intramurals 4, 3, 2, 1. 



NORMAN STANLEY ZALKIND 
47 Parkvale Ave.. Allston, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Marketing Society 4, 3; Busi- 
ness Club 4; S.A.M. 2; Intramural Sports 4, 3, 2, 1. 



PATRICIA ANN BARKER 
146 Pauline St., Winthrop, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Basketball 1. 
KATHERYN PATRICIA BRENT 
Scoville Hill, Harwtnton. Conn. 

B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organizarion 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Glee Club 3, 2; Library Committee Chairman 2; Co- 
Chairman of Communion Breakfast 4. 

ELAINE M. BUCKLEY 

91 Autumn St., Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; Student Government 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Nominating Committee 
3; Dean's List. 

MARTHA A. CADIGAN 

38 Lincoln St., Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Faculty Organization 4. 3, 2, 1 
(President 4, Treasurer 3); Class President 2; Class Vice 
President 1; Sophomore Class Council 2; Sodality 4, 3, 

2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement Week Committee 
3; Dean's List. 

MARY ELIZABETH CAMPBELL 

36 Parsons St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council Member 2; Class Treas- 
urer 2; Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2. 1; Student- 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 
CAROLINE FRANCES CHINETTI 
25 Arcadia St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student Government 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Senior 
Ball Commirtee 4. 
LINDA ANN COLLINS 
49 Highfield Rd., Qmncy. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 
HELEN PATRICIA CONNELLY 
21 Archdale Rd.. Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Vice President 3; Student Government 
Representative 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student Government 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Chair- 
man of Sienna Series 3. 
JUDITH S. DALEY 
470 Brook Rd.. Milton. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3. 
FRANCES E. DERVAN 
12 Brainard St., Hyde Park, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Art Editor of Nursing School Newspaper 
1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student Faculty Organization 4, 

3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Dean's List. 
MARION M. DONAHUE 

76 Lane Dr., Norwood, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2. 1; Library Committee 
4; Senior Ball Committee 4. 
NANCY M. DONOHUE 
1 18 Bays-water St., East Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student Govetnment 
Faculty Organizarion 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; School 
Paper Staff 2, 1. 
KATHLEEN M. DONOVAN 
82-t River St., Matt.ip.in, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Senior Week 
Committee 4; Commencement Committee 3; Dean's List. 
MARY L. DONOVAN 
154 Lowell St., Peabody, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing— Sub Turri 4; Class Presidenr 3; Student 
Council 3; Prefect of Sodality 2; Vice Prefecr of Sodaliry 
1; Sodality 4, 3. 2, 1; Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 
2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Capping Reception Committee 1; 
Commencement Week Committee 3; Dean's List. 
JOYCE M. DWYER 
9 Wesley St.. Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student Government 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1. 
MARGARET MARY EBNER 
59 Grove St.. Thomaston, Conn. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganisation 4, 3, 2; Glee Club 2; Basketball 2; Con- 
necticut Club 2. 
ANNA MARY FAVALORO 
35 Exeter St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; Student Government 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Dean's 
List. 

NANCY L. FIGHTLIN 
41 Buell St., New Britain, Conn. 

B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2; 
Dean's List. 
MARY E. FINEN 
6 Blossom St., Haverhill, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Class Secretary 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1 (Corresponding 
Secretary 2) ; Glee Club 2, 1. 
ANNE M. FINNEGAN 
647 Broadway. Chelsea. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 
PAULINE F. FOGGE 
15 Vera St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2. 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Basketball 2, 1. 



School of Nursing 



PATRICIA JANE GANNON 

196 Faneuil St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3. 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Basketball I. 

KATHLEEN C. GOODHUE 

8 Russell Rd., Brainlree, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Class President 1; Student Council Mem- 
ber 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Organization 
4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Social Service Com- 
mittee 4. 

MARY A. GORMLEY 

Main St., MiUerton, N. Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Social Service Committee. 

MARY A. HALEY 

27^ Market St.. Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 1. 
PATRICIA JANE HALL 
13 Ivy St., East Providence, R. 1. 

B.S. Nursing— Sub Turri 4; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student- 
Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Com- 
mencement Week Committee (Chairman for Nursing 
School); Social Acrivities Committee 2. 
DOROTHY A. HAND 
.527 Hanover St., Manchester, N. H. 
B.S. Nursing — Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3. 2, 

1 (Senior Representative 4, Vice President 3, Recording 
Secretary 2, Corresponding Secretary 1 I ; Student Council 
4, 3, 2, 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Com- 
mencement Ball Committee 4. 

EVELYN 1. HARRINGTON 
55 Bennett St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Chairman of Uni- 
form Committee 4. 
JEANNE MARIE HOAR 
Fort Devens, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3. 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Class Night Gen- 
eral Chairman -t; Ways and Means Committee Chairman 
4; Senior Week Committee 3. 
PATRICIA L. HORNE 

2 Church St., Bradford, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 

gamzation 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2. 1; Freshman Dance 

Committee 1. 

MIRIAM R. HORWITZ 

38 Mason Terr., Brookline, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Honor Board 3; Class Treasurer 1; 

Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 

A. ELLA HURLEY 

18 Sch ussier Rd., Worcester. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Social Activities 
Committee 4, 3 (Chairman 4); Commencemenr Week 
Committee 3; Freshman Prom Committee 1; Dean's List. 
MARGARET A. KANE 
78 Monmouth St., Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 
ANN F. KELEHER 
18 Suburban Rd.. Worcester, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1 (Tteasurer 1, Secre- 
tary 2); Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Basket- 
ball Team 2, 1; Dean's List. 
GAIL M. KENNEY 
5 Sidney St., Dedham, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 
JUDITH M. LYDON 
47 7 Plymouth St.. Abington, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Honor Board 1; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; 
Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2; 
Dance Committee 4, 3, 2; Capping Reception Com- 
mittee 1. 

CATHERINE A. LYNCH 
43 Hyde St., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3; Basketball 2, 1. 
FLORA E. MacDONALD 
175 Churchtlls Lane. Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganizarion 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 
JOAN E. MANNIX 
50 Hunnewell Ave.. Newton. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3. 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Libtaty Committee 
3; Commencement Week Committee 3. 
ROSEMARY A. MAYNE 
i8 Emerson Rd., Winchester, Mass. 

B.S. Nutsing — Sodality 4, 3, 2; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2; Glee Club 2; Commencement Week 
Committee 3. 
MAUREEN McCABE 
540 Lowell Ave.. Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Chairman of Honor Society 4; Sodality 
4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee 
Club 2, 1; Honor Society Committee 4, 3; Capping Re- 
ception Committee 1; Co-Chaitman of Senior Night at 
Pops 4. 



JUDITH K. McGINN 
6 Cameron Rd., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Class Night Com- 
mittee 4; Library Commirtee 1. 

GRACE K. MCLAUGHLIN 

117 East Washington St., Hanson, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Class President 4; Senior Council 4; Class 
Treasurer 3; Honor Board 2; Sodaliry 4. 3, 2, 1; Student 
Faculty Organizarion 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Co- 
Chairman of Commencemenr Week Committee. 

CAROLE E. O'CONNELL 

165 Fairway Dr., West Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Class Secretary 2; Sophomore Council 2; 
Sodality 4. 3. 2, 1; Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 
1; Glee Club 2. 1; Class Night Committee 4; Chairman 
of Nominating Committee 4; Nursing School News- 
paper 1. 

JUDITH A. O'NEIL 

70 Strathmore Rd., Brookline, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Class Treasurer 4; Glee Club Secretary 
2; Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student Faculty Organization 4, 
3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; School of Nursing Class Night 
Chairman 4. 

MARTHA O NEILL 

19 Wain Rd., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Libiary Com- 
mittee 1. 

JACQUELINE M. PERRY 

29 Lover's Leap Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 

SYLVIA C. PIKE 

64 Meagher Ave. . Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Glee Club President 2, 1; Chairman of 
School of Nursing Newspaper 1; Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; 
Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; 

PATRICIA QUINN 

Dedham St.. Wreiitham. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Chairman of Legislative Board 4; Class 
Secretary 3; Sodality 4, 3. 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 1. 

LORRAINE P. RENDA 

19 Sprague St., Maiden, Mass. 

B S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 1; Dance Committee 4; 
Basketball Team 2, 1; Dean's List. 

JANE M. SCHATTLE 

Washington Hgwy.. Lincoln, R. I. 

B.S. Nursing — Class Vice President 4; Senior Class 
Council 4; Chairman of Legislarive Board 3; Sodality 4, 
3 2, 1; Student-Faculty Organization 4. 3. 2, 1; Glee 
Club 2, 1; Rhode Island Club 4,_ 3, 2, 1; Dance Com- 
mittee 2; Basketball Team 2; Dean's List. 

ELEANOR M. SHEA 

1 59 Newport St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodaliry 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4. 3. 2. 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Public Relations 
Committee 4, 2 (Chairman 4); Co-Chairman of Senior 
Ball Committee 4; Basketball 1. 

LOIS E. SOLARI 

49 Leyden St.. East Boston, Mass. 

BS Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2. 1; Basketball Team 

2, 1. 

PAULA SWEET 

9 Edgehill Rd.. Milton. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1. 

NIJOLA TAMOSHAITIS 

86 Webster St.. Brocton. Mass. 

B S. Nursing — Sodaliry 4. 3, 2. 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2. 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Social Activities 
Committee 1. 

KATHLEEN M. TREANOR 
42 Eliot St.. Jamaica Plain. Mass. 

BS Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2. 1; Glee Club 2. 1; Senior Dinner 
Dance Committee 4; Commencement Committee 3; Bas- 
ketball 2. 

JOAN M. VANNIE 

66 Harwich St.. Hartford. Conn. 

B S Nutsing — Chairman of Honor Board 4; Sodality 4. 

3, 2; Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3. 2; Connecticut 
Club 2; Secretary of Public Relations Committee 3; 
Dean's List. 

JUDITH A. WECHTEL 

726 Central Ave.. Woodmere, N. Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Class Secretary 4; Senior Class Council 
4; Class Vice President 2; Sophomote Class Council 2; 
Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Organization 4, 3, 2, 
1; Glee Club 2, 1; Legislative Board 1; Dean's List. 

DOLORES L. WELLING 

1 1 Lynch St., Peabody, Mass. 

BS "Nursing — Sodality 4, 3. 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement 
Week Committee 3. 



359 



ELIZABETH A. WHITE 

74 Fleet St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Co-Chairman of 
Senior Dinner Dance 4; Basketball Team 2; Dean's List. 



MARY E. WILCOX 

288 Underwood St., Fall River, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3, 2, 1; Student-Faculty Or- 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 2, 1; Commencement 
Week Committee. 



RUTH E. WRIGHT 

1 54 Clifton St., Maiden, M. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4 
ganization 4, 3, 2, 1; " 
3; Dean's List. 



Evening School 



RICHARD R. ALEXANDER 

124 Williams St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Intramurals 1 ; Dean's List. 



JAMES E. ANGELINI 

68 Clearwater Dr., Mattapan. Ma 
A.B. Econ ' 



JOHN E. BACCI 

133 Boston Ave.. Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. Philosophy. 

ELLEN E. BARRON 

1 19 Commonwealth Ave.. Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sciences — Sodality 6; Dean's List. 

ELDERIC H. BARRY 

8.58 Broadway. Chelsea, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Dean's List; Bellarmine Speakers 

Club 4, 3. 

JOSEPHINE C. BENINATI 

30 Carleton St., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. Social Science — Dean's List. 

CHARLES O. BENSON 

40 Witherbee Are., Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting. 

WALTER A. BOWES 

4.52 Beech St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Bellarmine Speakers Club 4; 

Dean's List. 

MARY A. BRANNAN 

12 Standish Rd., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Social Science — Dean's List. 

AUDREY L. BURKE 

25 Seymour St., Roslindale, Mass. 
A.B. Social Science. 

MARJORIE E. CASEY 

11 Paradise Rd., Swampscott, Mass. 

B.S. Social Science — Sodality 5, 4, 3, 2 (Secretary); 
Retreat Chairman 3; Class Secretary 3; Student Council 
3; Dean's List. 

GILBERT L. CHARLETTE 

115 Vernal St., Everett, Mass. 
B.S. Economics. 

DOROTHEA C. CLANCY 

20 Maple St., W. Roxhttry, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

HENRY D. CLEMENTS 

34 Maynard St., Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. History — Dean's List. 

MARY THERESA CONNOLLY 

14 Speedwell St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Education — Sodality 6, 4, 3, 2 (Treasurer 4); 

Communion Breakfast Committee 4. 

MARGARET M. CONROY 

54 Manthome Rd., W. Roxbury, Mass. 
B.S. Social Science. 

EDWARD F. COSTIGAN 

12 Emerson Rd., Winthrop, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Dean's List. 

AGNES B. CUMM 

21 Moulton St., Lynn, Mass. 

A.B. English — Sodality 4, 3, 2; Bellarmine Speakers 
Club 6, 5, 4; Communion Breakfast Committee; B.C. 
Eye; Minstral Show; Dean's List. 

NORMA DIBONA 

704 Furnace Brook Pktvy., Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Education — Dean's List. 

JOHN J. DONOVAN 

i9 Mellen St.. Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. General Business. 

CHARLES T. DUFFY 

35 Bernard St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

WILLIAM E. DUNCAN 

85 Boston Ave., Medford, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

MARIE IRENE DUMONT 

21 Chauncy St.. Cambridge, Mass. 

B.S. Social Science — Sodality 4; Bellarmine Speakers 

Club 6, 5. 

PAUL J. FENNELL 

1 1 Beach Ave. , Salem, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government. 

JAMES F. FITZGERALD 

42 Sydney St., Somerville, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

MARILYN IRENE FITZGERALD 

12 Stafford St.. Roxbury, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sciences — Sodality 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 
(Secretary 6); Communion Breakfast Committee 4 
(Chairman); President 4; Secretary 6; B.C. Eye; Min- 
strel Show 6, 5; Freshman Orientation 6, 5; Dean's List. 

JOAN FLYNN 

196 Payson St., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Elementary Education. 

JOHN M. FLYNN 

196 Payson St.. Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science. 



RICHARD K. FOLEY 

615 Washington St., Hollislon. Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

WILLIAM FOLEY 

31 Pleasant St., Dorchester. Mass. 
A.B. History and Government. 

ANNIE K. GARVIN 

40 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass. 

A.B. History and Government. 

ROBERT A. GAUMONT 

130 Sycamore St., Somerville. Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 

CATHERINE M. GILLIS 

20 Kingman Rd., Somerville, Mass. 

A.B. Social Science. 

JAMES E. GLYNN 

122 Aldrich St., Roslindale, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sci 



WILLIAM N. GOUDEY, JR. 
11 Wilbur St., Everett, Mass. 
A.B. History. 

WILLIAM R. GRAY 

7 Fernboro St.. Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting. 

LEO T. GREEN 

37 Munroe St., Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting. 

FREDERIC G. GUARENTE 

21 Page St., Revere, Mass. 
B.S. Economics. 

WILLIAM E. GUARENTE 

I I Village Lane. Arlington, Mass. 
A.B. Economics. 

PATRICIA MARGARET GUNNING 

81 Central Ave.. Milton, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sciences — Sodality 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1; B.C. 

Eye 4; Communion Breakfast Committee 4; Dean's List. 

MARGARET A. HALL 

2 Drummond PL. Cambridge, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

FRANCIS A. HARRINGTON 

40 Brandon St., Lexington, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

DANIEL E. HOGAN 

1562 Centre St., Roslindale, Mass. 
B.S. Economics. 

FRANKLIN DEAN HUNT 

J 07 Adams St., Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

PAUL H. JAEHNIG 

1112 Trapelo Rd., Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 
ROBERT F. KELLEHER 
21 Autumn Cir., Canton, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

PAUL G. KELLEY 

25 College Hill Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 
ANN E. KELLY 
110 High St., Maultus, N.Y. 
B.S, Nursing. 

DANIEL POWER LEAHY 
585 Westford St.. Lowell, Mass. 

A.B. Social Sciences — Class Representative 2; Intra- 
murals; Dean's List. 
BERNICE M. LEMIRE 
210 West Sixth St., Lowell, Mass. 
A.B. English ■ — Dean's List. 

JOSEPH A. MAFFEO 

653 Watertown St., Newlonville, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

ROBERT J. MAGUIRE 

III Kenrick St., Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting. 

FREDERICK JAMES MASON, JR. 

11 Ridgewood St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Dean's List. 

FRANCIS G. MAZZOLA 

35 Winship St., Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Marketing. 

MARY E. MAZZOLA 

69 Pleasant St., W. Newton, Mass. 
B.S. Education. 

GAETANO J. MAZZONE 

18 White St., Lewiston, Maine 

B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 

PATRICIA A. McGUIRK 

700 Antrim St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. English. 

JOHN W. McHUGH 

85 South St.. Bridgewaler, Mass. 

A.B. Economics — Sodality 4, 2, 1; Debating 3, 2, 1; 

Glee Club 2. 1; Intramurals 3, 2, 1. 



als 2, 1; Dean's Lis 



PAUL HENRY McINNIS 

853 East Third St., South Boston. Mass. 

A.B. English — Retreat Committee 4; Minstrel Shov 

Dean's List. 

ROBERT A. McINNIS 

207 North St., Medford. Mass. 

B.S. Natural Science — Bellarmine Speaker's Club 

Dean's List. 

JAMES F. McNEELY 

7 Pleasant St., Derry, N. H. 

A.B. Social Science — Writers' Workshop 2, 1; 

chology Club 2; Dean's List. 

JAMES E. MCNEILL 

39 Mt. Vernon St., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Sociology. 

JAMES G. MEADE, JR. 

19 Alfred Rd., Watertown, Ma. 

B.S. General Business — Intra 

ROBERT W. MEADE 

115 Franklin St., Allston. Mass. 
B.S. English. 

GERALD T. MOORE 

24 Dexter Ave., Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

ROBERT L. MOORE 

i65 Boston Ave., Medford, Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 

JOHN J. MOYNAHAN 

365 Chapman St., Canton, Mass. 
A.B. History and Government. 

DONALD J. MULLIGAN 

387 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

JOHN J. MURPHY 

31 Montello St. Ext., Brocton, Mass. 

B.S. General Business. 

WILLIAM P. MURPHY 

2 Fidelis Way. Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sciences — Class Tr< 

Council Treasurer 6; Bellarmine Speakers Club 5; 

strel Show 6, 5 (Co-Chairman 6); Dean's List. 

WILLIAM J. MURRAY 

j Bay View PL, South Boston, Mass. 

A.B. English — Communion Breakfast Committ 

Treasurer 3; Dean's List. 

ROBERT C. NOLAN 

169 Suffolk Ave., Revere, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

ELENORE M. O'BRIEN 

57 Huron Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Elementary Education. 

ROBERT J. O'CONNELL 

19 Woodworth St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

JAMES M. O'DONNELL 

RFD No. 2, Box 55B, Dover, N. H. 
B.S. General Business. 

MARGARET MARY O'HARA 

197 Heath St., Jamaica Plain. Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Dean's List. 

THOMAS F. O'HEARN 

28 Anthony Rd., Franklin, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 
JAMES A. OROURKE, JR. 
28 Taconia St., Hyde Pari, Mass. 
B.S. Economics. 

BENJAMIN J. OSKIN 

24 Adams Rd., Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Sociology. 

JOHN R. PAPINEAU 

60 Mt. Vernon St., Need ham. Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

THOMAS M. PARLIN 

34 Nesmith St., Laurence, Mass. 
B.S. Social Science. 

MOTHER M. DANIEL PELLETIER 

30 Madison Ave., Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Edu 



JOHN M. PENDER 

40 Oakridge St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Ac 



EDWARD JAMES PF.TTEE 

48 Mil! St., Abington, Mass. 

B.S. Economics — Bellarmine Speakers Club 5 

President) ; Dean's List. 

ELIZABETH M. PHELAN 

5 N. Parish Rd., Lawrence, Mass. 
A.B. Economics — Dean's List. 

RICHARD J. PORT 

115 Clark Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

ROBERT E. POWER 

43 Dobson Rd., Brainlree, Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 



360 



ADELINE C. REILLY 

49 Cranston St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. English — Sodality 3, 2, 1; Dean's List. 

JOHN J. REMONDI 

17 Seminole St., Boston, Mass. 

B.S. Accounting — Halloween Dance 6; Dean's List. 

WILLIAM T. RILEY 

39 Lohnes Rd., Framingham, Mass. 

A.B. Social Sciences — Sodality 6; Bellatmine Speakets 
Club 5; Minsttel Show 6; Sub Turn 6 (Associate Edi- 
tor); Dean's List. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS RIZZO 

894 Shirley St., Wmthrop, Mass. 
B.S. Marketing. 

DOUGLAS J. ROBINSON 

137 Englewood Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

B.S. History — Bellarmine Speakers Club 1. 

JOHN J. ROCHE 

222 Cedar St., Somerville, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Communion Breakfast Com- 
mittee. 

GEORGE D. RYAN 

122 Mill St., Newton, Mass. 
A.B. English. 

THOMAS J. RYAN, JR. 

395 Broadway, Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. General Bu 



JOSEPH R. SARAO 

7 Norman St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Economics. 

PRISCILLA SPEAR 

57 Jobey Rd., Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Education — Sodality 4, 3. 2, 1; Class Secretary 3; 
Communion Breakfast 4. 3. 2, 1: Senior Dinner Dance 
4, 2; Minstrel Show 4, 3; Dean's List. 

ROBERT L. STAFFIER 

1 Maine St.. Maiden, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Dean's List 

DOUGLAS E. STOODLEY 

10 Dexter Rd., Lexington, Mass. 
B.S. History. 

EDWARD H. SULLIVAN 

8j King St., Dorchester, Mass. 

B.S. Social Sciences — Class Ptesident 6, 5; Student 
Council President 6; Bellarmine Speakers Club 6, 5, 4; 
Senior Dinner Dance Chairman 5; Student Council 5; 
Dean's List. 

EDWARD F. SULLIVAN 

131 Vpham St., Melrose, Mass. 
B.S. English. 

SALVATORE L. TRIFIRO 

110 Lonsdale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
B.S. Marketing. 

BERNARD C. VICTORY 

27 Emery St., Methuen, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Bellarmine Speakers Club 4. 



ALPHONSE J. VITALE 

i74 Brown St., Waltham, Ma. 
B.S. Economics — Student Co 



il 1; Dean's Li; 



ROBERTA A. WALSH 

11 Atlantic Ave., Revere, Mass. 

B.S. History and Government — Dean's ] 

JAMES F. WELCH, JR. 

18 Nira Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. General Business — Sodality 1; Cla 
6, 5; Student Council 6, 5 (Vice Presi 
mine Speakers Club 6, 5. 4; Freshma 
(Chairman) ; Minstrel Show 5. 

DAVID G. WHITMAN 

5 Abington St., Hingham, Mass. 
B.S. General Business. 

ELIZABETH A. WILKINSON 

95 Spy Pond Pkwy., Arlington, Mass. 
B.S. Accounting — Dean's List. 

PAUL J. WILLIAMSON 

81 Oak St., Foxboro, Mass. 

B.S. General Business — Dean's List. 

HAROLD R. A. WOODS 

55 Lincoln St., Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Economics — Dean's List. 

THOMAS J. WYNNE 

15 Alcott St., Allston, Mass. 



GENEVIEVE AMIRAULT, R.N. 

Winthrop St., Essex, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARY ANGELORUM, S.P., R.N. 

Providence Mother House, Holyoke, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ANNA ASDOORIAN, R.N. 

152 Vine St., East Providence, R. I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MADELINE MARY BACZEK, R.N. 

47 Aldnch St., Webster, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 3 (Vice Ptefect 3); Student 
Council 4 (Chairman of Activities Committee); English 
Academy 3. 

JUANITA J. BEAUCHESNE, R.N. 

4 Clarence St., Worcester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 3. 

CALIOPE MARION BELEZOS, R.N. 

317 Pond St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

CAROLE G. BELLOTTI, R.N. 

115 Summer St., Arlington, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council 3; Honor Board. 

SISTER MARY BERNADETTE, S.P., R.N. 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARY BERNARD, S.P., R.N. 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ELIZABETH I. BERNIER, R.N. 

509 Morris St., Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARY JOHN BOSCO, S.P., R.N. 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

RUTH MARY BOWERS, R.N. 

42 West 9th St., New York, N. Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; Senior Class Vice Presi- 
dent. 

HELEN L. BURNS, R.N. 

1 03 Summer St., Maiden, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

CLARENCE L. BUTTS, R.N. 

168 Middle St., Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

CAROL MARIE CAMPBELL, R.N. 

1 55 Lyons St., New Britain, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing. 

BIBIANA CANNALONGA, R.N. 

43 Lake St., Webster, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Senior Class Secretary-Treasurer; English 
Academy 3 (Secretary). 

ELAINE L. CAPOZZOLI, R.N. 
61 Brookside Dr., Cranston, R, I. 
B.S. Nursing — Student Council (Activities Committee). 

CATHERINE NANCY CAPRON, R.N. 

82 Abbe Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4; English Academy 4. 

MARGARET ANN CARMODY, R.N. 

5 Van Anden St., Auburn, N. Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

NANCY M. CARR, R.N. 

55 Prospect St., Franklin, N. H. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 3. 

SARAH CATHERINE CARROLL, R.N. 

21 Elm St., Massena, N. Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; English Academy 4, 3. 



Graduate Nursing 

ROBERTA ANN CARUSO, R.N. 

19 Bates Rd., Manchester, Conn. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council 4 (Public Relations 

Committee). 

EVELYN CASSARA, R.N. 

550 Woodstock Ave., Stratford, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER CATHERINE, S.G.M., R.N. 
1575 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SYLVIA CIMPI, R.N. 

14 Shearin St., Auburn, N. Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

NANCY PATRICIA CORCORAN, R.N. 

37 Earle St., Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARY CORITA, S.M.S.M., R.N. 

863 Central St., Framingham Center, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

VIRGINIA A. CROWLEY, R.N. 

15 Mendon St., Worcester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

HELEN M. CURLEY, R.N. 

12 Rockdale Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

HELEN ELIZABETH CURTIN, R.N. 

27 Ocean Ave., Salem, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3 (Counselor 3); Student 

Council 3 (Vice President); English Academy 4, 3. 

MARGARET ANN CURTIN, R.N. 

500 Seattle St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3. 

CLAIRE CAVANAUGH DAILEY, R.N. 

37 Broadmoor Rd., Cranston, R. I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ROSE MARIE DeBALSI, R.N. 

167 Messer St., Providence, R. I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JACQUELYN DEEGAN, R.N. 

18 Kendall Ave., Attleboro, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JANET DEAN DONOHUE, R.N. 

23 Strawberry Hill Rd., Natick, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 

VIRGINIA ANN DOOLING, R.N. 

21 Carver St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARIE ELIZABETH, S.P., R.N. 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

PATRICIA ALAYNE ESPOSITO, R.N. 

320 Eastern Pkwy., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council 3 (Social Activities 

Committee) . 

ELIZABETH THERESA FAHEY, R.N. 

259 Pearl St., Newton, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3; English Academy 3; Ger- 
man Academy 4; Student Council 4 (Secretary). 

GLENDA FARRELL, R.N. 

197 Arsenal St., Watertown, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3 (Treasurer 4); Library 
Committee 4, 3; English Academy 4, 3 (Publicity Chair- 
man 4 ) . 

NANCY AMELIA FERNANDES, R.N. 

Wareham Rd., Marion, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 3; Student Council 4, 3; 

Senior Class President; Junior Class President; English 

Academy 4. 



CAROL ANN FORD, R.N. 

321 Weymouth St., Holbrook, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3 (Council 4); Sodality 

Newspaper 4 (Co-Editor); Sub Turri 4 (Associate Edi- 

ALICE GADOURY, R.N. 

195 Talcott St., Woonsockel, R. I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ANNETTE ZELMA GAGNE, R.N. 

5 Pennacook St., Newport, R. 1. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SARAH J. GIBSON, R.N. 
23 Carey St., Monrovia, Liberia 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4. 

MARCIA ANN GILLESPIE, R.N. 

277 Dale St., Waltham, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JEAN MARIE GRADY, R.N. 

10 Wilson St., Leominster, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

CAROLYN MARY GREEN, R.N. 

7 Adams St., Auburn, N. Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

THERESA A. GWOZDZ, R.N. 

29 Morris St., Webster, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ALICE DOWDALL HAMILTON, R.N. 

191 Kent St., Srookline, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JOAN E. HARRINGTON, R.N. 

9 Rice St., Brookline, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JUNE MARIE HARRINGTON, R.N. 

157 Mauran Ave., East Providence, R. I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

BARBARA ANN HENNESSEY, R.N. 
Lakeview Rd., Foxboro, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARGARET MARY HOPPER, R.N. 

22 Hawley St., Newtngton, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3. 

SISTER MARY IDA, S.M.S.M., R.N. 
863 Central St., Framingham Center, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

VIRGINIA JACKSON, R.N. 

37 Oliver Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

BARBARA JOYCE, R.N. 

112 Tyndale St., Roshndale, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ANN ELIZABETH KELLY, R.N. 

110 High St., Manlins, N.Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

AGNES KEOHANE, R.N. 

50 Woodward Ave., Brockton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JUNKO MARIA KONDO, R.N. 

30 Warren St., Brighton 35, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARY PELL KHOURY, R.N. 

32 Wilder St., Brockton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARJORIE JANE LANGWAY, R.N. 

1608 Memorial Ave., West Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. General Nursing. 

FRANCES McKINNON LEAHY, R.N. 

75 Townsend St., Worchcstcr, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing. ^ 



MARGARET JANE LENNON, R.N. 

247 Howard Ave., Elberon, N.J. 

B.S. Nursing. 

BARBARA G. LEONARD, R.N. 

5 Belmont St., Pawtucket, R.I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ESTELLE LOMBARDI. R.N. 

58 Central Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

LEVIA ANNE LUGARESI, R.N. 
44 Eighteenth Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

KATHRYN ANNE MacQUEEN, R.N. 
136 Winfield Ave.. Jersey City, N.J. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3 (Sodality Council 4); 
Student Council 3 (Finance Committee); Co-Editor of 
Sodality Newspaper 4. 
ELLEN FRANCES MADDEN, R.N. 
260 Phoenix Ave., Cranston, R.I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARY MAGDALEN, S.P.. R.N. 
Providence Mother House, Holyoke, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

PATRICIA M. MANN, R.N. 
1210 Commercial St., E. Weymouth, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Student Council 3 (Nominating Com- 
mittee) . 

IRENE LOUISE MARTEL, R.N. 
Pine St., Webster, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3. 
SISTER CATHERINE MARY, S.G.M., R.N. 
1575 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER ROSE MARY, C.S.S.J., R.N. 
56 franklin St., Waterbury, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing. 

DEIRDRE JOAN McAULIFFE, R.N. 
1993 Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ELLEN C. MCCARTHY, R.N. 
14 Perkin Sq., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARGARET McCLUSKEY, R.N. 
8 Kelleran St., Halton, Maine 
B.S. Nursing. 

JOAN CAROL McGINNIS, R.N. 
1 1 Van Buren St., Providence, R.I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARY ELLEN McGOWAN, R.N. 
34 North Allen St., Albany, N.Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARY ANN McGRATH, R.N. 
147 East 4th St., Oswego, N.Y. 
B.S. Nursing. 

FRANCES McLEAN, R.N. 

10 Beaufort Rd., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing. 

VIRGINIA DESNEW McMAHON, R.N. 

61-05 39th Ave., Woodside, N. Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3 (Council 4, Secretary 3). 

SISTER MARIE ELIZABETH, S.P., R.N. 
(McNAMARA) 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing. 

MARCELLINE MARY McSWEENEY, R.N. 

281 Hoosick St., Troy, N.Y. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 

CYNTHIA ROSE MELLO, R.N. 

245 North St., Salem, Mass. 

B.S Nursing — Sodality 4; Student Council 4 (Honor 

Board Chairman). 

FLORENCE MICHAUD, R.N. 

151 David St., New Bedford, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; English Academy 4, 3; 

Srudent Council 4 ( Nominating Committee) . 



ROSALIE ELIZABETH MIELNICKI, R.N. 

6 Taft St.. Uxbridge. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4, 3. 

BERNADINE NATALIE MILLER, R.N. 

6,7 South Boulevard St., West Springfield. Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

VIRGINIA M. MOSTYN, R.N. 
67 V as sail St., Wollaslon, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

BRENDA M. MOYNAHAN, R.N. 
rti Blake St.. Springfield. Mass. 

BS Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; English Academy 3; Stu- 
dent Council 4, 3 (Class Representative 3, President 4). 

SHEILA MONICA MULHOLLAND, R.N. 

J -4 5 Oakdale Ave., Pawtucket. R.I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARGOT MULLIN, R.N. 

Oak St.. Lincrofl, N.J. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ELEANOR MURPHY. R.N. 

155 Bond St., Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MAJORIE ANN O'BRIEN, R.N. 
19 Pleasant St., Baldwinville. Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council 4 (Class Represent- 
ative) ; English Academy 4. 
MARY THERESA O'BRIEN, R.N. 
Preston St., Hartford, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 

IVY B. O'DONNELL, R.N. 

81 Swan St., Everett, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing. 

ANN THERESE O'NEIL, R.N. 

179 Fairview Are.. Belmont, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4; English Academy 4; Student 

Council 4 (Library Committee Chairamn). 

RITA HELEN O'NEILL, R.N. 

290 Admiral St., Providence, R.I. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARGARET ANTON O'SULLIVAN, R.N. 

715 Belmont St., Belmont, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MADELINE C. PAPILE, R.N. 

56 Keating St., Quincy, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER PATRICIA, S.G.M., R.N. 
1575 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ELIZABETH ANNE PENDERGAST, R.N. 

6 Day St., Norwood, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

RITA M. PLUMMER, R.N. 

58 Broadway St., Stoneham, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 3. 

PATRICIA LEE POQUETTE, R.N. 

Alburg, Vermont 
B.S. Nursing. 

BARBARA JANE RASICOT, R.N. 

293 Bank St., Seymour, Conn. 

B.S. Nursing — Student Council 4 ( Class Represent 

ative). 

MARY H. REGAN, R.N. 

1 7 Broadway. Somerrille, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARY REMIGIUS, S.P., R.N. 

103 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

SISTER MARIA REPARATA, S.P., R.N. 

103 Commonwealth Are.. Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JUDITH ANNE ROBILLARD, R.N. 

Central St.. Pascoag, R.I. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 



MILDRED ANNE ROCHE, R.N. 
32 Rosedale St., Portland. Maine 
B.S. Nursing. 

LEONA ALFREDA ROUSSEAU, R.N. 

179 Brown St.. Waltham, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4; Student Council i (Library 



MARIALYSE L. ROY, R.N. 

95 Marble St., Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4; English Academy -i; French 

Club 3. 

ALICE E. RYAN, R.N. 

Toner Rd.. South Lincoln. Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4. 

JOAN ELLEN RYAN, R.N. 
46 Arden Rd.. Watertown, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

JOSEPHINE E. SAGEBEER, R.N. 

189 Wood Pond Rd.. Hartford, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 4. 

REIKO B. SAWA, R.N. 

iO Warren St.. Brighton, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

DOROTHY L. SEXTON, R.N. 

116 Piatt St., Ansonia, Conn. 
B.S. Nursing. 

LENA SILVA, R.N. 
1754 Lonsdale Ave.. Lincoln, R.I. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; Junior Class Vice Presi- 
dent; English Academy 4. 

MARIE BOWMAN SIMPSON, R.N. 

4 Timber Lane, Methuen, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

CAROL BARBARA SMITH, R.N. 

656 Slocum Ave.. Ridgefield, N.J. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3 ( Council 3 ) . 

HARRIET R. STEVENS, R.N. 
29 North Main St., Salem, N.H. 
B.S. Nursing. 

LORELLE MARIA ST. PIERRE, R.N. 

116 Stratton Rd., Jaffrey, N.H. 

B.S. Nursing— Sodality 4, 3 (Prefect 4); Class Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 3. 

DOROTHEA A. STULTZ, R.N. 

14 Loring St., Worcester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

MARY P. SULLIVAN, R.N. 

129 Poplar St., Roslindale 31, Mass. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4, 3; English Academy 4, 3; 

Committee on Public Relations 4 ( Chairman) . 

MARYAN THERESA SURMAN, R.N. 

35 Park Dr., Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

CATHERINE TOWER, R.N. 

121 Boylston St., Shrewsbury, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 

ELIZA JANE VANHOOK, R.N. 

360 Henshaw St.. Leicester, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing — English Academy 3. 

PATRICIA DURKIN VISCARDI, R.N. 

19 Van Nostrand Ave., Jersey City, N.J. 

B.S. Nursing — Sodality 4; Student Council 4, 3 (Ways 

and Means Committee Chairman 4). 

MARGARET D. WAYMAN, R.N. 

Jefferson Rd., Jefferson, O. 
B.S. Nursing. 

BERNADINE WOJTANOWSKI, R.N. 

il Brimmer St., Boston, Mass. 
B.S. Nursing. 



AMER1CO ZERNERI, R.N. 

17 Arrowhead Rd., No. Bellingb.. 
B.S. Nursing. 



362 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

STUDENT SENATE 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

STUDENT SENATE 



Compliments of 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

STUDENT SENATE 



363 




Best Wishes 
from 

GOVERNOR 
FOSTER F0RC0L0 



Compliments of 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 
EDWARD J. McCORMACK JR. 

and the members of his staff who are 
graduates of Boston College : — 

JOHN J. COFFEY DANIEL P. KILEY, JR. 

CHARLES E. FRAZIER, JR. JOSEPH F. LYONS 

DAVID S. HOAR PAUL G. O'HARA 

JOHN E. RYAN 



364 



BEST WISHES 



of 

V. P. ROBERTS & CO. 



Congratulations to the Class of '60 



THE NEW YORK CLUB OF BOSTON COLLEGE 



Moderator — REV. GEORGE LAWLOR, S.J. 



Gerald E. Aneskewich President 

Anthony B. Cashman, Jr Vice-President 

Mary-Ellin Browne Secretary 



Thomas E. Farrell Treasurer 

Louis P. Verde Sergeant-at-Arms 

William W. Kingsbury, III Sergeant-at-Arms 



Best Wishes to the Class of 1960 

ACCOUNTING ACADEMY 
1959—1960 

Joseph F. Fennelly, President 

Donald Marsden, V.-Pres. 

Paul Rigazio, Treas. 

Charles Hayes, Sec. 

Professor Arthur L. Glynn, Faculty Moderator 



365 



You Can't Make a Mistake on Any 
Purchase You Make at . . . 

A&P 



This is more than a promise — it's a guarantee 
that you'll never risk a penny on any item you 
buy at A&P. At A&P the sale is never completed 
until you're completely satisfied. The sale must 
measure up to your every expectation — or A&P 
will promptly refund your money — no questions 
asked. 

You can't make a mistake on any purchase you 
make at — 



A&P SUPER MARKETS 



366 



MOVING 




STORKS^ ££^ SHIPPING 

Established 1896 

Exclusive Metropolitan Boston Agent: 
AERO MAYFLOWER TRANSIT COMPANY, INC. 

World-wide Service 

• 

3175 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 30, MASS. 

• 

HAncock 6-8000 JAmaica 2-3300 CAnton 6-2860 

OLympic 3-0400 Pioneer 4-1820 



Compliments of 

E.F.P. BURNS -NC 

Formal Clothes for Rental 

(pur excellence) 

* 

100 SUMMER STREET 

Phones: LI 2-3572 and DE 8-8033 

* 

PAUL E. P. BURNS, B.C. 1953 



367 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



A FRIEND 



ON BEAUTIFUL LAKE JACKSON 

STAY AT 

SUNSET BEACH MOTEL 

SEBRING, FLORIDA 

On Routes 17 and 98 to Miami 



Liberty 2-5252 



^jr. ^rroran \^o. 



DRAPERIES 



85 ESSEX STREET BOSTON 11, MASS. 



368 




ceo' 



» • and won't it be your photograph that you and your grandchildren look for first? 

That's a lot of looking ahead, but it illustrates the permanence... 

the interest... of a fine photograph. Fine photographs of you are our concern 

...a photograph you will proudly give as a personal 

present... a photograph you will look back on happily years from now. 

We hope that when you want a fine photograph taken again, 

you entrust it to us— your official school photographer. 

PHOTO REFLEX STUDIO . . . FLOOR 




filene's 



369 



/E\ 




[*[ flndover raj 


Best of Success to the Class of 1960 


^%S^ 


from 


Tailors and Furnishers 

22 HOLYOKE STREET CAMBRIDGE 
127 MAIN STREET ANDOVER 


Quincy Motor Co., Inc. 

LEO DARR, President 




Ford, Falcon, Thunderbird 

South Shore's Oldest and Largest Ford Dealer 




Carbon Papers — Inked Ribbons 
Unimasters — Duplicating Supplies 


RICHARD L. DARR CBA '60 


PANAMA-BEAVER 




OF NEW ENGLAND, INC. 


85 QUINCY AVE. QUINCY 69, MASS. 


99 BEDFORD ST. BOSTON, MASS. 


PResident 3-6500 


E. C. COMMANDER, Branch Manager 






STadium 2-0240 — 2-5307 Sanders Rented 


Compliments 


HOME SUPPLY CO. 




Hardware - Paints - Wallpaper - Linoleums 


of 


Free Delivery 




ELI SOKOLOVE 


DeMAMBRO 
RADIO SUPPLY CO. 


366 WASHINGTON ST. BRIGHTON, MASS. 


DIAMOND UNION STAMP WORKS 


INCORPORATED 






Plaques and Engraving 




81 WASHINGTON STREET 




BOSTON, MASS. 



370 



Compliments 



of 



THE 

TAM O'SHANTER 

ROOM 



1648 BEACON STREET 



BROOKLINE, MASS. 



JAMES D. MELLEN, President 
JAMES YPHANTIS, Manager 



371 





Compliments of 


Light Provided For Your Education 


THE INTERNATIONAL FRATERNITY OF 


by 


DELTA SIGMA PI 


MASSACHUSETTS 


A Professional Fraternity in the Field of 


GAS & ELECTRIC LIGHT 


Commerce and Business Administration 


SUPPLY CO. 

116 CANAL ST. 193 FRIEND ST. 








Best Wishes 


BOSTON, MASS. 




Other Stores 


TERRENOVA BROS. BARBER SHOP 


LYNN, NEW BEDFORD, WATERTOWN, 


372 WASHINGTON STREET 


PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 


BRIGHTON 35, MASS. 


WM. J. COX FUNERAL HOME 




JOHN J. GREENE — '31 


SULLIVAN D. C. & CO., INC. 


Licensed Funeral Director 




431 TRAPELO RD. BELMONT, MASS. 


Specialists In 


IV 4-0133 






INDUSTRIAL SECURITY 

UNDERCOVER OPERATORS 


FOR OIL OR BURNER SERVICE 


Call 






• GUARDS • 


GAETA BROS. OIL CO. 




24 Hour Service 


24 HOUR SERVICE 


12 CURVE STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 


11 PEMBERTON SQ. CApitol 7-0349 


TW 3-8014 





372 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 



PHILOMATHEIA 
CLUB 



Women's Auxiliary 

of 

Boston College 



MRS. V. P. ROBERTS, President 



373 



H. C. W3INWRIGHT % CO. 


Congratulations 


Established 1868 


CLASS OF 1960 


Members 


JOSEPH R. CARTY 


Boston and New York Stock Exchanges 


SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT 


INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

60 State Street 1 20 Broadway 
Boston New York 




TALLINO'S 


Casco Bank Building Amoskeag Bank Building 
Portland, Maine Manchester, N. H. 


AT CHESTNUT HILL 


804 Main Street 7 Main Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. Keene, N. H. 


Dining Room — Cocktail Lounge 


Hospital Trust Building Northshore Shopping Center 
Providence, R. I. Peabody, Mass. 


BE 2-1749 Frank B. Tallino, Pies. '30 


RUBY NEWMAN ORCHESTRAS 


Compliments of 


400 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 




BOSTON, MASS. 


FRANK A. FOWLER 


Bill Crosby Ruby Newman 


"The College Ring Man" 




27 SCHOOL ST. 


LeBLANC'S FURNITURE STORE 


BOSTON 8, MASS. 


and LeBLANC'S FLOOR COVERING 






Richmond 2-0161 


92 - 98 - 102 LAFAYETTE ST. SALEM, MASS. 




Appliances — T.V. — ■ Hi Fi's — Furniture 


Representing Herff-Jones Co. — Murchison Div. 


Wall to Wall — Rugs, etc. 





374 



Best Wishes from 

TEDESCHI'S SUPER MARKETS 

Famous for the Finest! 
Finest Meat Sold Anywhere 

• BRAINTREE • HULL 

• HANOVER • BROCKTON 

• ROCKLAND • PLYMOUTH 

• KINGSTON 


MANHATTAN JEWELERS 

ONE MAIN STREET 

WATERTOWN SQUARE 

Watertown's Leading jewelers 
Complete Diamond Selection 


KELLY'S 
PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 

389 WASHINGTON STREET 
BRIGHTON CENTRE 


ACOUSTICAL CONTRACTORS INC. 

80 HOLTON ST. BRIGHTON 35, MASS. 

Sta 2-9496 

Sales — Design — Engineering — Installations 

of 

ACOUSTICAL PRODUCTS 

by 

OWENS CORNING FIBERGLAS 

SIMPSON LOGGING COMPANY 

Sound Control is a Sound Investment 


Compliments of 

NOVAK'S 

Towne Terrace 

1700 BEACON STREET 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 

Luncheons — Dinners 
Banquets 


TWELVE-EIGHTY INC. 

Restaurant — Lounge 

1280 BEACON STREET BROOKLINE 
John H. O'Connell 



375 



Repointing and W 'at et -proofing 

Leaking Masonry Walls Above Ground 

Building Cleaning — Birdproofing 

WESTERN WATERPROOFING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Boston 18 New York 17 Albany 2 


ALFRED F. DeSCENZA 
& SON, Inc. 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS 
and JEWELERS 

Since 1915 

♦ 
387 WASHINGTON STREET 

ROOM 609 BOSTON, MASS. 

♦ 

Engagement Rings Our Specialty 

♦ 

Special Consideration Given to B.C. Men 


CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1960 

BLESSED OLIVER PLUNKETT 
SOCIETY 


SERVICE UNIFORM 
COMPANY, Inc. 

1 5 SCHOOL STREET BOSTON, MASS. 
CApitol 7-0670 


Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 


Outfitters of Boston College 
R.O.T.C. 


CONTRACT SALES, INC. 

• INTERIOR * HOSPITALS 
FURNISHINGS 

• OFFICES * CHURCHES 

• BANKS * HOTELS 

• INSTITUTIONS * RESTAURANTS 

• SCHOOLS * CLUBS 

• COLLEGES * CAFETERIAS 

• DORMITORIES * FACTORIES 

KE 6-1515 
713 BEACON STREET BOSTON, MASS. 


ATTENTION GRADUATING SENIORS: 

See Us for Your Uniform Needs 

and Accessories on 

Going Into Active Service 



376 



FANDEL PRESS, INC. 




Complete Printing Service 


BOSTON COLLEGE 


▲ 


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 




CHESTNUT HILL 67 




MASSACHUSETTS 


59 McBRIDE STREET 




JAMAICA PLAIN 30, MASS. 


I 


JAmaica 4-0204 — 4-0205 




Boston's 




Distinctive Store 




(SBS*i 


M. B. FOSTER 


ffl^pte 


ELECTRIC COMPANY 


,^^l5^3§^^fe. 




Famous for 


• 


Good Foods and Delicacies 




S. S. PIERCE CO. 

Stores in Boston, Belmont, Wellesley, Northshore, 


368 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 


Brookline and Newton 




Mail and Telephone Orders 




PATRICK J. GILL & SONS INC. 

Religious Gifts for All Occasions 




MWMHMMMhM Miff 




^^m 


* ^ ",W 1 _■.:■■ ." ;'-.: ;.' ; ;;' 




Memorial Chalice and Ciboriums 


^■""i!' .■ ■ .'Mb 






Factory and Sales 
9 Fowle St., Woburn, Mass. 


^:-:^#;^5^. 


(PP^ ^3i;f a« v i»v';> ! " ;<: 




For the Finest Rental Formal Wear 




Sales 
387 Washington St., Room 709, Boston, Mass. 


CUMMINS MEN'S STORE 

19 POPLAR STREET ROSLINDALE SQ. 




FA 5-7970 



377 



EDMAND'S COFFEE CO. 

68 INDIA STREET 
BOSTON 10, MASS. 


ALLEN STATIONERY CO. 

103 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. BOSTON 
KEnmore 6-1161 

"Complete Office Equipment" 

Printing - Typewriters - Adding Machines 

School Supplies 


fKjl ST. PAUL CATHOLIC BOOK 
jP|% AND FILM CENTER 

!11E! ® !1!S!L Bibles, Missals, Prayerbooks 

Books on Theology, Mariology, Apologetics, 

Spiritual Reading and Meditation 

Lives of the Saints, Biographies, etc. 

16mm Films, Filmstrips, Religious Articles 

Center Operated by Daughters of St. Paul 

315 WASHINGTON ST. 381 DORCH. ST. 

BOSTON, MASS. SO. BOSTON, MASS. 

CA. 7-5414 AN. 8-8811 


Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 


BEST OF LUCK 

to the 
CLASS OF 1960 

from the 

GOLD KEY SOCIETY 

"SERVICE and SACRIFICE" 


WESTON NURSERIES, INC. 

Growers of New England's finest nursery stock. Over 300 

acres under cultivation. Our Garden Center is supplied 

with plants grown in our nursery plus a full selection of 

lawn and garden needs. 

ROUTE 135 Tel. Hopkinton ID 5-3414 
HOPKINTON, MASS. Wellesley CE 5-3431 



378 



Howland Linen Supply Co. 
INCORPORATED 

40 BRISTOL STREET 

BOSTON 18, MASS. 

Hancock 6-6630 

73 CHANCERY STREET 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

Tel. Wyman 2-4981 

CORNER RT. No. 28 and BEARSE'S WAY 
HYANNIS, MASS. 

Tel. Spring 5-2245 


HIGHAM, NEILSON, 
WHITRIDGE & REID, INC 

50 CONGRESS STREET 
BOSTON 9, MASSACHUSETTS 

Designer and Administrator of 
YOUR STUDENT INSURANCE PROGRAM 

Serviced Locally by 
CHARLES F. MURPHY, INC. 

24 School Street 
Boston 9, Massachusetts 


CORBIN - SCHLAGE 

— Dealer — 

CAMPBELL HARDWARE, INC. 

REAR 274 CENTRE STREET 
NEWTON 58, MASS. 


E. T. RYAN IRON WORKS, INC. 

Established 1917 
Specializing in 

NO-BOLT STAIR CONSTRUCTION 

Ornamental Iron, Bronze and 

Aluminum Work 

• 

Telephones: Stadium 2 

3418, 3419, 3180 

E. T. RYAN "1910", President and Treasurer 

19 Braintree Street Allston Station 

BOSTON 34, MASSACHUSETTS 


LAKE STREET BOOK STORE 

♦ 

2193 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 
BRIGHTON 35, MASSACHUSETTS 


Good Food for Over 25 Years 

LUTHER WITHAM, INC. 

Caterers 
441 CHATHAM ST. LYNN, MASS. 



379 



BRADFORD HOTEL 

BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 

Headquarters for Functions of 
All Types and Sizes 
Boston's most extensive and complete 
function facilities. Healthfully air- 
conditioned for your added comfort. 

Home of BRADFORD ROOF 

unusual night club-restaurant 

Dancing — Floor Shows 

ft 

For further information, contact the 

Function Department, HAncock 6-1400 

Robert N. Appleton, Manager 


Compliments of 

BOSTON FUEL TRANSPORT INC. 

36 NEW STREET 
EAST BOSTON 28, MASSACHUSETTS 


TYPEWRITERS . . . ADDING MACHINES 

Rentals — Sales — Service 

PETER PAUL 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

TW 3-8920 
1 1 PINE ST. WALTHAM, MASS. 


ALVORD PHARMACY 

(HAHN DRUG STORE, INC.) 
Carl H. and John C. Alvord, Reg. Pharmacists 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

105 UNION ST. NEWTON CENTRE, MASS. 
BIgelow 4-0760 Emergency — BI 4-0360 


EDWARD S. QUIRK 
& COMPANY 

QUALITY TIRES 

QUALITY RECAPS 

QUALITY REPAIRS 

• 

Emergency Service . . . 
Nights, Sundays and Holidays 

Tel. WA 4-8700 

• 

275 ARSENAL 
WATERTOWN, MASS. 


M. J. Flaherty Company 

Mechanical Contractors 

29 WAREHAM ST. BOSTON 18, MASS. 
Telephone HUbbard 2-4920 

Victor J. Galleni, Pres. Frederick J. Casey, Treas. 

Heating - Ventilating - Air Conditioning 

Power and Process Piping - Cooling Systems 

Oil Burners 

♦ 

Member of 

Mechanical Contractors Association of America, Inc. 

National Certified Pipe Welding Bureau 



380 



BEST WISHES 

to the 
CLASS OF I960 

• 

SULLIVAN BROS. 

PRINTERS 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 


M. S. 
KELLIHER COMPANY 

General Contractors 

Builders 

Industrial — Commercial 

LAfayette 3-7250 — 1 — 2 — 3 

10 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 


REARDON and TURNER 

150 CAUSEWAY STREET 
BOSTON 14, MASSACHUSETTS 

• 

REGISTERED 

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS 
BUILDING SERVICES 


COURTEOUS • DEPENDABLE 
TAXICAB SERVICE 

BOSTON CAB 


Il><^\ /fpHifa^ 


^jJIflJ,'^ V^h 


KEnmore 6-5010 



381 



Compliments of 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

First Professional Business Fraternity 
First on the Boston College Campus 



TIMPANY ELEVATOR COMPANY 

22 CUSTOM HOUSE STREET 

BOSTON, MASS. 

O 

J. A. Timpany '43, General Manager 



To The Boston College 
CLASS OF '60 

Our Very Best Wishes Now and 
for the future 



The Sheraton- Plaza 

BOSTON 

H. de F. "Dan" Nyboe 
General Manager 



Elbery Motor Co., Inc. 

Ford — Falcon — Thunderbird 

Sales and Service 

360 RIVER ST. CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

KI 7-3820 



Open Evenings 

Over 30 Years a Leader in Ford Sales 

in New England 



B. L. MAKEPEACE, INC. 

Artists' Supplies — Engineers' Equipment 
Drafting Materials 

KEUFFEL & ESSER — HAMILTON — WEBER 

Photostating — Offset Printing 

Blue Printing — Plan Reproductions 

1266 Boylston Street Boston 15, Mass. 

COpley 7-2700 



FRANCIS H. CURTIN 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Insurance and Bonds 

689 CONCORD AVE. CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
Telephone University 4-4780 



382 



BOSTON CHAIN LINK 
FENCE CO. 

350 ADAMS STREET 

DORCHESTER, MASS. 

o 

Expert Erectors 

o 

Tennis Courts — Backstops 
Fences of All Types 

TA 5-1 800 GE 6-6680 GE 6-6681 

WILLIAM A. ENGLISH '49 
Sales Manager 


CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '59 

FORMAL WEAR 

by 

jJI» ^CCL(1929) 
M^HFm Special Rates to 

1 I * THE RIGHT FIT 
ft?, • THE RIGHT LOOK 
j I • THE RIGHT SERVICE 

LA 7-9339 
44 LANGLEY ROAD • NEWTON CENTRE 


JOHN F. CLUNAN 
New York Life Insurance Co. 

Specializing in Estate Planning and Life Insurance 

Bus.: HUbbard 2-4900 
Res.: NOrmandy 5-3314 

75 FEDERAL STREET BOSTON, MASS. 
3 HUNNEWELL ST. MELROSE, MASS. 


Compliments 
of 

PANELLA'S 
PLUMBING & HEATING 


L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

"Known wherever there are Schools and Colleges" 

CLASS RINGS and PINS 

Commencement Invitations - Diplomas 

Personal Cards - Club Insignia - Medals & Trophies 

♦ 

Mr. William F. Frazier, Representative 

♦ 

1103 STATLER OFFICE BUILDING 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

PEPSI-COLA 



383 



Congratulations to 
THE CLASS OF I960 

See you at the "OG" 
where you're only a stranger once 




Fine Foods and Imported Liquors 

36 CHURCH ST. HARVARD SQUARE 

CAMBRIDGE 38, MASS. 



WALSH BROTHERS 



Contractors 



150 HAMPSHIRE STREET 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
TR 6-0375 



McNAMARA 
FUNERAL HOME 



460 WASHINGTON STREET 

(at Lake St.) 

BRIGHTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Bernard S. McNamara, Director 



BEST WISHES 
from 

SOCIETY FOR 

ADVANCEMENT 

OF MANAGEMENT 



FIRST PLACE WINNERS . . 
NATIONAL COMPETITION 



384 





HOMES 


David H. Leahy John F. Leahy 


DIRECT MAIL SERVICE 




Resumes 




Circulars - Posters - Letterheads 


BOSTON TEXTILE CO. 


Envelopes - Postcards - Mailing 
Printing for Club Activities 




All Done by Offset 


♦ 


66 CHURCH ST. CAMBRIDGE 


Institutional Dry Goods 




(Harvard Square) TR 6-2287 




Convent Supplies — Postulant Requirements 


THE MARSHARD ORCHESTRAS 




The Outstanding Favorite of 


♦ 


America's Universities 




73 NEWBURY ST. BOSTON 


93 SUMMER ST. BOSTON 10, MASS. 


KEnmore 6-5173 


Liberty 2-8630 


NEW YORK BAR HARBOR 


Reserved for 




ANDREW T.JOHNSON CO. , INC. 




4 


3 J 15 TREMONT PLACE 






IN 103 NEWBURY STREET 


CLASS OF "60" 
A Quiet-Test in the '60 Oldsmobile 




LOCATIONS 


BOSTON ( 173 MILK STREET 




/Ttutoaacctty 




NEW ENGLAND'S NEWEST AND LARGEST 




COMPLETE PLANT UNDER ONE ROOF IN 


nminbem r 
Drdintree wc - 

OLDSMOBILE 


BURLINGTON, MASS. ON MIDDLESEX TURNPIKE 
(AT EXIT 35 OFF RT. 128) 


REPRODL 


TEL. BR 2-3070 


JCTIONS OF ALL TYPES 




* BLUEPRINTING 




• PHOTOSTATS 




•OFFSET PRINTING 




• WHITE PRINTING 




• DRAWING MATERIALS 


20 Granite St. Rte. 37 Braintree 


• MICROFILMING 




• MINIATURIZATION 


VI 3-2100 


• CAMERA ENLARGEMENTS 




(UP TO 60 x 120' IN ONE PIECE) 




Richmond 2-1610 - CONNECTING ALL PLANTS 



385 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1961 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1962 



Compliments of 

THE CLASS OF 1963 



386 



TRAVEL Is Our Business (Not a Sideline) 

Whatever Your Needs You Deserve The Best 

Let Oar Travel Experience Be Your Guarantee of 

Personal Satisfaction 

AIR — STEAMSHIP — HOTEL 

Tour and Cruise Reservations the World Over 

BASSETT TOUR & TRAVEL BUREAU 

24 MAIN ST. HAVERHILL, MASS. 

DR 4-6301 

World-Wide Travel Specialists Since 1895 


BEST OF LUCK 
TO THE CLASS OF I960 

FROM 

The Campus Council 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Established 1902 — Incorporated 1911 

GEORGE F. DRISCOLL COMPANY 

General Contractors • Building Construction 

41 EAST 42nd STREET NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 
MUrray hill 7-4200 

— BUILDERS OF — 

MARTYRS' COURT 
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 

GYMNASIUM 
CRANWELL PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

PHARMACY-SCIENCE BUILDING 
ST. JOHNS UNIVERSITY 

FACULTY RESIDENCE 
ST. JOHNS UNIVERSITY 

SCIENCE BUILDING 
MANHATTAN COLLEGE 

NEW YORK FOUNDLING HOSPITAL 

LOYOLA HALL ADDITION 
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY 



387 



Compliments of 



STUDENT FACULTY ORGANIZATION 



of the 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Congratulations to the Class of 1960 



THE ROD AND GUN CLUB 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

DEDICATED TO GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP AND 
WILDLIFE CONSERVATION 



Congratulations and Best Wishes for a Successful Future 
to the 

CLASS OF 1960 

from the 

ECONOMICS ACADEMY 



388 




Yearbook Is In Distinguished Company 




Some of the Fine College and High School Year 
books Produced by Baker, Jones, Hausauer, Inc 




Its always wise to "look" at the company they keep when 
selecting a yearbook publisher. That's one of the reasons your staff 
selected Baker, Jones, Hausauer to produce your yearbook. 
BJH is nationally recognized as an outstanding producer of 
yearbooks. We have earned this reputation in the development of 
a unique "package" program that puts all responsibility for art, 
engraving, printing, (by letterpress or offset) and binding in one 
place — this means your staff is freed from production details 
and so can spend more time on editorial creation. The fine 
yearbook in your hands shows how the "package plan" works 
to everyone's advantage. 



BAKER, JONES, HAUSAUER, INC. 



Producers of Fine Yearbooks and Advertising Printing 
BUFFALO, NEW YORK 



Patrons 



Richard Cardinal Cushing 
Most Rev. Eric F. MacKenzie, D.D. 
Most Rev. Jeremiah F. Minihan, D.D. 
Very Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 
Rev. William V. E. Casey, S.J. 
Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J. 
Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 
Rev. Charles B. Toomey, S.J. 
Rita P. Kelleher 



Dr. & Mrs. John M. Amore 

Mr. & Mrs. Attelio Astolfi 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Paul Aubuchon 

Mr. Thomas L. Aylward 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Baczek 

Dr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Bailey 

Mr. & Mrs. Harrison Ball, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Horace E. Barker 

Mr. & Mrs. James N. Barrett 

Mrs. Frank W. Barry 

Mr. & Mrs. Julio T. Beauchamp 

Mrs. Julia Beauchesne 

Mr. & Mrs. Urban J. Belval 

Mrs. Peter J. Bernard 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert P. Bernazani 

Mr. Thomas P. Berry 

Mrs. Henry C. Bertram 

Prof. & Mrs. Paul A. Boulanger 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest F. Bourque 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Henry Bourque 

Mr. Francis I. Bowen 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Boyle 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Brennan 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Brophy 

Mr. Robert E. Brosnahan 

Mrs. Lillian Brown 

Mr. Michael Brown 

Mr. & Mrs. Elmer E. Butterworth 

Mrs. Charles J. Burke 

William J. Burke 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Burns 

Arthur A. Byron 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Cadigan 

Mrs. Concetta M. Calabro 

Dr. Harold F. Cail 

Mrs. Harold F. Cail 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Campanella 

Dr. & Mrs. Earle F. Campbell 

Mrs. Fred L. Campbell 

Mr. & Mrs. John Cannalonga 

Mr. James R. Carrabir 



Mr. Patrick L. Carr 

Mrs. Irene A. Carroll 

Charles E. Carton, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Carty 

Mr. Joseph A. Carty & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony R. Caruso 

Mr. Andrew J. Casey 

Mr. Anthony B. Cashman 

Mrs. Sabina P. Cashman 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Cass, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony L. Celata 

Mr. Harold Chen 

Mr. Harold E. Clarke 

Mr. David B. Clooney 

Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Colantuono 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Colella 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry T. Colligan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Collins 

Mr. Maurice Collins 

Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas W. Colomey 

Mr. Joseph M. Connolly 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Connelly 

Matthew T. Connolly 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Conroy 

Mr. Everett J. Conway 

Mr. John J. Corcoran 

Mrs. Wm. Cotter 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Counihan 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Croatti 

Mrs. Timothy H. Cronin 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Crowley 

Mr. Thomas P. Cunnally 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph S. Curcio 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald J. Cusack 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Sheldon Daly 

Mrs. George A. Daley, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Everett J. Davis 

Mrs. Winola H. Davis 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Dailey 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick A. Deady 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen O. Dean 

Mr. & Mrs. Rocco De Angelo 

Mr. & Mrs. Amato De Napoli 

Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius Dennehy 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilfred T. Dery 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Desneu 

Mr. & Mrs. Roderick Desaulniers 

Mr. Joseph A. Desrosiers 

Mrs. Edward L. Donovan 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick J. Donovan 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Donovan 

Mr. Francis X. Donnelly 



390 



Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. Martin P. Dockery 

Mr. Thomas H. Dolan 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Dooley 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen V. Dooling 

Mr. & Mrs. M. J. Dorney 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Driscoll 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Drummey 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Duane 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Duffy 

Dr. & Mrs. Christopher J. Duncan 

Mr. & Mrs. George V. Dunne 

Dr. & Mrs. Frank Durant 

Mr. Albert B. Ebner 

Mr. William A. Edmonds 

Mr. "Walter J. Edyvean, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Enright 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Erwin 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick W. Esterhill 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Everett 

Mr. Thomas E. Fagan 

Mrs. Thomas E. Fagan 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Failla 

Mr. John J. Farmer 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Federer 

Canice J. Fennelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Fernandes 

Mr. & Mrs. James S. Fightlin 

Edward & Helen Finnegan 

Mr. & Mrs. Terrence F. Finneran 

J. H. Fisk Co. — Tires 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Fitzgerald 

Mary C. Fitzgerald 

Mr. John J. Flaherty 

Mrs. John Molloy Flynn 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick F. Flynn 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Folan 

Mr. Coleman J. Foley 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald S. Foley 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Harold Friary 

Mr. Thomas J. Gallagher, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Gannon, Sr. 

Mr. Albert L. Gendron 

Mr. Bernard W. Gleason, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. George A. Goodhue 

Mr. & Mrs. John T. Gorman 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Greco 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Francis Greene 

Mrs. Ralph W. Gridley 

Mr. Joseph Giuliano 

Mrs. Mary B. Haley 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph H. Hammond 

Frank J. Hand, M.D. 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Hannan 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur J. Hanson 

Mr. John J. Harney, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis M. Harrington 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Harrington 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Hart 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis J. Hayes 

Mr. Daniel J. Heafey, Sr. 

Mr. Daniel A. Healy, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence E. Heath 

Mr. & Mrs. Leslie J. Herzog 

Ann Hession 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward V. Hickey 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Hickey 

Mr. James L. Higgins 

Mr. Edward T. Hilferty 

Colonel & Mrs. John P. Hoar, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis E. Hopper 

Mr. & Mrs. Oscar J. Home 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman V. Huff 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward R. Hughes 

Mr. & Mrs. T. Robert Hurley 

Mr. Thomas M. Hurley 

Mr. Albert L. Hyland 

Mr. William V. Hyland 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund J. Johnson 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Joseph Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur F. Joy 

Mary A. Judge 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Keaney 

Mr. & Mrs. Benedict Keating 

John J. Keaveney 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Keegan 

Mrs. Brendan A. Kelly 

Doctor & Mrs. Francis A. Keleher 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Keleher 

Mr. & Mrs. E. P. Kelleher 

Mr. & Mrs. James Kelleher 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Kelly 

Bernard S. Kernsey 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Keohane 

Mr. & Mrs. James F. Kepple 

Mr. & Mrs. William M. Keresey 

Mr. Victor A. Khoury 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Koenig 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick L. Kuhn 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee E. Lambert 

Mrs. Laurence J. Lane 

Christine G. Langan 

Mr. & Mrs. William C. Langzettel 

Mrs. Edward G. Lawrie 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry M. Leen 



39] 



Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. John F. Lennon 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis T. Leonard, Sr. 

Mr. Albert Levitt 

Mr. Samuel Litman 

Lee Loumos Radio-TV 

Mrs. Francis E. Lynch 

Mr. Thomas F. Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald T. MacDonald 

Mr. & Mrs. George F. Maher 

Mrs. Margaret B. Mahoney 

Mr. & Mrs. James S. Malger 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Manning 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Marcaccio 

Mr. Pierre A. Marceau 

Dr. & Mrs. Bernard Marcotullio 

Mr. Gene A. Mariano 

Mr. A. Leonard Marma 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Marshall 

Mr. & Mrs. James Martin 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Mastronardi 

Mr. & Mrs. S. W. Mazva 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry L. McAuliffe 

John T. McAuliffe 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick J. McAuliffe 

Mr. & Mrs. James P. McCabe 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. McCarthy 

Mr. Timothy J. McCarthy 

Mr. Michael J. McCauley 

Mrs. Loretta E. McDonough 

Mr. Frederick W. McGarrah 

Dr. Laurence W. McGrath 

Mr. John J. McLaughlin, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Allan S. McLean 

Hon. Frederick V. McMenimen 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard S. McNamara 

Mr. James J. McTeague 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry L. McQueeney 

Mr. & Mrs. John B. Melia 

Mr. & Mrs. Manuel Mello 

Mr. & Mrs. William Michaud 

Mrs. Anthony D. Milano 

Mr. & Mrs. James T. Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Miller, Sr. 

Mrs. Helen Milton 

Mr. Anthony Minichiello 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip J. Molloy 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Monahan 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Moran 

Mr. Frank Morelli 

Mr. & Mrs. Clovis E. Morin 

Oliva J. Morneau 

Mrs. Louise Mororen 



Mr. & Mrs. F. B. Morrison 

Mr. Fred B. Morrison 

Mrs. Francis T. Morrissey 

Mr. Thomas J. Muckian 

Dr. & Mrs. Philip E. Mullane 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Mullen, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. B. Munsey 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Murphy 

Mr. Daniel I. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Murray 

Mr. Joseph F. Neal 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Nichols 

Mr. & Mrs. Victor Z. Nickrosz 

Mrs. Martin Norton 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. O'Brien 

Mr. Norton C O'Brien, Sr. 

Mr. Bert Ogden 

Mr. Francis A. OLeary 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry C. O'Neil 

Mr. & Mrs. James O'Neill 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter M. O'Neill 

Mr. Michael P. OSullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. O'Toole 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Palmer 

Mr. John F. Parsons 

Mr. Allston C. Patterson 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Pell 

Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Pelletier 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Perachi 

Mr. & Mrs. Felix Perriello 

Mr. William Perron, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Perry 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip E. Peters 

Mr. William L. Petkewich 

Mr. & Mrs. Patsy Petrosino 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Plansky 

Mr. & Mrs. F. R. Plummer 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Pierce 

Mr. & Mrs. Edmund Pultinas 

Mrs. Louise Puopolo 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Quinn 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Rabbitt 

Mr. Max Randall 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick C. Rattigan, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilfred W. Raymond, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Reagan 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Reilly 

Mr. Joseph N. Resha 

Mr. & Mrs. Alexander F. Reynolds 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Riddell 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Rigazio 

Mr. J. F. Rinehart 



392 



Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Rizzo 

Mr. H. E. Roberts 

Mr. Joseph Z. Robillard 

Mr. Harry Robinson 

Mr. Wilfred D. Rochon 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Rogers 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Romero 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Roughan 

Mr. Joseph R. Rousseau 

Mrs. Laura B. Roy 

Mr. & Mrs. Irving Rudman 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry G. Russell 

Mr. James W. Savage, Jr. 

Mrs. Josephine F. Scabia 

Mr. John Schoppmeyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Sexton 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Seymour 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Shaughnessy 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis T. Shaw 

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Shea 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald F. Shea 

Mrs. Marguerite F. Shea 

Mrs. Max Stanga 

Mr. & Mrs. Alexander Stankunas 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Stanton 

Mr. & Mrs. Royce C. Stearns 

Mrs. Philip Suarez 

Mrs. Daniel Sughrue 

Dr. Cornelius F. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Sullivan 

Stephen P. Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. William P. Sullivan 

Joseph F. Sweeney 



William M. Sweeney 

Paula Frances Sweet 

Mrs. Frank Testa 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Timoney 

Mr. Patrick H. Tonra 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Topor 

Mr. & Mrs. Nestor Toran 

Mr. Bruno J. Tosi 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward W. Tracy 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Tretter 

Mr. Joseph L. Tribble 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Tweedie 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Vannie 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis S. Verde 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory P. Voci 

Dr. M. F. Vidoli 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Walker 

Mrs. J. Allen Wallace 

Mr. James P. Walsh, Sr. 

Mrs. Ruth Ward 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. Watt 

Mr. & Mrs. Augustus A. Welling 

Dr. Walter A. Whalen 

Mr. & Mrs. George White 

Mr. Lawrence J. Winston 

Mr. Alexander V. Wisneski 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Witkun 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Wlodarczyk 

Mr. & Mrs. John L. Woods 

Mr. Taft G. Zeadey 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Zilinski 

Andrew E. Zilonis 



393 



EPILOGUE 




(The following is an address by William Cardinal O'Connell to the graduates of Boston College, class of 18 
No more eloquent and thought-provoking epilogue could be written for the Sub Turn and Class of 1960.) 



My Dear Young Friends : 

Only a few days now stand between you and the happy consummation 
of years and hopes, labor and preparation. Thrice more the sun will rise 
and set, and then He will come again and will look down from His glorious 
throne of light upon your day. A day to be remembered by you as long as 
you live. A day when, in your complete absorption in the knowledge of 
what it is to you, you will forget for the time what else is happening 
through all the world. Matters of greatest moment cease to interest you in 
the centering utterly of all your interests upon one joyous reality — today 
I am to be graduated. Today Alma Mater empowered by the State confers 
upon me the title of truest nobility — knowledge. Only a few days more 
and your triumph comes. Upon your brows this school of learning will 
place the crown of honor, and the good and true men who have watched 
over your years of probation will cry out at last, "nunc plaudite." And 
singularly cold and indifferent would be the youth, who on that occasion 
did not feel as he steps out upon the threshold of his Alma Mater, as he 
says adieu to classroom and study hall, a tingle of delight, a thrill of 
victory, now that the crown is secure. 

What though ties be severed, dear friends be separated from the union, 
the intimacy so close, so holy. That must be. There must ever be a twinge 
of sorrow or regret in every deepest joy. So we may not stop for that only 
to give a quick, firm clasp of the hand, and a strong deep look into the 
eyes, and you pass in a moment from the school to the world. In a few 
days all this shall happen to you. 

Commencement Day means this to every one of you. But ere the joy of 
that day comes, banishing for the time every other emotion, there is need 
of reflection upon the full significance of the ceremony called graduation. 
Upon that occasion our beloved Alma Mater sends forth to a larger, freer 
life, another band of children. To her the occasion is not all joy. She 
has witnessed these scenes so often that her gladness is tempered by 
experience. She smiles, indeed with approbation of the past as she lays 
the crown upon your forehead, but can you not read in her eyes the look 



of caution for the future? Can you not scan upon her face the expression 
of responsibility? As she looses the bond that bound you lovingly to her 
side, and imprinted upon your brow the holy kiss, she says farewell, 
think you not that in her heart there is a sob unheard, for the uncertainty 
of what the future may bring to each of you? Think you not that deep 
below the joy of her countenance there is always that solicitude of a 
mother for her child that none but mothers can ever understand? Ah yes, 
young friends, she feels deeply the fact that in large measure of whatever 
the future brings to you, must in a degree be said of her also. Your work 
in life must be in a measure considered her work, and her reputation and 
fair name, and her fame among men she knows full well must be what 
each of her children makes it. Your success will be her glory; your failure 
will be her shame. 

If in after life a child of hers climbs rung by rung the ladder that 
mounts to fame he carries with him even to the top his college diploma. 
"That man is a Boston College man," the world says. And should one upon 
whom she has conferred her title of nobility lag lazily along the road 
of life, or forgetting his rightful place and dignity slip down the highway, 
and fall below the level, then he drags his diploma in the dust with him, 
and men whisper sneeringly, "That is a Boston College man." It is useless 
to cry out injustice. It must be ever so. A mother's reputation must be 
inseparably connected with that of her child. 

Share in Common Prestige 

And not only Alma Mater, but her alumni share this solicitude. We 
too must be partakers in no small degree of whatever glory or shame 
comes to each individual fellow alumnus. We are inevitably affected by 
the reputation of men of the same college. Emerson says every community 
lives upon the credit of its members. The fact that in a certain city lives 
the inventor of the telephone reflects a certain lustre upon evety one 
of its citizens. Do we not know that the humblest inhabitant of Stratford- 
on-Avon has a sure prestige to his name? Why do men boast of graduation 



394 



from certain schools of learning if not on account of the great men they 
have turned out? The character therefore of each graduate of Boston 
College must be a source of solicitude to every one who owes his degree 
to her. If you are her sons, you are our brothers. In each case, the honor 
of our family is at stake. 

I come before you, therefore, tonight, in the name of Boston College, 
her president and her faculty: I come before you in the capacity of a repre- 
sentative of her alumni, to speak to you a brief word of what your life in 
the future must be, what you must make it be, that we all, mother and 
children alike, may be not the losers but the gainers by your relationship 
with her and with us; to wish you Godspeed on the great road of life 
which soon opens broad and wide before you; to offer you our hand and 
pledge our help to each of you in fellowship of alumni; to say to you as 
you pass from these sacred precincts that word which sums up all best 
wishes, all happiest auguries, all cheeriest prospects — Success. Success 
attend you! Success follow you! Yes, my dear young friends, in the lexicon 
of youth there must indeed be no such word as failure. By every tie that 
binds you to Alma Mater, by every law that exacts your allegiance to the 
State, by every hope that binds you to Heaven and God, you are bound to 
succeed, you must win success. And as I offer you the wish from my heart, 
I see your eyes upturned to me, and in them I read the query, how? In 
the earnestness of your faces, I can see the determination to succeed. The 
will is there, but you ask the secret of this coveted boon. 

I must try to answer you, though my words be weak and my language 
inadequate. I myself am incapable of giving you response; but from the 
lips of older and greater men I bring you the lesson I today teach you; 
men whose lives have illustrated the words they spoke; they, not I, shall 
speak to you tonight. It is because others have shaped their lives upon 
these principles that I venture to enumerate them to you, that moulding 
your character upon these lines the same happy results may follow to 
you as they have achieved. I am conscious of the fact that among your 
number there are some who will choose as their life the ecclesiastical 
state. To such my address is only meant to apply in general terms. In 
due time and proper place, they will learn from wiser and better men 
than I, the lesson he must learn who takes as his lot and the portion of 
his inheritance, God Himself. And yet the principles to be followed, the 
qualities of mind and heart to be cultivated to ensure good service in 
the Lord's fields differ not in kind, but rather in degree from those which 
make great men in the world. 

Must Make Strenuous Effort 

My words tonight are especially addressed to those of you who intend 
to work in the world, in the professions or in business life. Those who 
have heard in their souls the Voice of God calling them, as did Aaron of 
old, will still have years of special training, during which day after day 
they will hearken to the Voice and imbibe the spirit of their sacred 
calling. But for the others there will be fewer and rarer opportunities 
of sacred counsel, and so it is fitting that you take with you as you depart 
provisions for your journey. And so I pray God that the thought sug- 
gested to you may sink deeply into your soul, and taking root there will 
bring forth fruit — that, during your hours of labor and heart weariness, 
they may be to you strength and comfort and encouragement. 

I say to you therefore, you must succeed. Your life must be a success. 
As I speak to philosophers, I must show the reason of things. I must 
prove my proposition or my discourse will have little weight. What then 
is success, and are we bound to attain it? By success is meant a prosperous 
issue: the accomplishment of an intended result: the attainment of an 
end in view. As Christians therefore, I ask you is it a simple matter of 
choice whether taking this life as a whole you succeed or not? Is not the 
whole duty of every mortal hour the strenuous, continued and all im- 
portant work to see, that when at last we lay down our task forever, we 
receive the commendation of our Eternal Master and hear from His 
Lips, "Euge, Euge"? 

God, Final End of Life 

What is the final end of life? Recall one of the first propositions of 
your natural theology. What, but God Himself? And therefore in this 
we must succeed. That end reached, that purpose achieved, all is well. 
That aim unreached, that result unaccomplished, all is failure. Unless 
God be the real goal of our destinies, unless ultimately all interest 
centers in Him, unless we finally arrive at the possession of the Infinite, 
for all eternity, we shall have failed indeed utterly, irretrievably, miserably. 



In vain all our days and nights of toil. In vain the wisdom of books. In 
vain the brilliant intellect, in vain the fertile brain, in vain everything, 
God lost, all is lost. The great success is the final success, and the great 
failure is the final failure. Both signify the attainment or the unattain- 
ment of our final purpose, our ultimate end, God. As Christians you 
believe this, as students you are going into a world where most men 
have lost sight of this sublime fact. Because by contact with the 
materialism of the day your spiritual sense may be dulled. Because your 
every occupation, your every association, your every pleasure, still tend 
to weaken your convictions, or at least distract you from the considera- 
tion of them. Your faith alone must keep that clear. Above all the din 
of work, amid all the worry of affairs, even through the hours of your 
enjoyment, and most of all in the hour of your triumphs, let one word 
be ever audible to the ear of your soul, one syllable be ever present to 
the eye of your mind — God. For you surely it would be doubly culpable 
to forget this; you, who every day of your college life have read the 
motto: "Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam"; read it in the inscription upon your 
college walls, read it in the books you have studied, but read it most of 
all and clear of all in the daily lives of your professors. No, no, whatever 
the future brings, it cannot surely bring to any of you the obliteration 
of that truth. Be true to your faith, be true to your training, and your 
spiritual success must be secure. In other things prosperity may not 
always depend upon us. After all our greatest effort fortune may not 
always smile. But this is our glory and our pride, that he who wills may 
attain God. This you must look to; this you must make sure, that you 
stand upon the shores of eternity, when the great Commencement Day 
arrives, the premium vitae aeternae be awarded you by the great Master, 
Christ. In this I say to you, success attend you. May your life be crowned 
with eternal success. 

This principle established, this all-pervading truth well fixed in our 
minds, so fixed that come what else may, that is ever firm and steadfast, 
turn your thoughts now to success from the standpoint of the world. Are 
you free to succeed or fail insofar as it depends upon each of you? Are 
you not in duty bound to seek all that is best in human life? Christ said: 
"Seek ye first the Kingdom of God, and all these things will be added unto 
you." The bliss of eternity must hold pre-eminence in all our aims. It must 
be first in our intentions. But St. Thomas says "Quod primum est in 
intentione ultimum est in assecutione." Hence the distinction of end and 
means. Between us and Heaven is mortal life, and life is made up of a 
succession of acts. And we know that for each single act we shall be held 
responsible. Faith without good works is dead, and we know by good 
works are meant not only the acts called properly religious, but whatever 
we do that is good. Practical Christianity sanctifies and vitalizes the whole 
life, as well when we are about our secular duties, as when before the 
sanctuary. Is it not Thomas a Kempis who says we must work as though 
we were to live here on earth a thousand years, and yet remember always 
that we may die tonight? Prudent faith teaches us that he who kneels in 
prayer, while duty bids him work, is culpable, not laudable. It follows then, 
that you must not only seek spiritual success, but, as far as in you lies, 
temporal success, as a means always to the great end. You surely must 
remember that meditation in the spiritual exercises of St. Ignatius, in 
which he so admirably teaches that every thing good in itself may be 
sought, provided only it be used for God. In that light, not only poverty, 
but riches are holy. Not only humiliation, but fame is desirable. Not only 
lowliness of station, but the highest posts of honor, may be coveted. 
Indeed there may be circumstances when it is by success, and by material 
temporal success alone, that heaven may be reached. To you, therefore, 
who will soon be numbered upon the lists of members of the legal and 
medical professions, or who will follow a business life in any position, 
we say again, mount to the top, aspire to the heights, be each of you in 
your own vocation a success. 

Qualifications for Success 

We have spoken of the way to achieve spiritual success. What, now, 
is the road to temporal success? You, my dear young men, have three 
things in your possession that are immensely in your favor. Sufficient 
ability — your diploma is guarantee of that — youth and limited financial 
means. God only knows how many great men have been lost to the world 
on account of affluence in youth, which too often instead of paving the 
way to sure distinction, robs life of a stimulus to action, and by luxury 
weakens the capability and the desire to labor, the only royal road to real 
achievement. 



395 



In the possession of these three gifts, therefore, with which you start 
in life, one may almost say, what is impossible? Ability, youth and work. 
Ability, the stone, beautiful and white, that lies ready at hand in the 
quarry of the mind; work, that hews it from its native bed, and chisels it 
into the just proportions of a beautiful statue, and youth, that diffusing 
this moulded form with the glow of ardor and enthusiasm, breathes, as it 
were, into it the breath of life, and behold the dead stone moves — moves 
with power, and grace, and beauty, and all who behold the wonder 
applaud, and success is won. Let us look for a moment at each of these 
three sisters, these three graces of nature, and see the conditions of each, 
and the best methods of most effectually combining them. 

Chemistry has taught you that simple elements isolated may remain 
inert forever. It is in their union as a compound that force lies to produce 
a substance utterly different and generally superior in utility to any single 
one of its components. In practical operation, however, it is of essential 
importance to know not only the value of each element, but the laws of 
proportion by which combinations are governed. He who is not familiar 
with both these principles runs the risk of his life every time he enters 
his laboratory. Many an alchemist of old, searching for the elixir vitae, 
paid the penalty of such ignorance. And though by the superstition of the 
unlearned, he was believed to have been carried off by the evil one, in 
all probability, it was in many cases a simple matter of applying a spark 
to a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, or some similar blunder in the law 
of combinations. The laws of combination in human life are as cognoscible 
as those of chemical compounds. Genius is the only simple element that 
dares evade all law, and that is so rare that it does not affect the general 
proposition. 

Ability, Enthusiasm and Work 

Ability, enthusiasm, work; behold the elements. Respect the laws of 
their proportions, and from the mortar where they are mingled will surely 
issue, bright and pure, the golden nugget of success. Ignore them and 
either you will find as a result only the dark dregs of disappointment, or 
else a sudden brilliant explosion, which passes in a moment and leaves 
behind only a puff of black vapor and a foul odor to tell the tale of 
rashness. Learn them and the laws laid down by those versed in the 
science of life; and knowing them, obey. 

Ability means power to achieve. We are not gods, but men. Our ability 
is therefore, finite not infinite. We can do something, not all things. We 
are circumscribed in power, as we are in being. We have doubtless learned 
by experience, that we can perform certain acts with greater ease and 
more pleasure than others. We must also be conscious that though we 
are not proficient in every field there is one in which we excel our 
neighbor. We recognize his superiority in one branch of knowledge or 
industry, and we are equally certain of our own in another. No man is 
omniscient. In nature, as in grace, there is a division of gifts. Here then 
is the first law staring us in the face. We are specialists by nature. God 
has given to each his particular work; and nature, God's handmaid, has 
built us accordingly. Here is a principle at once humiliating and elevating. 
We can not only do our own work well, but we can do our own work 
better than anyone else in the world. The first application, therefore, of 
our law must be the endeavor to find our proper field, and to concentrate 
our energies upon that. How many men have been utter and complete 
failures, because they were prodigal of their own ability; wasting it over a 
thousand fields which in the end yielded nothing; instead of husbanding it, 
guarding it with care and using it in the lines which responded fruitfully 
to cultivation. Be conscientious in the choice of your profession; a mistake 
in this means almost certain failure. Never enter any vocation from any 
motive but this — that you truly and sincerely believe that there is your 
place. You can never hope to be happy anywhere else. Your choice made, 
your duty there is plain. The power, the knowledge within you must grow 
and increase; it must stretch itself out to the very limits of its own sphere. 
It must develop surely, if slowly, until in that particular branch of human 
activity you feel entirely at home, among your own as it were, familiar 
and akin to all around you. Thus your ability, your power of achievement, 
now in its native element, will broaden and deepen, as the river naturally 
widens toward the sea. You must not judge your talents too closely by the 
standards of success you have met in academic studies; for while by 
discipline of the mind they prepare and sharpen the intellect for particular 
study, they are, as a rule, no just criterion of particular and individual 
ability. The youth with an aptitude for legal study may become a judge, 
though he wrestled often in vain with his Tacitus. And we are surprised 
to see a classmate who could never apply a rule of logic, or remember a 



proof in metaphysics, gaining fame and fortune by his skill in applying 
the lance or prescribing wonderful remedies. First, then, I would say to 
you, search yourself well, and find in just what your ability involves 
responsibility. Power to its last particle, is duty. Remember the words of 
Doctor Johnson: "No man is without some quality, by the due application 
of which he might deserve well of the world. And whoever he be that has 
but little power should be in haste to do that little, lest he be confounded 
with him who can do nothing." The servant condemned in the Gospel 
was rebuked not because he had lost or wasted what was given him, but 
because he did not use the two talents to produce more. In a marching 
army, he who stands still will soon be in the rear; too late for the trophies 
of victory. Ability, like an unused sword, rusts, and when the crisis of 
battle comes is utterly useless. This, therefore, is the first law to be 
observed; whatever ability has been given you, great or small, properly 
directed, constantly improved, must be efficient in the work in which you 
have prudently chosen to exercise it. 

The Great Power of Youth 

Now for a word about the second of your possessions — youth. What 
the Spring is to the year, youth is to human life. Sing as you may of the 
other seasons, the springtime is the time of freshness, beauty and joy; all 
nature teems with exuberance of life, and at the sight of it mankind feels 
the newness of hope rekindled. 

Quickly it comes, quickly it departs. But in its very brevity is its power 
of accomplishment. The fever of life runs high, and things at other times 
seemingly impossible are done with a bound. It is so with youth. Its very 
inexperience is the strongest impulse to endeavor. In the Fall, men sit by 
the hearth and say: "Ah, the sky looked so fair in May, the dews so gentle 
and the sun so gracious. But they are false. The rains have swept the fields, 
and the grass is withered. At the last the crops are not what we reckoned, 
and winter is here. Put in another log; it is cold already." But youth 
knows only the Spring; Fall and Winter will come soon enough. Each 
season has its lesson, and the lesson of Spring is hope. There are those 
who think young age a crime, as there are those who consider old age a 
misfortune. It seems to me God knows best; that the fullness of life is in 
both; in the enthusiasm of early years and the prudent wisdom of later life. 

Were all the world young, there would be superfluity of action and 
lack of counsel. If all the world were old, it would be a tedious existence, 
where everybody knew what to do without the power to do it. Nature is 
never wrong. The Fall is the complement of the Spring, and a ripe, old 
age is the sequence of a well-spent youth. Camden says: "Young men 
think old men to be fools, and old men know young men to be so." Both 
are wrong. Each is necessary to each, and if the young are bound to revere 
the old, the old are bound to respect the young. If action without counsel 
is fire, counsel without action is ashes. Mutual regard must follow mutual 
service. Suffice it to you now that you are young, and remember that the 
duty of youth is action. Do not be disheartened by a mistake now and 
then. Mistakes must be made since we are human, and if you hesitate to 
act from fear of mistake, awaiting the time when you will be surely right, 
you will make the greatest of all mistakes, for that time will never come. 
Human wisdom consists in never failing in the same thing twice. The 
danger of enthusiasm lies not in its quantity, so much as in its direction. 
Take counsel with those older than you; men whose wisdom and experi- 
ence have given them the divine right to judge others. Learn from them 
what your courage ought to be in every important action. Be not too sure 
of your own opinions. There is much wisdom, as well as wit, in the 
saying of our own Dr. Holmes: "Everything is twice as large in a three 
year old's three foot scale as in a thirty year old's six foot scale." What 
seems to you of transcendent importance, because it impresses your fresh 
young heart deeply, may be exceedingly unimportant in reality. But when 
you have learned by due consideration and reflection, as well as from the 
advice of worthy men of counsel and prudence, that your duty lies in a 
certain line, that your work is in a certain sphere, then put into it all the 
fervor, all the enthusiasm, all the fire of your youth; remember what is 
worth doing, is worth doing well. Never rest until the goal is won. Lift 
high the sail of courage, and God will surely send you the favoring gale 
that will blow your craft, guided by wise advice, into the sure haven of 
success. It may be that, too much canvas to the wind, your little boat may 
sometimes tip, even to the water's edge. What if, now and then, you catch 
a wave, and you feel the dash of the spray in your face and over your 
body. Never mind, it is only water, and if only it be clean, it will soon 
dry, and serve only to refresh you and give you new impetus to progress. 
There is sure to be opposition enough. The man who has no critics has 



396 



no inferiors. Be sure that so long as you are willing to remain with the 
mass, they will be willing to say nothing. It is when you determine to 
rise that you feel their clutch at your coat tails. As, therefore, you must be 
proof against mere flattery, so must you not sink under undeserved 
reproof, whether it take the form of ridicule or sneering. Do not believe 
every one who says you are a genius, and do not give credence to every one 
who says you are fool. The truth that you must feel is that you are neither. 
Keep your spirit humble, but humility does not mean that you must 
consider yourself worthless. What but holy enthusiasm filled the soul of 
the great Apostle of the Gentiles when he cried out: "I can do all things 
in Him who strengthened me." Think you that he was indifferent as to 
whether his speech before the great men at the Acropolis was a success? 
No, you may be certain that on that occasion his soul was filled with all 
the enthusiasm it could hold; enthusiasm such as every other man must 
feel who has embarked on a high purpose which has God for its end. 

Keep Your Ardor Fresh 

Apathy in youth is a positive vice. You may possess much ability; you 
may have superior intelligence and extraordinary gifts, but until these 
endowments are vitalized by the breath of ambition, ardor and enthusiasm; 
until you are inspired to effort by the desire to do something worthy of 
you, and to take your proper place among men, you will be only the 
stagnant pool where torpid things live, and where the only sign of life 
is the croaking of frogs, instead of the flowing river that turns the mill 
and hears along its banks the hum of happy voices as they toil at the wheel. 
Keep your ardor fresh. Renew often your youthful aspirations. They will 
sweeten your life, and give zest to your endeavors. Taste makes food 
palatable. Enthusiasm lightens labor and makes it pleasant. Life is at times 
difficult enough. Without the ardor of a purpose, the elevating power of 
ambition, the high proper enthusiasm, the strongest will sink by the 
wayside, heart weary and faint. This, then, be your second principle to 
guide you to a prosperous life. Enkindle in the ability you possess the holy 
fire of youthful zeal, transforming the latent power within you into 
activity and usefulness. And you will ever find that the purest fountain 
whence you may draw the most lasting encouragement, the most elevating 
and substantial hope, is God and religion. Hold up before your aim 
whatever is good in life, reputation, prosperity, wealth, honor, social 
position. But behind them all, and above them all, aim at eternity. The 
rest may prove but castles in the air, beautiful but evanescent but eternity 
is a mansion which can never fall. 

And now we come to consider what all men agree to be the most 
important and the most necessary element in the combinations that go 
to make up the surest and most lasting kind of success. I mean work. 
Without persistent, conscientious, persevering work, you can never hope 
to achieve anything of substantial and permanent work. You may possess 
ability of a high degree; you may have achieved a reputation for proficiency 
in study; you may have even led the ranks, and taken first place in your 
class, but if satisfied with that you now rest on your oars, expecting the 
prestige thus gained to waft you lazily into distinction in life, you will 
fail, signally, inevitably fail. Just at this period of your life you are apt to 
value even beyond their worth the prizes which are only meant to stimulate 
to further effort. In the great world which now you are to enter, those 
things are rated at a truer value; and though you have earned your honors 
well in this field, remember you are now promoted to another class, and to 
gain the prize there you must prove your right to it by new titles. Have 
you not known men to fail in philosophy who have taken the medal in 
poetry? You will also learn, if you do not know alteady, that the men who 
get highest honors in philosophy do not always lead in the class of life. If, 
therefore, you have won distinction in college, you must not rest there. 
Rather must you of all the rest see to it that by the position you win 
hereafter among men, you vindicate the honors Alma Mater confers upon 
you; and that can be done only by work. You may have a facility to 
achieve, which flatters you into the deception that for you labor is 
unnecessary. You will soon learn that with most people facility is fatal. 
Things accomplished with a little labor are generally of little worth. Read 
the list of names of those against whom the world has marked genius. You 
will find that they have won title only by earnest, untiring labor. Indeed, 
someone has said that genius is only a greater capacity for work. If you 
want knowledge you must labor as surely as if you want food; you must 
not be an idler. God gives food to every bird that lives, but He does not 
throw it into the nest; He provides it in nature, teaches where to find it, 
and then leaves to industry the rest. And the flight to where the berry 
grows brings strength, and growth, and aptitude to enjoy it when found. 



Is it not a sacred law of nature that every pleasure, every honor, every 
prize has its price, labor, work, effort. And does she not bless him doubly 
who accepts this law. She gives him what he seeks, and in some way 
makes him the better in himself for striving for it. 

Progress Comes With Work 

Look at those countries where nature does most, where man, like a 
spoiled child needs least to work for life's sustenance; and then look 
again at the country where men must make amends for nature's lack by 
toil; where is life richest? Where is man strongest physically and mentally? 
Where has science progressed the most? Where has humanity reached 
highest in the scale of development? Where, but in those countries where 
men work for what is best for human nature. Alas, too often they have lost 
sight of God in their search for knowledge, wealth, and power; but there 
was the fault of man. The law of nature still remained true, that by work 
comes progress, development and supremacy. Civilization is the product of 
work; and in just the proportion that men refuse to labor and sink into 
idleness do they lose the pleasure and grace of refined life, and degenerate 
into barbarism. The truth, therefore, which must sink deepest into your 
souls tonight is this: The surest lever to success is work. You must realize 
most thoroughly that you cannot dream yourself into greatness and 
superiority; you must hammer and forge yourself into it. If you have been 
hitherto indolent, here is a new opportunity to begin. If you have been 
industrious until now, increase rather than slacken the pace you have 
taken. Commencement Day marks a crisis in your life: "Let the dead bury 
the dead." On that day a new life opens to you; on that day a new 
page is offered to you. What will you write upon it? Shall it be 
indolence or industry? That depends upon you, and your whole life 
depends upon that. Life is very short, and yet our good name, our 
reputation now and with posterity, our eternity itself, is just what 
our life shall make it. Here are your elements of success; ability, 
enthusiasm, work. To be mingled in this proposition; as much ability as 
God has given you, as much enthusiasm well directed as your nature 
yields, and the importance of the end aimed at requires, and finally, to 
complete the combination, as much continuous labor as you can bring, 
allowance made for proper and refreshing recreation of mind and body; 
and surer than any law of chemistry, the result must be success. Not always 
in the sense of fame, publicity, or glory. These are but the shadows of 
substantial worth. But the success which means duty done, a real end 
accomplished, a real aim attained — this is the lesson I would bring to 
you tonight; a lesson not from my lips, but left to humanity by the wisest 
and greatest men of history. These are the chief elements that you must 
bring together in happy harmony. 

But there are some others which, though they may be considered 
secondary, are still far from unnecessary and unimportant. I may only hint 
at them, but I cannot pass them unmentioned. Choose your company well; 
mingle with the best minds and souls you can reach. You will learn more 
from cultured and refined men than you will from books. Mental attrition 
is a great educator. The man from whom you can learn nothing wastes 
your time. If you are socially ambitious, remember that the highest society 
is seldom the best. If you are satisfied with the mere veneer of refinement, 
in your associates, you will be obliged to change your friends often, for the 
veneer soon wears off, and the baser substance is then only too evident. 

Do not neglect the proprieties of the social world. Your education may 
give you the entree into all that is best in social life, but without good 
manners you will never get further than the entry. You are free to lead a 
hermit's life if you wish, but if you determine to live among the educated 
and refined, you must conform to the best usages of such people. Say what 
you will, there is generally good philosophy behind etiquette. It is certainly 
meant to be the best safeguard against the contempt born by too much 
familiarity. A Christian will always recognize that good manners are a 
virtue, for they are founded on self-denial and consideration of others. 
Guard your individuality. Be always yourself. Copy whatever you see good 
in others, but do not copy them. Improve your nature as far as you can 
but remain what God made you. How often men imitate the eccentricities 
and mannerisms of the great, and then fancy they are like them. Be 
yourself. Be certain that what you have to do will be best done in your 
own personality. In that line comes another thought. Have your own 
ideas; when those who are older and wiser think different, be deferential, 
but not slavish. God will hold you responsible only for your own 
conclusions. Of course I speak not of matters where we are bound to 
obey, but of mere opinion. That principle must guide you especially in 
political life. In all that you are called upon to do there, be honest, true, 



397 



independent in the best sense of the word. Remember that in your capacity 
of citizen you are in conscience bound to be guided in your political duties 
by the consideration of doing what you honestly think best for the 
Republic. Despise corruption in public life, and think it always a greater 
honor to be a true, brave and virtuous citizen than to occupy meanly the 
highest office in the land. 

The Wisdom of the Ages 

Last of all, but important still, when you have achieved success, cleave 
well to it. How often is the work of years ruined in a day. It is a great 
virtue to be able to stand success. To some it seems far easier to attain 
prosperity than to retain it. When life has progressed, and your labor 
and industry and patience have brought to your feet the bright crown of 
all your temporal hopes, oh! do not make the awful, irreparable mistake 
of casting it with a push into the mire. It has cost such toil, such care, 
such effort to gain it, that you must prize it not only for what it is, but 
for what it represents, the achievements of a life work, a sacred trust 
from God. 

Gentlemen of the class of '94, this is my message to you. If I have 
spoken to you in positive terms, it is because I have implicit faith in those 
who have delivered to me the truths I have uttered, and because the 
principles upon which those words of counsel are founded have been 
accepted by all the world almost .axiomatic. They are not mine, they are 
the property of no man. They depend upon the authority of no individual 
for their force and value. Good wine needs no boast, and what has been 
proven by wide experience in every age will stand without the comment 
of any author, be he old or young. Your duty now lies in this. Treasure 
this wisdom of the ages. Make it yours, to keep, to learn, to follow. 

Keep your faith undimmed, keep your heart clean, aim high, be 
courageous, work faithfully, and you must win in life's battle. Win the 
esteem of honest men. Win the content that follows duty done. Win an 
honorable place in life. Win the praise of Alma Mater. Win the gratitude 
of her Alumni. Win all that is worthy the getting here, and then, the 
smile of God forever. 

May your Commencement Day be to each of you the first in the series 
of happy days that shall end in the bright dawn of heaven. 

William Cardinal O'Connell 
Archbishop of Boston, Massachusetts 
August 30, 1907 — April 22, 1944 



398 













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